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Unread 08-08-2014, 01:29 PM   #31
Cause
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Originally Posted by gregstudeny View Post
I like your style. If I didn't have two kids to support and the funds for the bike I would consider it.
Sell the rug rats for the bike!

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Unread 08-08-2014, 01:39 PM   #32
gregstudeny
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The price for child has went down too much due to the flood of illegal immigrant children. They flooded the market
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Unread 08-08-2014, 05:40 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by gregstudeny View Post
The price for child has went down too much due to the flood of illegal immigrant children. They flooded the market




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Unread 08-08-2014, 06:34 PM   #34
pentastarguy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cause View Post
OK, stop with all the krap 'Nancy advice'...

Get yourself a Suzuki Hayabusa (GSX 1300R), put on a pair of shorts, tee shirt, and a pair of those cheap k-mart foam sole flip-flops... and take off. Head for the first Interstate you can jet to and open that thing UP... rated to up to over 240 mph, find out if it will do it and if you got the stones to hang on.... you may choose to opt for a pair of sunglasses!
^^ get some real street cred, or you'll be known as PeeWeeHerman!!!!!



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t_ttKSUYhps
i would refer you to your "rule #1"....
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Unread 08-08-2014, 08:59 PM   #35
Tollster
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There are a lot of various reasons people ride, therefore, choosing your first bike can be hit or miss until you decide why you ride, then as you gain more experience, you'll be more apt to pick the one best suited for your habits and personality.
I would not spend a lot of money on it, likely I would check the used market as other have mentioned, its flooded.
Gear is important, namely a good set of boots, jacket, gloves, and helmet. I know many have mentioned full face, but keep in mind, with out a neck restraint, full face helmets carry a lot of weight Unless its some like an Arai. There is a higher potential for serious neck injuries with heavier full face helmets. This may be controversial, but still, keep it in mind.
Things have dramatically changed for the average rider over the past 40 years, we have seen the introduction of radiused tires, which help in lean angle, silicone impregnated rubber for grip and so on, but the hazards on road are higher than ever with more people in a rush, and being preoccupied, namely cell phones. Always see every car as a threat, and always have a plan "B", this can be at cross traffic intersections and so on, learn to see danger, and plan ahead. (If you have to think about it, you're too late.. it will come to you the more you ride, and soon be second nature, you'll be able spot a quarter on the highway at 55 if its in your lane of travel!)
I'm on my 24 th bike since 1974, and have 3 steeds in the garage as we speak, (different uses) I have been down on pavement 3 times, and walked away each time, fared worst in the dirt, concussions, stitches, broken bones and more jammed thumbs than I care to think about.
Your dirt bike experience is the most valuable thing you can possess, before moving to the street, you've learned "where you look is where you go, body English, and hopefully how to fall. All critical before hitting the road.
When you check out gear, be sure to check out http://www.webbikeworld.com/ for reviews that are non biased. And always get the best you can afford.
My first street bike was a 75 Kawi H1 triple, I was 16... I can say..I survived, and I still crack a ear to ear grin when I think of that machine.

A few more catchy phrases from over the years.

"Its not how fast you go, its how you go fast"
"turn on the gas dummy"
"If ya can't afford the fine, take the lead"
"When in doubt, gas it" ( This one has saved my hide more than once, and it may sound crazy, but 10 to 1, you have better experience under hard acceleration than hard braking).
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Unread 08-08-2014, 10:25 PM   #36
gregstudeny
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Thanks. I was looking for an unbiased site. The bike will be mainly for riding back roads. I will try to avoid highways for a while. I'm really considering the Suzuki tu250x. Its very cheap even new and had good reviews expect by people who want more top speed and acceleration. I have a tj so I'm use to slow and easy.
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Unread 08-09-2014, 08:22 AM   #37
pentastarguy
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slow and easy can at times be worse than extreme speed where you just hang on. i always want access to to power to get of certain situations, usually involving other vehicles that don't see you.
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Unread 08-09-2014, 08:31 AM   #38
Tollster
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pentastarguy View Post
slow and easy can at times be worse than extreme speed where you just hang on. i always want access to to power to get of certain situations, usually involving other vehicles that don't see you.

Hes riding in Texas, not Jersay... A very, very, different world for a motorcyclist..
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Unread 08-09-2014, 12:39 PM   #39
TheWorstKind
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To the OP: lots of good advice given here. I'll toss in my two cents here, too!

Someone already stated: "Dress for the crash, not the ride." That is the best advise.

As far as to what bike, that is a tough one. As a Motorcycle Safety Foundation rider coach, I highly recommend a bike that fits. Height is important, but not the most important. Rather, being able to comfortable reach the hand and foot controls is #1 in my book. Some bikes have adjustable levers, some don't. Aftermarket is always an option if the "Chosen Machine" does not have adjustable levers. For a beginner, light weight is more important than small engine.

Somebody mentioned that dual sports are harder to handle compared to other street bikes. I respectfully disagree. Dual sports have an upright riding position with wide handlebars, resulting in excellent control by the rider, as well as all-day acceptable comfort.

Being that we are on a Jeep forum, I assume you do some off-roading. A Suzuki DR 650 or a Kawasaki KLR 650 would make a great first bike. Both are dual sports, and VERY tough - falling over probably will not mean the end of a ride. The DR is lighter, air cooled, and a bit more dirt oriented. The KLR is a little heavier, water cooled, and slants a bit more to street use than dirt. Both are fine on either surface. The aftermarket support is stupendous for both bikes. If money is no hurdle, KTM and BMW also make great dual purpose bikes.

In my humble opinion, the TU 250 is a great bike for a couple of days at the MSF class, but beyond that, it just isn't build for the open road.

Gear recommendations (for Texas in particular):

Arai XD-4 or Shoei Hornet (never buy a used helmet)

Jacket and pants: buy something that is made with at least 1000 denier cordura (DuPont cordura, not cheap Chinese imitation). Please be aware that many clothing manufacturers advertise 600 D or super ballistic crap material 1000D. It needs to be cordura. Kevlar, interwoven with some Schoeller k-protect, is even better. Know that your jacket and pants must provide impact protection (armor), tear (good stitching) resistance, and abrasion resistance. Denim sucks, and it causes the rider's body to tumble in a crash - undesirable!

Gloves: motoport sport gloves made from stretch Kevlar. Best in the world, bar none.

Boots: Alpine Stars and Sidi come to mind. Both make boots that are protective, yet all day walking comfortable. The more protective a boot is, the less comfortable it will be to walk in.
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Unread 08-09-2014, 05:41 PM   #40
Tollster
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Originally Posted by TheWorstKind View Post
To the OP: lots of good advice given here. I'll toss in my two cents here, too!

Someone already stated: "Dress for the crash, not the ride." That is the best advise.

As far as to what bike, that is a tough one. As a Motorcycle Safety Foundation rider coach, I highly recommend a bike that fits. Height is important, but not the most important. Rather, being able to comfortable reach the hand and foot controls is #1 in my book. Some bikes have adjustable levers, some don't. Aftermarket is always an option if the "Chosen Machine" does not have adjustable levers. For a beginner, light weight is more important than small engine.

Somebody mentioned that dual sports are harder to handle compared to other street bikes. I respectfully disagree. Dual sports have an upright riding position with wide handlebars, resulting in excellent control by the rider, as well as all-day acceptable comfort.

Being that we are on a Jeep forum, I assume you do some off-roading. A Suzuki DR 650 or a Kawasaki KLR 650 would make a great first bike. Both are dual sports, and VERY tough - falling over probably will not mean the end of a ride. The DR is lighter, air cooled, and a bit more dirt oriented. The KLR is a little heavier, water cooled, and slants a bit more to street use than dirt. Both are fine on either surface. The aftermarket support is stupendous for both bikes. If money is no hurdle, KTM and BMW also make great dual purpose bikes.

In my humble opinion, the TU 250 is a great bike for a couple of days at the MSF class, but beyond that, it just isn't build for the open road.

Gear recommendations (for Texas in particular):

Arai XD-4 or Shoei Hornet (never buy a used helmet)

Jacket and pants: buy something that is made with at least 1000 denier cordura (DuPont cordura, not cheap Chinese imitation). Please be aware that many clothing manufacturers advertise 600 D or super ballistic crap material 1000D. It needs to be cordura. Kevlar, interwoven with some Schoeller k-protect, is even better. Know that your jacket and pants must provide impact protection (armor), tear (good stitching) resistance, and abrasion resistance. Denim sucks, and it causes the rider's body to tumble in a crash - undesirable!

Gloves: motoport sport gloves made from stretch Kevlar. Best in the world, bar none.

Boots: Alpine Stars and Sidi come to mind. Both make boots that are protective, yet all day walking comfortable. The more protective a boot is, the less comfortable it will be to walk in.
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Unread 08-09-2014, 07:15 PM   #41
KHoff90
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheWorstKind View Post
To the OP: lots of good advice given here. I'll toss in my two cents here, too!

Someone already stated: "Dress for the crash, not the ride." That is the best advise.

As far as to what bike, that is a tough one. As a Motorcycle Safety Foundation rider coach, I highly recommend a bike that fits. Height is important, but not the most important. Rather, being able to comfortable reach the hand and foot controls is #1 in my book. Some bikes have adjustable levers, some don't. Aftermarket is always an option if the "Chosen Machine" does not have adjustable levers. For a beginner, light weight is more important than small engine.

Somebody mentioned that dual sports are harder to handle compared to other street bikes. I respectfully disagree. Dual sports have an upright riding position with wide handlebars, resulting in excellent control by the rider, as well as all-day acceptable comfort.

Being that we are on a Jeep forum, I assume you do some off-roading. A Suzuki DR 650 or a Kawasaki KLR 650 would make a great first bike. Both are dual sports, and VERY tough - falling over probably will not mean the end of a ride. The DR is lighter, air cooled, and a bit more dirt oriented. The KLR is a little heavier, water cooled, and slants a bit more to street use than dirt. Both are fine on either surface. The aftermarket support is stupendous for both bikes. If money is no hurdle, KTM and BMW also make great dual purpose bikes.

In my humble opinion, the TU 250 is a great bike for a couple of days at the MSF class, but beyond that, it just isn't build for the open road.

Gear recommendations (for Texas in particular):

Arai XD-4 or Shoei Hornet (never buy a used helmet)

Jacket and pants: buy something that is made with at least 1000 denier cordura (DuPont cordura, not cheap Chinese imitation). Please be aware that many clothing manufacturers advertise 600 D or super ballistic crap material 1000D. It needs to be cordura. Kevlar, interwoven with some Schoeller k-protect, is even better. Know that your jacket and pants must provide impact protection (armor), tear (good stitching) resistance, and abrasion resistance. Denim sucks, and it causes the rider's body to tumble in a crash - undesirable!

Gloves: motoport sport gloves made from stretch Kevlar. Best in the world, bar none.

Boots: Alpine Stars and Sidi come to mind. Both make boots that are protective, yet all day walking comfortable. The more protective a boot is, the less comfortable it will be to walk in.
As someone who has just completed their first riding day with an MSF training course, thank you! Some great advice here
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Unread 08-10-2014, 01:51 PM   #42
jeepdaddy2000
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Quote:
Somebody mentioned that dual sports are harder to handle compared to other street bikes. I respectfully disagree. Dual sports have an upright riding position with wide handlebars, resulting in excellent control by the rider, as well as all-day acceptable comfort.
That would be me..
Dual sports offer a better field of view (already mentioned) but do have some drawbacks for on road riding(compaired to pure street bikes).
They're riding stance is taller and they tend to be lighter than their on street counterparts. This means their CG is a lot higher, resulting in a lessened ability to deal with emergency manauvers and remain upright. They also are much more prone to "push" from passing trucks and other large vehicles.
Don't misunderstand me, I really like dual sports, I love their versitility and, as an experienced dirt bike (as well as street bike) rider, find them an enjoyable compromise due to their flexability, but for overall ability on the pavement, a street bike would get the edge.

One quick thing on the seat height...
My wife purchased a 650 nighthawk back in the day. Beautiful bike. She loved it, but was forced to sell due to having to "tippy toe" at stop lights. While most street bikes have lower seat heights, it is inportant that one can comfortably stabilize the bike at rest (another issue that can rear it's head with dual sports).

Just my humble .02....
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Unread 08-11-2014, 05:31 PM   #43
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Don't forget to factor in insurance when deciding what bike to get. This can vary significantly from one bike to the next.

I just got my first bike a couple months ago. I still have a lot to learn but it's been a blast so far. Going from my TJ at 15-16 mpg to a bike that gets 4 times better fuel economy has been a bonus as well.
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Unread 08-14-2014, 07:39 PM   #44
Shadownwpa
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I grew up riding atvs and dirtbikes.. so it wasn't too hard to pick up when I moved to asphalt.

My first was an XR650L.. good bike, reliable, nice to learn on with upright riding position and good visibility. The dual sport tires were skinny and a soft compound that wears out quickly and isn't the best in the rain. It had good power that was acceptable for the interstate (short rides since the seat kinda sucked), but wasn't crazy fast like the hayabusa. This one got traded in plus $500 for -

the next bike - 2003 Shadow A.C.E. 750. I had to get something lower with a better seat and softer ride when I had a hip replaced (at 25years old, so this isn't coming from a geezer). I put alot of miles on this one, it's a solid bike - very reliable. I geared it with a smaller sprocket in the back for better highway riding. It got better that 55mpg, had wide tires, easy to shift, and looked very nice. I moved the controls forward to make it better for my height and I put a case on the back so I could commute on it. I'd absolutely recommend something like this or the XR for a beginner. Less is engine is better if you have no experience and have no intention of doing any serious riding in the near future.. the 200 dualsport you mention might get up to 65 on a downhill with a midget riding it - you'll get sick of that in a hurry. I had to get rid of this bike once the insurance said it was totaled - someone stopped to wait as I passed oncoming on a two lane road, a kid driving up behind the people didn't notice they were stopped until it was too late so they skidded out into my lane. I got sideways and headed for the ditch enough the car struck right below my left thigh- right behind the knee. I flew, landed on my side, the helmet kept my ear attached to my head as I slid down the berm. I was wearing a golf shirt, jeans, and my workboots. The ER picking gravel out of the wounds convinced me to try for better gear, be more strict with myself on actually using it, etc. It wasn't too bad though, aside from the road rash it was mostly pain from bruised ribs and soreness in my bad hip.

So - no. riding gear is not just a fashion statement like someone mentioned earlier in the thread.

Anyways after the wreck I had a decent check from my insurance with which to go get another bike. The first one I test rode a week after the wreck was a Hayabusa.. incredible bike, stupid fast, way too much fun. I didn't get it because I planned to use it for work and it would look weird with a top case, that and the $1,800 a year insurance. I had been wanting a more powerful bike of the sport touring variety even before the wreck so it turned out well when I found a 2005 Suzuki DL1000 V-Strom. It's considered an 'adventure bike' - has an v-twin engine similar to a TL1000, SV, and that sort, but tuned for torque, comes with 90/10 dual sport tires, a suspension good enough for fire roads and light trails. It's like if a goldwing and a dirtbike had a baby.. this would be it. It's probably not the best for a first bike, but it's versatile, you can mount various types of luggage on it (I have a custom bracket and 20mm ammo cans on mine). The smaller version is a 650.. if you're better than 6' tall this would be a decent beginner bike if you were careful, and you might never feel the need to get a different bike (unless you just want speed or to look fancy. Stroms are listed in one of the other posts above as a sport bike - it's really not. It can be a sport touring bike, or an 'ADV' bike, or some people strip them and make them a naked bike with knobbies but on the most basic level they're a standard bike with upright seating and your pegs under your knees, not tucked up in like a sport bike. I had a Katana for a bit after a horse got in my way one day on the way to work on the strom.. katana's are junk. Some people like them - but they might just not know any better.

To sum it up, get something tame but not tiny. If you get a sport bike - know it's going to probably be uncomfortable and have poor visibility. If you get a cruiser make sure you check the aftermarket first if you're planning to customize it at all - a buddy has a suzuki S50 and can't find crap for it. You should also consider what you're gonna use it for. If you're going to commute or haul a woman you need luggage, if you have luggage you can use it for other stuff like going to the store for jeep parts or groceries (or beer).. some bikes are more suitable than others. Get a jacket, helmet, gloves, boots (workboots work fine), and if you want to go a little extra get the pants to go with the jacket. For San Antonio you should look at air-mesh jacket and pants.. they would probably work year-round for you.. In the summer here I use a Cortech 3.0 jacket and tourmaster riding pants kinda like these.
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Unread 08-15-2014, 10:41 PM   #45
pentastarguy
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tollster......true true true, riding is a bit different here.
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