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Unread 06-16-2012, 08:26 PM   #1
Timothy_90
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Backpacking food

What do you like to eat in the back country? I've had good experience with the mountain house dehydrated stuff (pretty easy and it tastes pretty good) and we made a few decent things in scouts but I'm looking for some new ideas for a trip I'm taking at the end of the month.

So, what say you?

I've got a stove, a pot and we'll have a campfire we could cook on. If needed I can bring a lightweight skillet but I would love to be able to use a single pot.

And keep in mind, it'll be KY in June, chances of it being hot are high.

I need 2 lunches that can be eaten on the trail, one dinner and a breakfast. This will be a relatively easy and relaxing overnighter with myself and 4 of my friends.

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Unread 06-16-2012, 08:31 PM   #2
Mark-96-XJ
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MRE's they suck but its good food and lots of calories
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Unread 06-16-2012, 10:21 PM   #3
Timothy_90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mark-96-XJ View Post
MRE's they suck but its good food and lots of calories
Eh, not really what I was thinking. I was more looking for recipes for food that tastes good and isn't too terribly difficult to cook in a backcountry environment with no refrigeration, limited weight capacity and somewhat limited cooking utensils.
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Unread 06-17-2012, 12:16 AM   #4
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bring some potatoes, onions, some meat (whatever you like) put it all together and eat it. Bacon is easy to pack and not too heavy. new potatoes work good because they are small. Maybe some mushrooms really any veggies and meat will be ok
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Unread 06-17-2012, 12:48 AM   #5
phitmein
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like you said the lighter stuff like the trail mixes .

Oatmeal for breakfast would work well with safely boiled water .

Light to carry and comes in many different flavors .

I would carry some kind of beef jerky too.

Again very light and good protiens(sp.) .

Potted meat and Saltine crackers ?

A can of tuna fish and the Saltines work well with that too .

Star Kist tuna now sells tuna in a small plastic sealed packet that is just perfect for camping .

Sound like fun and don't forget about rice too .

Have some fun for me too while you are at it .

TIA

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Unread 06-17-2012, 01:04 AM   #6
phitmein
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Damn I left out good old ol' cured country ham .

It needs no special care because it is salt cured .

I like to put it in a pan with water in it and bring it up to a simmer and leave it there for 15 minutes because it takes a lot of the salt taste out of it .

However, I am a very southern born and bred boy and like the salt taste, but then water does tame it down a lot if you don't like it yourself .

Pack it and snack it .
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Unread 06-17-2012, 01:24 AM   #7
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are you required to take your food in bear proof canisters? if so, last time i went we filled up a medium sized canister with top ramen (the ones from the bags). might seem weird but those round canisters dont take square packages very well. we ate that whenever we figured the freeze dried stuff wasn't enough for the day.

also, in the scouts i learned how to make what we called hobo dinners. some vegetables, some kind of meat (taking any guns with you?), seasoning/sauce, other random stuff, all wrapped in some foil. throw it IN the fire for a while. but i dont really do that anymore after i finished scouting.

one thing you MUST take is those packs of the blueberry cheese cake its a real treat after a long day.

beef jerky is awesome it keeps your mind off how much your feet hurt.
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Unread 06-17-2012, 01:55 AM   #8
phitmein
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" one thing you MUST take is those packs of the blueberry cheese cake its a real treat after a long day "

Didn't Yogi Bear say that once upon a time ?

Mmm blueberry, my favorite .

I wondered about the needs of a bear cache too .

But we are only talking about black bears here right .

I joke, bears don't .

Phit
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Unread 06-18-2012, 10:16 AM   #9
ruggedscotsman
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First off, if your pot has a lid you can use that as a skillet when needed.

As for dehydrated food, I've had good luck with the Natural High and Mountain House brands...although the spicey ones can be a little too salty sometimes.

For trail lunches, I'm a big fan of salami and cheese sandwiches with pita or tortilla. If you bring a nice stick of dry cured salami it will keep well for a few days, no problem. I also usually have a soup/pasta mix option in case the weather sucks and I want something to warm up. The folks who said beef jerky are right, it tastes great and keeps your salts up when you're sweating under the weight of a pack.

For breakfast/dinner I usually try to avoid the fresh veggies like potatoes etc due to weight. I'm all for having a big fat dinner at the start of the trip (steak/veggies/beers) but it adds too much weight and doesn't keep well for the long haul trips. There are lots of dry options that work well (pasta, quinoa, couscous, barley etc) and you can add a small amount of fresh ingredients to make it interesting. Dry chicken/beef/veg stock will go a long way towards making a meal that much more appetizing.

Also, Nalgene water bottles work well for mixing and freezing ingredients ahead of time. A dozen eggs will fit in a 1 litre water bottle so they can be frozen the night before the trip. This way you can have fresh scrambled eggs on the second morning without worrying about breaking or spoiling them...
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Unread 06-18-2012, 10:24 AM   #10
aedwards606
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My boyfriend and I went backpacking last summer. Most of the food we ate was either something like little cans of tuna mixed with some pasta and mayo packets. This was then put into some pita. When we had some non canned meat, we vaccum sealed it in plastic bags and froze it until the day we left for the trip.
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Unread 06-18-2012, 12:34 PM   #11
IslandHopper
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I like Cliff Bars and the Nature Valley granola bars... along with some raisins or dried fruit and M&M's... a person could live for a loooong time off of that stuff
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Unread 06-18-2012, 01:26 PM   #12
MountainMan864
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kous kous and lentils. all you need. and some crackers.
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Unread 06-18-2012, 01:32 PM   #13
Timothy_90
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Good advice so far guys. Most of my friends going on this little trip with me have spent little to no time in the back country and it's my experience that good food can make or break a persons first backpacking experience. There's nothing like sitting down next to the campfire after a day of hiking to enjoy a good dinner.

I think for dinner I'm going to try to do some good comfort-type food. Some form of pasta that I can add chicken to or maybe some pepperoni (since I think both of those come packaged in a way that doesn't need refrigeration), though I'm not sure what yet. Tomato sauce may be a little inconvenient though. I suppose I could do a cheese based sauce but most of those require milk and butter, milk is easy because it's readily available as a powder, not sure about butter though- again, I think if I freeze it before hand, salted butter won't go bad THAT quickly but maybe I'm dead wrong so if someone could chime in there I'd appreciate it.

For breakfast, oatmeal sounds like a good option, with some scrambled eggs to go along with it since they are also available in powder form. Lunch the first day could be cheese quesadillas (cheese shouldn't go bad that fast), I could utilize the vast quantity of taco bell sauces in my fridge to season them. And we may just snack on the way out, meaning some clif bars and trail mix or something and we'll just stop at a restaurant on the drive home.

The vast majority of my backcountry time has been in the winter, when you don't have to worry about bringing refrigerated things on the trail because it's cold enough to keep stuff from going bad, so this middle of summer trip is making me think about stuff I didn't have to think about before.

After looking at the commercial freeze dried stuff, it's more expensive than I remember.
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Unread 06-18-2012, 02:55 PM   #14
ruggedscotsman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Timothy_90 View Post
Good advice so far guys. Most of my friends going on this little trip with me have spent little to no time in the back country and it's my experience that good food can make or break a persons first backpacking experience. There's nothing like sitting down next to the campfire after a day of hiking to enjoy a good dinner.

I think for dinner I'm going to try to do some good comfort-type food. Some form of pasta that I can add chicken to or maybe some pepperoni (since I think both of those come packaged in a way that doesn't need refrigeration), though I'm not sure what yet. Tomato sauce may be a little inconvenient though. I suppose I could do a cheese based sauce but most of those require milk and butter, milk is easy because it's readily available as a powder, not sure about butter though- again, I think if I freeze it before hand, salted butter won't go bad THAT quickly but maybe I'm dead wrong so if someone could chime in there I'd appreciate it.

For breakfast, oatmeal sounds like a good option, with some scrambled eggs to go along with it since they are also available in powder form. Lunch the first day could be cheese quesadillas (cheese shouldn't go bad that fast), I could utilize the vast quantity of taco bell sauces in my fridge to season them. And we may just snack on the way out, meaning some clif bars and trail mix or something and we'll just stop at a restaurant on the drive home.

The vast majority of my backcountry time has been in the winter, when you don't have to worry about bringing refrigerated things on the trail because it's cold enough to keep stuff from going bad, so this middle of summer trip is making me think about stuff I didn't have to think about before.

After looking at the commercial freeze dried stuff, it's more expensive than I remember.
A small tin of tomatoe paste can be creatively turned into a wicked tomatoe sauce. Cheese sauce? Get a pack of the extra creamy Mac n' Cheese, substitue own noodles. Dried ingredients are great for adding to sauces as well. For a really yummy pasta, try the dried alfredo mixes that are 'just add water' and add some extra things like microwave-bacon and dried mushrooms. Last but not least Cheese will keep for about three or four days out of the fridge. The harder/older the cheese, the longer it will keep.

have fun!
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Unread 06-18-2012, 03:06 PM   #15
4x4Jeep
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i'm a subscriber to Backpacker and they have some decent recipes: http://www.backpacker.com/article/to...le&tag=recipes

also i like to take oatmeal for breakfast and a packet of rice or a can of tuna for dinner. when i'm out hiking we don't stop to eat lunch, instead just snack, like energy or granola bars. i like to take things that weigh the least as possible. i used to take MRE's with me, but they are just too bulky.
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