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Unread 12-02-2005, 09:23 PM   #1
cavebiker
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6 months wheeling through Mexico - YJ90'

Mexico 05': A journal of Heidi & Tomís South of the Border Jeep Adventures 2005í

The Adventure: We plan to start off driving our 1990 Jeep Wrangler down Mexico's Baja paninsulia then ferrying over to the Mexico mainland. The plan is 9 months touring Mexico, Guatemala and Belize. Our goal and mission is to find some place on a beach to rent long term where thereís surfing and a gym close by. From there we plan to go off on excursions to places undiscovered.

I'm done with my full time job for at least 9 months and I canít believe it! Itís really happening. Here we go!
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Update: 01/10/05 Guerrero Negro, Baja Mexico

Heidi & I took off from Wis. Tuesday Dec 28 and made a bee line south.



FREE drinks:

We were shooting for Santa Fe New Mexico for New Years eve and maybe look up Tim, a new friend I met at the Horizons unlimited motorcycle event in Creel Mexico. Our goal is not to do any driving after dark and enjoy being on the road as much as possible. Our first night on the road we stayed in Iowa Falls, Iowa, nothing to report. On our second night we made it to Wichita, KS. Heidi & I took a cheap room at the motel 6. After getting settled we wandered across the street to a fancy hotel in search of a bar. At the bar I ordered a couple of cocktails then tried to pay. The bartender said I need to get some drink tickets at the front desk (The bar is for hotel guests only and drinks are free). I worked in the resort hotel business all through high school and college so I know the ropes, go with the flow and act like you own the place and nobody will notice. Itís not that Iím too cheap to pay for our drinks but the bartender wouldnít take any money and to me this is fun! We stood in the bar drinking our drinks then met a couple from Austin, TX, Heidi & Dale. Fun, fun people, we had a lively conversation and received and invitation for a New Years eve party and a place to stay in Austin, unreal! The four of us walked to a restaurant next door to have some food. Before we knew it we had a group of about eleven people. Four others I made some small talk with at the hotel bar while I was waiting for the bartender to make drinks and the others I think owned the restaurant. Man we lit that place up! It was like we were all best friends that havenít seen each other for a long time. One of the guys had some unreal stories that I could fill pages with. Super fun, what a way to start our trip, a huge social adventure.

Well, Austin was out of our way so we had to decline their offer. We had numerous other offers for places to stay from people I met at the horizonsunlimited motorcycle event in Creel Mexico. I canít get over how warm and friendly people you meet on the road can be.



When we drove into New Mexico and looked north at the snow covered mountains I turned to Heidi and said ďdo we really want to go up into the snow again?Ē We instantly changed our plans and decided to look for a new destination for New Years further south. We made it to Alamogordo, NM where we stayed at a nice little cheap motel for two days. We had a list of things we still needed to get and do, so it was nice to chill a bit and take care of business. Next we drove to Tucson, AZ. I still needed to get new tires and a battery for the jeep plus my screen on my laptop went bad. I need a computer.

One night in Tucson, we got 4 Mud Terrain tires put on, a new 96 month battery and oil change, sweet! We planned to cross the border at Mexicali Mexico so Yuma AZ looked liked a good place to stage and take care of last minute things. In Tucson I had a technician look at my laptop, things didnít look good. In Yuma we stayed just across the street from a Best Buy store where I picked up a 15Ē flat screen monitor for under $200. Not ideal but Iím back up with all my software running. I have an AC power converter for the jeep so I can still compute even when weíre camping on the beach. At the motel in Yuma I plugged the laptop into the phone jack and clicked on NetZero. Sweet, it fired up even though I donít have an account with them any more, thanks NetZero! It was fun emailing all my friends with an update on our trip and the link to our new web site, www.justadventuretravel.net .

Mexico:

From Yuma we made it to the border in no time. This is my fourth time driving into Mexico so I know the procedure, all went smooth, weíre in the Baja! Itís only a little over a hundred miles to San Felipe, our first destination in Mexico. In route I saw a few dune buggies cruising next to us in the dirt so of course I had to jump in behind them just for the fun factor!





San Felipe is great, itís the first American tourist destination in Mexico Iíve been to. I didnít like it that most people we ran into spoke English but I guess thatís the way it is in the Baja. Iíve conditioned myself over the years to never speak English when talking to Mexicans in Mexico but it felt weird when they spoke English to me.



Heidi & I rented a little cabin with a fireplace stove and fridge and private parking right outside the door for $35 a night, we took two nights. We had a short mile walk to the malecon, super fun. Iíve read about the fish tacos being to die for here. Itís true, they are unreal.



We had a great time playing tourist, walking, eating, drinking and looking at all the shops. I bought a Baja off road racing decal and received a free shot of tequila for the purchase, what a deal!



Ok, when in Mexico and on a budget here are some things that are often norm. When we got back to out little cabin the temperature dropped significantly, we were frozen. Only being a hundred and some miles south of the border I didnít expect it to be hot yet but a cold front was upon us and there was no heat in our cabin, burr! We had a gas stove so great, a heat source, but NO, no gas. There were 9 cabins and one standard sized hot water heater for all and it was situated just outside our cabin. We were the only ones staying there that night so I went to plan B, blast on the showers hot water spraying it up as much as possible to steam up the room. This usually does the trick to take the chill out of the room but not this time. We had lukewarm water for about a minute then nothing. It was late and no one around to ask about a source of fire wood so go to plan C, get out the long johns and sleeping bags. We were cozy warm in the bed but it must have been 40 deg. F in that cabin that night. Heidi never whined once, what a girl! We had another night to go and I needed to do something, it was not comfortable anywhere but under the covers. First thing in the morning I went to search out the source of gas for the stove. I found a shut off valve crammed behind the hot water heater just outside the cabin. Yes, bingo, I had four burners on the stove going and the bite was taken out of the room before Heidi got out of bed, Iím the hero! OK Iím liken this so I go out to tackle the hot water heater. Instantly I see why we had some warm water, the pilot light was burning but that was it. I fiddle around with the controls then kill the pilot, crap. I get a lighter, stick my hand inside the bottom of the heater where I saw the flame then flick the lighter, BAM! The pilot shut off mechanism was obviously not working, probably because the thing was sitting outside in the rain and salt sea air. I cut my wrist top and bottom yanking my hand out of the thing and singed the sleeve of my long johns. Anyway I got the water heater going full blast and found a ton of fire wood next door in a vacant lot, we were cooking and had a great second day in Mexico.




Last edited by cavebiker; 12-15-2005 at 06:24 AM.. Reason: clean
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Unread 12-02-2005, 09:27 PM   #2
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Continued:

After San Felipe we had two choices for going south into Baja. We could go back 150 miles north on a good road and catch the paved highway 1 south or we could continue south on the Baja 1000 race course for 150 miles of dirt road then connect to highway 1. The word "Baja" has been in my vocabulary every since I was a kid and it meant to me off road racing and tough off road terrain. I always loved going off road in northern Wisconsin and when I hit the rough stuff the word ďBaja!Ē always came out of my mouth. The guide book said you will see a part of the Baja that you canít see any other way by doing the dirt road south. Heidi didnít like the idea of going 300 extra miles just to get to a bland nice paved road, again what a girl! We have the Jeep, I just installed new extra heavy duty springs and shocks and new mud terrain tires. Baja 1000 race course here we come!



We're hammer along getting our teeth rattled out of their sockets but great scenery. A new friend, Art who I met at the horizons unlimited motorcycle event in Creel Mexico suggested taking some air out of the tires. It helped but the stiff suspension was a killer. All of a sudden we see a dune buggy racing toward us going super fast. It had what looked like 50Ē tires sticking way out and springs on each tire at least 5 feet tall. When it passed we could see the driver and passenger had big 70í style head phones on. I imagined them jamming loud rock and roll and having a blast. Heidi & I looked at each other for about a nanosecond, we grabbed our case of tunes and popped in ďDance ExtremeĒ and cranked it! WOW, in an instant Iím living the dream. Weíre racing along the Baja jamming tunes and seeing stuff Iíve only dreamed of. Iím having a difficult time keeping my eyes dry.








To be continued:

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Unread 12-02-2005, 09:29 PM   #3
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Update: 01/15/05 Lareto, Baja Mexico

After San Felipe we stayed at Alfonsinaís resort and had a room over looking a beautiful bay on the sea of Cortez. A little expensive, $50 US but the service and food great. Antonio made us feel like we were at home. We woke up in the morning with an unreal orange sunrise filling the bay. I parked myself on the deck with a book and the next thing I see are a half of dozen dolphins playing around the bay where a fisherman was reeling in a giant fish net. I felt like I was in a dream.





More Baja 1000 fun!



This is Coco at his place in literally the middle of nowhere. Coco lost a leg in an accident years ago and now lives here right on the Baja 1000 race course. Coco serves cold beer and has lots of funny stories and information. We mentioned meeting Memo the day before at the Cowpatty bar. Memo is a big bicycler, every year when itís too hot he shuts down the bar and rides his bike south. Last year he made it to San Salvador. Memo stays with Coco on his way south and helps him out with repairs. Coco was saying how much Tequila he drinks having 3 liters strapped on his bike when he rides with a tube running into his mouth. Funny, I could go on and on but Iím sure you get the idea. True or false Iím not sure? For sure Memo is a real hard core biker.



Coco said this is for mosquito control, ha ha ha.

This is Memo at the Cowpatty bar.



Later that day we continue south through constantly changing scenery, every mile getting more dramatic and exotic, seeing elephant trees and giant cacti. Finely we hit paved highway 1 heading south to Guerrero Negro, a nice little sea side city on the Pacific, about 10,000 people. This is a popular whale watching spot where the whales come every year to bare their young. The whales come into the big bays outside of town and chase out all other fish and guard the bay entrances from any fish coming inside so the young newborn calfís can be safe, wow. Fun little town, we stayed two nights and had a ball.


The guide book said, south of Guerrero Negro, on the sea of Cortez are several campoís along beautiful beaches. A campo is an area where you can park your RV or pitch a tent for a small fee, around $6 a night and thereís usually a restaurant or store on the grounds. The first one we pulled into was said to be the most popular for windsurfers. I imagined tons of tents and cars with windsurfers on top but when we got there all I saw were RVís and no surfboards. It was low tide and the beach didnít look ideal so we continued down the coast. The next beach / campo is said to be the most beautiful and popular.



The sand was perfect the bay was idyllic but the prime spots were all taken by RVís, many looking like they are permanent. We drove to the end of the beach on one side turned around and went to the end of the beach on the other. I thought the road dead ended at some homes but I could see a small rough looking path leading further over a hill. We have the Jeep, we're jacked up with gnarly tires so here we go. We climb over the hill and the view in front of us explodes to the sight of a deserted desert beach on a bay surrounded by colorful rocky hills. The beach was about a mile long on a bay 5 miles long by 5 miles wide, this was the windsurfing bay. We could barely see the first campo we came to on the other side of the bay, besides that nothing. I felt like I just woke up and found myself in paradise. Heidi & I look at each other with a ďO my gosh, can you believe this?Ē look. We were loosing sun so I get out the tent while Heidi prepares cocktails.



The beach was littered with millions and millions of beautiful sea shells. I was feeling super large and felt this was the time to break out one of the Dominican Republic cigars my brother Pat gave me for Christmas. My next mission was to find the perfect cigar ashtray. It took only seconds to find one. Thanks Bro!


Last edited by cavebiker; 12-15-2005 at 06:27 AM.. Reason: clean
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Unread 12-02-2005, 09:32 PM   #4
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To Be Continued:

Heidi has never been one to rough it much so I was determined to show her how good it can be. I bought an 8 person tent with a 6 foot screened ceiling, enough room for two extra large cots, two lawn chairs with foot rests, a cooler and still enough room to cook. Weíre liken it!

That night the moon went down by the time it was dark. We always thought we could see tons of stars at our cabin in northern Wisconsin but here it seemed like there were 100 times more, it was unreal, we felt like we were on another planet. I purposely pitched the tent less then ten yards from the high tide mark. All night we listened to the gentle wave break coming closer and closer.



After a little research we discovered this entire bay is a national marine preserve and is reportedly one of the cleanest in the world! We felt like we were watching a National Geographic special. All around us were sea gulls, frigates, pelicans, hawks and blue-footed boobies just feet from our tent. The gulls would pick up a clam, take off flying straight up about 50 feet high then drop it on rocks below. It usually took about 3 or 4 tries before the gulls would start feasting on the clam. We couldnít look out into the bay without seeing frigates or hawks dive bombing into the water. They would start at about 100 feet and go straight in causing a splash that shot up about 4 feet high. The hawks would come right back up out of the water but the frigates would coil back their wings just before hitting the water and stay under water sometimes for a long time. Hawks were constantly circling low around the cactus and shrubs near us, often we would see one carrying a rodent or sitting on the tip of a cactus eating a fish or whatever. Iím not kidding this was going on constantly. We couldnít look up or out without seeing one or several of these sights all at once.



The main beach where all the RVís were had some permanent looking structures surrounding an RV or two. This one was for sale for $8,000 US. All you need to pay after that is the $6 per night fee, about $2,000 a year and itís yours for life, as long as you pay the fee. I want to contact my main windsurfing friends Tim and Connie to see if they want to go in half on the place. Two out of the three days we were there the winds were cranking in the windsurf part of the bay.



Along the road further south we saw scenes like this constantly.



We got an email tip from Warren who just did the Baja 1000 race on a motorcycle. He gave us several recommended places to check out and knowing Warren I thought it would be foolish to pass them up. The first place on our route was Loreto and a gringo happy hour bar on the maleícon. What a tip! We met so many people. Weíre invited to a goat roast party tonight and met two sailing couples each on a boat parked just across the street from our hotel. One couple, Deanna and Roy sailed across the Sea of Cortez in a huge storm a week ago surfing down 20 foot waves. They were up for 46 hours straight, at one point for two hours they made zero headway due to the heavy seas. Now thatís all one thing but the kicker is they were doing it in a 26 foot MaccGreggor flat bottom swing keel water ballast boat, wow! The other sailing couple, Tammy and Larry just bought a 39 foot something and had their injector pump go out so Deanna and Roy towed them over eighty miles with their 26 footer to where we met them in Loreto. The six of us connected and are all going to the party tonight.

Loreto is a quaint little town with nice street cafťs, cobble stone streets and a university with a gym. We were charged $1.30 to use the gym for the day and I never felt so welcomed in my life to a new gym. Thanks Antonio from Loreto university, your welcoming almost made me choke up.



To be continued:

Last edited by cavebiker; 12-15-2005 at 06:34 AM..
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Unread 12-02-2005, 09:33 PM   #5
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Sunrise from our hotel in Loreto.


Last edited by cavebiker; 12-15-2005 at 06:33 AM.. Reason: oops
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Unread 12-02-2005, 09:36 PM   #6
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To be continued:

Update 1/27/05:
The Party:
OK, the last update I mentioned Heidi and I were headin to a goat roast party in Loreto with Deanna, Roy, Tammy and Larry. Well the party was a real sleeper.



and Deanna, Roy, Tammy and Larry were kind of dull.


and nothing real exciting was going on.



NOT! Everyone at the party welcomed us with open arms and treated us like family. We stayed till the wee hours and all walked home together and partied at the hotel after, Ouch!

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Unread 12-02-2005, 09:40 PM   #7
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We all had plans to meet the next day up the coast at Puerto Escondido and Heidi & I had an invitation to stay the night on Tammy & Larryís sailboat, how nice! About half way down at this pull over, we saw both their boats sailing toward Puerto Escondido. Perfect conditions, I was imagining how great it must have been to be out there on a boat.


Heidi and I didnít like the idea of staying the night out on the bay on a sailboat with all our belongings unguarded on shore so we planned to pitch a tent on the beach and just have another day of fun with the gang. When we arrived at Puerto Escondido we found it to be nothing but a big sailing community with no hotels, no beach or anywhere to pitch a tent. Iím sure the sailors like that.





Tammy & Larry really wanted us to stay on board their sailboat for the night but Iím the captain of my own ship and had to make the call, sail on (drive on) to the next port of call where we will feel good about the jeep. Thanks again Tammy & Larry!

To be continued:

Last edited by cavebiker; 12-15-2005 at 06:37 AM..
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Unread 12-14-2005, 04:02 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cavebiker
Mexico 05': A journal of Heidi & Tomís South of the Border Jeep Adventures 2005í

The Adventure: We plan to start off driving our 1990 Jeep Wrangler down Mexico's Baja paninsulia then ferrying over to the Mexico mainland. The plan is 9 months touring Mexico, Guatemala and Belize. Our goal and mission is to find some place on a beach to rent long term where thereís surfing and a gym close by. From there we plan to go off on excursions to places undiscovered.

I'm done with my full time job for at least 9 months and I canít believe it! Itís really happening. Here we go!
MEXICO, Baby


"Well the good guys and the bad guys, they don't work past noon 'round here."


"They sit side-by-side in the cantinas, talk to senoritas, and drink more beer."

Nice adventure, thanks for the pics. Thanks for the memories. Thanks for the inspiration.

!Salud!
M
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Unread 12-14-2005, 04:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by articulate
Nice adventure, thanks for the pics. Thanks for the memories. Thanks for the inspiration.
thank you and For sure!

Hey, how do you get the photos to show up on the thread like that?
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Unread 12-14-2005, 06:03 PM   #10
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Luggie Man:
Shooting for La Paz, weíre looking for a budget Hotel. The guide book says La Paz has the cheapest hotels in all of Baja. The way we see it the cheaper we stay in one place the more we can afford to live it up in another. But the number one priority for lodging is always overnight Jeep security. It doesnít matter how cheap or expensive the hotel is, if we donít have a good feeling about the Jeep we donít stay. The first place we check out is Hotel Tijuana, a bit seedy but had great parking security with an enclosed courtyard and we were close to the seaside boulevard or malecon. Felix, the owner of the hotel was extremely pleasant and was willing to do anything to make us comfortable and happy. He was always calling me ďmy good friend TombĒ. We planned to spend just one night but Felix said it would be cheaper to stay longer, $38 per night for one night, $22 a night for two. No brainer, we took two. You get what you pay for! Heidi checked the sheets and said they were dirty and had hairs all over them, not from some buddies head. I broke out the sleeping bags. After the superbowl play-off activities in the courtyard finished the guy staying above us (he is a permanent resident of the hotel) was hacking up luggies for close to two hours. The next night around happy hour time he started clanking bottles together and singing loud to 60ís rock and roll that he had blasting. The clanking and singing werenít as bad, it was the luggies that got to Heidi. Glad I was asleep for most of it.

La Paz:
We found La Paz to have everything we like. The malecon is the nicest Iíve ever seen with clean beaches, sailboats and ships in the harbor, hotels, restaurants, bars and cafe's along the street.


Heidi and I like to explore new cities while on foot. We enjoy the aerobic exercise and to us itís the only way to get a good feel for a new place. We spent over six hours walking around and had a ball.









Keeping with the theme of an inspirational web site Iíll keep trying to mention things Heidi and I like to do while traveling. One goal is we like is to return from an adventure in much better shape then when we started. We constantly have our eyes on the lookout for a gym and a way to get the heart pumping. We stumbled on Athons fitness center, a nice little gym and just a short walk from the hotel. I didnít think we could feel more welcome at a new gym then we did at Loretoís University but Luis and everyone at Athons were trying their best. We worked out both days and felt great!



Our plan is do the counter clockwise loop around the Baja Cape Region spending a night or two in Cabo then go back and do a week in La Paz. At La Paz we plan to take a ferry to mainland Mexico and cruise down the Pacific coast.

Todos Santos:
We left La Paz late and are now looking for somewhere to spend the night before Cabo. Todos Santos sounded like a good place, a small village where traditional Mexican families, artists, surfers and refugees from the Hollywood film industry live and hang out. The ride from La Paz was arid cactus desert. We tool into Todos Santos and find ourselves in a lush tropical forest. Palm trees, fruit trees and a big rushing clear stream going through town. We Ö. WillÖ. check this out! We found a hotel first try that had good parking for the jeep. It was a little expensive for us but cheap for most, $46 a night and it is fabulous, sea view, a separate bed room, living room, kitchen with stove, frig and it has a good pool! The family who run and own it are friendly and warm people, always asking us if we need anything, Santa Rosa hotel apartments.



The grounds around the hotel are like a fantasy from some kind of ancient Roman desert ďtropicalí oasis type movie. I keep thinking girls are going to start gathering around offering grapes and stuff.



The unexpected:
After a little research we discovered Todos Santos is world famous for surfing and the best in the Baja with several surf beaches north and south of town. Our room is less then two kilometers from the ocean. Coming through town on our way in I notice a sign for a gym. OK, whatís wrong with this picture? Nothing, this is what we look for. We didnít expect to find a long term destination here in the Baja, but here we are, I canít help it. Weíre sitting along side the pool the first night having cocktails and likin it. The owner Alberto takes over at about 5:00 PM. I could sense Heidi really liked the whole scene and wouldnít mind spending some time here. Talking like Arnold ďI .. Know .. The .. ProcedureĒ I excuse myself to Heidi for a moment and go have a chat with Alberto. I come back and say to Heidi ďWe have a little problem. Weíre stuck here for a month!Ē Life is tough.



Next day we head into town to get supplies for a long term stay. I love eating at Mexican restaurants but I put on a good ten pounds loving all that food on our drive down. Iím behind on a goal. Iím looking forward to doing my own cooking and getting back in shape. We bought an orange press in La Paz, weíre always seeing stands selling bags of oranges. The first turn we take in town, bingo, oranges


To be Continued:
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Unread 12-14-2005, 06:08 PM   #11
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Our next mission is to find the gym and sign up, $23 for a month, Sweet! Thatís Wime working out on the left. HeĎs a college student here on break from Guadalajara University studying international business, perfect, he likes to practice English while we practice Spanish. The gym has everything we need. We were given the combination to the lock so we can go any time and itís only a five block walk from our hotel. Please, nobody wake me up from this dream!.



The next thing I know I find myself in the back of a topless jeep with two babes in control and weíre on our way to the world class surf beach. This is Ruth on the left, she came down for the first time three weeks ago on vacation and has extended her stay because sheís buying a home here to live full time. Ö..OÖ..MyÖ.!



The beach:
The beach extends over 20 miles running north and south of town and NO hotels. Hotel development is banned on this beach.


The wind was up today and wind spoils the waves. Only one person was out. The first time I came here I saw two whales about a half mile away and there were at least twenty or more surfers bobbing in the water. It was like watching a Wide World of Sports TV show. This guy did manage to catch some good long rides though. He may be hard to see, heís the dot on this 10 footer.



We waited for the sunset before heading back.



The next morning before sunrise Iím sitting at the kitchen table typing this up, Iím hearing sounds like a storm rumbling in the background then realize the sounds Iím hearing are huge waves crashing on the beach nearby. Now that Iím going to be a wave surfer dude I have to learn the lingo, ďThe surf is up!Ē Surfers hit the beach early morning before the wind comes up. Wind is Bad, swells are Good. I down my espresso grab the camera and head to the beach.



Scene at the surf beach:



Scene looking out @: Iím using this Ď@í font to symbolize the thumb and the pinkie sticking out and wagging the ĎHang Looseí sign. This is the scene here @. Itís hard to see but these are 15 and sometimes 20 footers. Three or four people were set up on shore with cameras with huge lenses sitting on tripods. I have to get Heidiís big dog lens out here and figure a way to digitize the photos.





TBC:
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Unread 12-14-2005, 06:14 PM   #12
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I still havenít woken up from this dream

OK, OK, OK, I must have been really tired I still havenít woken up from this dream. I decide to just go with it and see how long it lasts. I couldnít believe the deal we got for staying a month so I go have another talk with Alberto. I ask if he could do anything for us if we commit for two months.

Home for the next two months!!!!! It didnít show up but Iím looking out at the Pacific Ocean while typing. I strung up a long wire antenna for my short-wave radio and am enjoying listing to the BBC, Cuba or whatever. I didnít think it was possible but Iím dreaming this in color.



Today I head to the south surf beach about 6 miles away. This beach is the nicest, it has surf shops renting boards and campoís selling beer. Windsurfing shops were usually the best place to buy used equipment in the Caribbean so I ask around at the surf shops about used boards. I came away with some good options. Iím likin life.

Mexican people:
The next morning I head to the south surf beach again. On my way back I head down a dirt path toward a beach thatís closest to our hotel, Heidi and I walked here yesterday. This is an ultimate Baja sand banked and bumpy road with options -=-=-=-=-=-=-= off all going to the same place, the beach. Here is where local fisherman head out and do their thing. Itís Sunday so nobody is out. I could see a couple dune buggies up on the lip of the beach. I was parked on hard sand back about 200 yards, near a palapa shelter.



A local family walked up from the beach and started hanging around the palapa. I look at the beach, stick it into 4-wheel, growl and blast off. I pull up to the lip of the beach where the scene was perfect, waves crashing on the beach and rocks below. A few fishermen were casting off from the rocks to the left on this pic. Some of the guys were using bare line in their hands and pulling it up. At one point I saw three guys all grab onto one bare line and pull.



I looked behind me and see a young girl from the family I saw earlier talking to some people in a dune buggy, I was trying not to pay attention but heard some rapid Spanish speaking from the dune buggy people. I heard a ďNoĒ. A couple minutes later I see in my rear view this girl carrying a huge bundle of wood from a pile of drift wood on the beach. I think she was asking if the people in the buggy would help. OK Iím ready to head back. I noticed I had dug in the sand a lot deeper then those dune buggies floating by, I really had to step it down to keep moving. If youíre a 4-wheeler at all you know the feeling Iím talking here, a type of tightness in your chest and throat knowing you have to do everything to keep it going and not stall out. It all went OK but still, wow. I was going to pick up a bigger pile of wood for the little girl and toss it on top of the jeep rack, but didnít. I thought they were only having a bon fire. Heading back I followed the dune buggy tracks, ahhh! I swing right past the wood pile putting the hammer down feeling good just to get out of there. I tool past the family and couldnít even look at them, feeling I let them down just like the dune buggy people. I smell a fire and see out of the corner of my eye the family preparing a fire under a grill. They must be having a Sunday cookout not a bon fire. I feel like crap, those people need that fire wood to feed their family. ďBajaĒ is in my brain and Iím peeling down the ultimate Baja road. I fire on the brakes, turn the wheel hard and kick it down! I made it up to the wood pile and back once, I can do it again! I cruise past the family and out onto the beach, I whip up the sand hill and turn down and out. I load up a big pile of drift wood, throw it on top and fly out. I pull up near the family and use my most polite Spanish and ask if that would like the wood.




The oldest man came up and thanked me right away in a super gracious manner, after a dozen or so Spanish words I couldnít understand he would come out with a couple in English, like ĎThankÖ..YouÖ.Ē then rattle on looking real sincere. He had no top front teeth but always bore a huge smile, he reminded me of a real Popeye, having strong hands like a fisherman. I tried to scram out of there ASAP, wanting to make it look like it was no big deal which it wasnít, then the older women and older man started coming up to me talking and doing a thumb in the mouth motion. I didnít know what was going on, I felt like I was in the Twilight Zone. I said as politely as I could that I understand very little and it was nothing and I had to go. They thanked me some more, I boogied, we all waved good bye. Whenever I figure out what someone is saying to me itís usually much later after I think about it a bit. Thinking on the way back I imagined them asking me for corn, saying theyíre fisherman and all they eat are fish. Iím like bawling by the time I get home telling Heidi to get ready we have to go back with some of our corn tortillas. Heidi finally settles me down and we talk about what I think they were saying. Daa! They were asking me to eat fish and corn with them, really wanting me to join them. I knew they werenít asking me for anything, I guess I went into hyper overanalyze mode, no, not me, ha, ha. Sunday is a big family day in Mexico and wearing your Sunday best is the norm. What a nice family.

The surf board:
Weíve met a lot of people and got the scoop on where to maybe find a used surfboard. Today we head out early to Cabo San Lucas to get some stuff, have some fun and check it out. Heidi spots a big surf shop along the road between Cabo and San Jose del Cabo.




We first hit the big WalMart (Oops, I guess I should say Target) type store up the road and get essentials for long term tropical living, blender, protein powder, fins, wetsuit, rum. We head back to the Costa Azul surf shop and pull out with a surfboard on top, a Gerry Lopez design. I will look up and find out who that is. Ha, ha (I Ö.. Need Ö.. To ÖÖ Know).



To be Continued:
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Unread 12-14-2005, 06:14 PM   #13
articulate
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Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Dusty borderlands of the Sonoran Desert
Posts: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by cavebiker
thank you and For sure!

Hey, how do you get the photos to show up on the thread like that?
You gotta have yourself 50 posts and be registered for something like 30 days. It's some covert way to see if you're a bonafide internet Jeep-geek and not just a chump with a keyboard and some p0rn pics I suppose.

Make a few more posts in a thread outside of the General forum, and watch the magic happen on your posts above.

Now that we have a little dialog going, I'm in the beginning stages of researching an expedition through Mexico in Summer of 2006. While I've done extensive backpacking in mainland Mexico and another Jeep trip throughout the entirety of the Baja peninsula, I'm searching to see some remote "stuff" of Northern and Central Mexico.

Did you explore much in northern Mexico? Other than major destinations, such as Copper Canyon, what should I see and do? I'd like to visit some old missions, rustic towns, and interesting nature/ecological sites. Would have any input here? It looks like you saw a lot of coastal destinations with watering holes.

I'd like to get your input if you have any...

Gracias,
M
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Unread 12-14-2005, 06:26 PM   #14
cavebiker
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Posts: 126
Wave surfing:

Update 2/07/05: The entire journal starts at -->Mexico 05'.
Wave surfing:
The next day after buying the surfboard I canít wait to get out. I windsurfed the Caribbean in huge breaking waves and I like to think I know what to expect and do around them. As a windsurfer itís ultimate to be riding down a large breaking wave, as a windsurfer it sucks to be hit by a large breaking wave, equipment breaks and youíre not attached. Often you swim a long time chasing your rig and sometimes finding it disabled. What wave surfers do, bob around near breakers waiting for a big one to come, is counter to all my instincts.


Iím off to the so called Ďbeginners beachí where the entire shore is sand, the big dog surfers also come here when the waves are huge. The swells are big today but I have to get wet. I just go with it, strap on the tether line and march out into the breakers. After getting hammered by at least four big ones I get the hang of grabbing onto the surfboard and ducking down just as the breaker is going to nail you. Iím out to sea now bobbing around near where other surfers are bobbing. I practice paddling and catching waves. A wave lands just right, I catch it and go flying. Iím cruising along so I had to try to stand, the board goes flying out from underneath me and I crash backwards in the foam, cool! Iím farther in shore now and farther down the beach. This is where every wave builds and breaks no matter what. Iím getting the -=-=-=-= kicked out of me trying to get back out. Finely I come to my senses and see other surfers walking down the beach toward where I first launched. Lessons learned; paddle out where other surfers paddle out, after riding a wave get on to shore ASAP and start over, that is unless youíre still out far enough and feel lucky and think you can paddle back out without getting creamed. The next thing I do is head back out and paddle near surfers further out. Some guy from California saw I was struggling and gave me several pointers. Great, my paddling speed has increased and Iím a little more confident of what to do just before getting creamed. Iím out for a good hour and manage to not get hammered by any more big waves. Iím feeling good but what a workout.



The next day weíre off to the beach again, same place. I think I know the ropes, paddle out as fast as possible past where most waves start to break. Once there I catch my breath and position myself for a wave. Well, half way out I see a huge one start to build. I donít know what Iím doing and think I have no choice but to ride it. I turned around too soon and didnít see what I was in for. The next thing I know I find myself on the lip of a huge curling wave, Iím up about 8 feet in the air falling straight down with the curl, and Iím lying on a surfboard! The next sensation is hard to describe, if there was such a thing as a industrial size washing machine with a super hyper agitate mode, imagine being thrown inside that, now multiply by ten. After my body stopped being contorted I started to swim up. I swam and swam and swam. It seemed like a bad dream where you struggle and struggle and donít go anywhere. I was swimming under water in foam and not sure I was even swimming in the right direction. I straightened up (mentally that is), got my bearings and slowly swam up. OK, I survived. I donít like where I am, everything is breaking everywhere. I hop on the board and paddle like hell straight to shore. The rip is keeping me out and Iím getting killed by wave after wave after wave. At one point I had the tether line wrapped around both legs while under water, wow! I was glad to get back in. This was all taking place right in front of Heidi sitting on a lawn chair. Being a strong swimmer she said she was seconds from diving out there to save me, Iím glad I didnít need it. ..... Pic below is another day, small waves.



Heidi is a smart girl and decides to practice the basics in the pool first. The guy giving me pointers said surfing is 90 some percent upper body. You need to balance on the surfboard on the bottom of your rib cage and do a crawl motion paddle while keeping your feet on top the surfboard.



Heidi practices the move you do when a monster wave is about nail you.



TBC:
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Unread 12-14-2005, 06:28 PM   #15
cavebiker
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Location: Hayward, Wi
Posts: 126
Cabo: & Secret Beach:

Cabo:
Heidi & I needed to go back to Cabo to return a wetsuit. What a bummer, we gotta go back to Cabo. This time we thought we would park near downtown and hang out for awhile. We found tons of shops selling tons of stuff, same tons of stuff! One restaurant had a mime out front harassing people, a Seinfeld episode comes to mind, we donít want to go past him twice. We sat at an open air restaurant, Las Quesadilasss on a busy corner. Thereís loud Mexican tourist music playing and weíre attacked by four waiters before we finished looking at the menu; we looked at each other and boogied. On the way back to the jeep we check out a few more shops. In a one block stretch I was hit on to buy ďdopeĒ, ďwhite stuffĒ and ďcocaineĒ, three different people. Then in a shop a guy tried to sell me a crack pipe. OK, this is all fun, not really. Not the kind of place where I would order a drink and leave it unguarded. See Ya Cabo!


Secret Beach:
We head out again to look for the secret beach that nobody seems to know about, itís said to be between Todos Santos and the main surf beach to the south. We think we found it this time, driving down the road we see why not many go here.



The last part of the road is driving across a small creek with big bumps after which you can park. The beach is about a 500 meter walk through an oasis type jungle.



Secret beach.



TBC:
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