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Unread 10-26-2013, 11:47 AM   #16
squire_wj
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In the shop its mig 1/16 wire flux core with 100% CO2 for shielding gas. I like mine, the only thing if I don't wear a beany I find the helmet pulls my hair. Other then that I like it, in the summer its nice it blows cool air on to my head so that's a plus when its 39 out side and I am in my leathers

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Unread 10-26-2013, 12:36 PM   #17
Ironworker709
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Quote:
Originally Posted by outbackmatt View Post
That's what I'm thinking about getting. I was quoted $1400 for the speedglass with adflo at my local welding supply company. When I asked about buying a PAPR welding helmet they looked at me like I was crazy. They sell very few and are just too expensive too keep in stock. We have a lot of manufacturing in the area so I was suprised to hear very few people buy respirator helmets. They did tell me a manufacturer of dozer parts bought 50 Speedglas adflo helmets recently from them.

I'm stuck between the speedglass with adflo, miller 9400i papr or a jackson. Sure would like to be able to try the helmets on, see how they fit and feel the quality in person before dishing out $1400.
The reason you don't see them much is because if a company requires the use of them,then they have to foot the bill to buy them all...

You will generaly see them in places like catepillar..john deere...heavy equipment manufacturers for the fact of all the exotic and stainless steel materils used..also along with big vessel manufacturers and such...just among a few.

I have had to use the Adflo's a few times in a nuclear plant when i had to go down into a reactor cavity to do some tig welding..they really are more comfortable then they look and keep your head nice and cool all day..

If you want to save a good chunk and don't mind used..alot of guys buy them for a job and switch careers or jobs and don't need them anymore..i see them on eBay quite often at 1/2 the new prices...

This one might be a good one..since the person mis-spelled "adlfo" instead of adflo,it probably won't get many views from people searching for one,i have scored some pretty sweet deals purposely mis spelling a search at times..lol..and it looks to be in real nice shape...
http://www.ebay.com/itm/3M-Speedglas...8b#ht_70wt_993

There is a bunch of used ones for sale in the search for them on eBay
http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_odkw...adflo&_sacat=0
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Unread 10-26-2013, 02:23 PM   #18
outbackmatt
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Ironworker, figured I could ask you about this, my shop is approximately 22' x 75' with 9' walls and I have my welding table near the middle. There is no ventilation except for garage doors on each end that provide cross ventilation during the summer, infact so much the wind blows the welding gas and I have to usually keep one door halfway down. The shop is uninsulated and not air tight what so ever.

The winter is my concern for ventilation. I have a large propane heater and it is impossible to have the temps within reason when I do have the garage doors open. Therefore when temps fall into the 30's and the wind is blowing through the shop I have to shut the doors. How dangerous are the welding fumes with the doors down if I am mig welding mild steel for short periods, about 30 minutes at a time? never galvanized or stainless. I dont let smoke build up in the shop, if I am doing a lot of welding I will open at least one door no matter the temp outside.

On welding ventilation in general, how do I determine adequate ventilation? I read everything I found from OSHA about proper ventilation for mig welding mild steel. They state you need 10,000 cubic ft per welder for natural ventilation and walls at least 16' high. My shop meets the cubic ft as I am the only welder, but not the height requirements.

I want to put at least a 14,000 cfm exhaust fan up in the gable of my shop. If my math is correct this would do a complete air change over in 1 1/2 minutes. Would this be enough to remove fumes?

Also I am thinking about rearranging my shop so that I have an 18 x 21 welding room, walled off from the rest of the shop. This welding room would contain the 14,000 cfm exhaust fan and my welding table would be positioned so that I stand upwind from the fumes. This way I can keep the rest of the shop heated during the winter where I spend 85% of my time on the chop saw, bending, notching and drilling. I dont mind if the welding room is cold. Plus in the summer I can open up a door from the welding room to the rest of the shop which would allow the large exhaust fan to draw air through the entire shop from the garage door at the other end for cooling.

What do you think about this idea? Some might call me paranoid, thats fine I care about being healthy. For the past 7 years I've been reckless with welding fumes. I breathed in all the fumes and dust and just put up with the nightly congestion and black boogers. Fabrication has become very busy and its time I do something about the safety.
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Unread 10-26-2013, 05:56 PM   #19
Ironworker709
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You are FAR from being paranoid..take it from someone who is now dealing with alot of issues from welding since the 70's and went through the time when everything in safety was limited and weak...

#1...my eyes are gettin bad..they won't focus right and starting to have blurry vision at far distances...eye doc said its common for us older weldors when the safety glasses and weld lens were minimal protection..

#2...i've had heart problems linked directly to welding fumes..3 stents so far......i'm on the list to be watched closely for the parkinsons disease to catch it early if it happens...


But on another note..i think OSHA gets a little overbourd with some things..

What you have in mind should more than efficeint..

As far as pretty simple and cheap option..a good exhaust fan about midway in the wall for flux coated welding..if you'll walk into a shop that welds all day,you'll notice the low lying "cloud" from the fumes..not up in the ceiling much like most think happens...
Just get one maybe that is a 3 speed type and test each speed out when heating the shop to a speed just enough to remove fumes but not completly remove the heat...

Another cheap option for the sheilding gas when TIG or MIG welding would be build a short portable wall with 2 cheap box fans in it to put under the garage door and turn the fans on while welding with MIG and TIG...sheilding/inert gases are heavier than air and tend to stay low to the ground...just create enough exhaust to remove the gasses..being a one man operation you won't be producing much of it.

You can also build a small exhaust fan for the fumes with a flexible duct type hose to hang directly over your welding for both flux and non flux welding..it'll suck out fumes and gasses but not create enough wind to hurt the shielding gasses
__________________
Don't DREAM your life, LIVE your dreams

Never forget 9/11

"Welding is like a woman,Get 'er HOT and Penetrate"

Gotta LOVE a person who knows everything about NOTHING

The only Thing necessary for the Evil to win is a good man to do nothing....

"How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young,compassionate with the aged,sympathetic with the striving,and tolerant with the weak and strong--because someday YOU will have been all of these"....George Washington Carver

Want to know what an Ironworker is and the job scope of a Journeyman?..click here...http://www.ironworkers.org/becoming/careers.aspx
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Unread 10-27-2013, 01:48 AM   #20
WSS
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Google "brass shakes". It is a manganese induced disease from early shipyards. Not fun. We run both fume extractors and supplied air and lately a unit called "cool band" from Miller.

The fume extracor is a large smoke extractor from Grainger, it is plumbed throughout the shop and each table has two that are adjustable on hinged arms to place on either side of the nozzle. The supplied air is plumbed in from the lunch room and runs through the fridge. It has a 3/4" intercooler layed in the vegetable crisper and filled with water, the freezer is has 20 blue ice type blocks that we can rotate in and out of the crisper, on the days it is 108 in the shop we can blow 88 over our faces with fresh clean, smoke free air, one drawback is you smell (sometimes taste) whatever the guy on lunch is eating, the other is that you are tethered to a 25' area.

Our shop stocks Jackson "NexGen" filters and lens parts and we use both types of Jackson hoods, but I did give a Miller Elite to my shop foreman and put a Cool Band on it, it does not bring the temp down near as much but it is filtered air, keeps the lens from fogging too. It has a rechargable battery that last about 8hrs. The big plus is you are not tethered to the machine like the supplied air. If you already have the Miller hood, then the cool band is a ready fit deal.

Supplied air (6cfm per line, two line capability):



Cool Band on Miller hood (looks heavy but is balanced nice):

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Unread 10-30-2013, 05:59 PM   #21
outbackmatt
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Thanks for the replies, I have two 5000 cfm exhaust fans on order for the shop and started looking at comfortable respirators to fit under my miller elite helmet. I too run the miller cool band and love how it eliminates the constant fogging lens I was having with all the humidity here in georgia. The cool band is comfortable to wear, although it is not for respiratory protection.

The 3m half mask with the pancake filters I picked up feels great after getting used to it, but it wont let my helmet down all the way so I only use it for cutting and grinding. I'm now trying the miller half mask for welding which is designed for the miller helmets. One thing I did not know in all the years I've been wearing half masks for painting is that you must be absolutely 100% clean shaven, not even a spec of stubble. I must have missed that line in the fine print! Makes me wonder how much paint fumes I've been exposed to. Osha is strict about their no facial hair policy when using respirators but they dont go into details as to the amount it reduces respirator performance. I was wondering as long as there are no fume smells coming through the mask, can I be assured I have been getting a good seal?

This would apply to my welding half mask too and I usually have stubble. Just out of curiosity I did the negative and positive pressure user seal test with my 3m half mask and could not detect any leaks due to facial hair. Now either I dont know how to identify an air leak in a user seal test or osha must be blowing the no facial hair policy out of proportion. I can understand a chewbacca like beard interfering with the seal, but just some stubble around the chin, seriously? I dont mind being clean shaven and will do so from now on, I just would like to know specifically how much would stubble on the chin decrease the effectiveness of a p100 half mask? Are we talking 5%, 10% less? Is it still better than no mask at all?


Does osha require a respirator for welding mild steel?
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Unread 11-24-2013, 10:39 PM   #22
Strings72
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I am a fitter, but in a 10 hour day I weld for about 3 hours. He have some ceiling vents we turn on when things get hazy.
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