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Unread 12-16-2014, 02:59 PM   #1
indeepwithajeep
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New to welding

Picked up a Hobart 210MVP. I wanted something that would last and not need any upgrades later on. Bought it to do some more custom work on the Jeep and other cars. Starting small and soaking up all the information I can. Planning on sticking with flux-core for some time. Had to build an extension cord adapter for running 220v (50' 10/3 SOOW).



Here's my horrible work station. Basically nothing to prop against to steady my hand. Also the table surface is not conductive so I ground directly to the work. The table and chair is about half way up my shin and I'm about 6'1"


My first t-joint I tested.


Getting more fancy and consistent with some techniques.


Starting some simple bump stop extensions. I don't want to dive into anything structural until I'm 100% confident I can produce great results every time with proper fusion.


Thanks for looking Any tips would be appreciated.

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Unread 12-16-2014, 07:31 PM   #2
AtTheHelm
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That's a nice machine, I have one too. Owned it about 16 months and have probably ran about 200lbs of wire through it using it daily. Only issue I had was a a bad contactor that was an easy fix and the part was replaced with ease under warrantee.

If you can swing it, get a 20lb bottle of straight C02... Lasts a long time. I think a welding table of some sort might be your next step though.

Have fun!
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Unread 12-16-2014, 08:51 PM   #3
tcox
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You should build yourself a mobile table. You could even make it where it will hold the welder and tank and all the other tools you will need. This will give you lots of practice with different joints, thicknesses etc.

Plus when you are done you will have a good work station that is higher than your shins
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Unread 12-16-2014, 09:25 PM   #4
underpowered
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welding table is always a great welding project.

i have the same machine and love it.
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Unread 12-17-2014, 10:40 AM   #5
Jim1611
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Welding is a great skill to have and will open allot of doors for you to make many things and save allot of money. The Hobarts are good machines too. You're getting off to a good start. I'm going to critique you a bit on that second bead. It's not that good. Let me explain and I also realize you're new to this. That's why the advice. What you're getting there is what so many refer to as the stacked dimes and they can really be made to look great but as far as strength goes they fall short. Welds need to be smooth as possible. That makes for less stress in the weld. Consistent heat and technique are what's required. My favorite place to get an example of what welds should be like are what is used on heavy earth moving equipment and farm machinery. Go take a look sometime and you'll see very smooth welds. Copy them the best you can. There's allot to learn but once you get headed in the right direction it's easy. Being able to hear the weld is also important. With mig it sounds like eggs frying. Keep the splatter to a minimum too as this sometimes can indicate the wrong settings. It can also mean the metal is dirty. Clean surfaces are a must for good welds. Bare metal is usually best so keep the grinder handy.


A bench is not a luxury it's a requirement. You're already finding that out. I've been using mine all day for building stairs and without it the job would be a struggle. A nice flat surface works great when you're going to tack something together. Tack it all up then try to keep the heat away from the table top when you finish the welds, this keeps the top from warping. Here's my bench. Also there's a great video for mig welding I'll attach. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4RrDeUKcH4

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Unread 12-17-2014, 01:43 PM   #6
indeepwithajeep
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Correct me if I'm wrong. Although I've noticed when doing a T joint (keeping a 45 degree gun angle as recommended). It seemed I was going under/through the joint corner and not getting adequate fusion on each part of the joint (.30 wire on about 4g). So I was using the C gun technique so I can keep the heat on each side longer. I do see how it'll cause the weld to have a weaker part, as it didn't get as much fusion. Just curious what to do in that case. I'd imagine multiple passes. Although it seems inconsistent fusion on the joint corner when I fill with the initial center pass. If I turn down the amps it doesn't seem to penetrate as well. If I keep the heat on the bottom edge that needs more heat, I feel I don't get an even bond on each joint edge.
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Unread 12-17-2014, 03:50 PM   #7
Jim1611
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Your amps should be set to the thickness, type of material and wire size. You can vary the wire speed to some degree to help with penetration too but not allot. Too much wire speed and the weld looks fat and too little leaves not enough fill material for a good weld. Maybe you're not close enough to the corner with the tip when you do this weld? Usually the fillet weld is one of the easiest to make. Under most conditions you should be able to make one pass on each side of the t-joint and have a great weld. Practice will make those welds get much better. I know that sounds simple but believe me it works. You'll be looking back in a couple of weeks seeing how far you've progressed and see a vast improvement. Experiment some with that wire speed and the speed at which you move the gun. Practice practice practice. You welds after some of that will look and be better.
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Unread 12-17-2014, 09:23 PM   #8
underpowered
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim1611 View Post
Welding is a great skill to have and will open allot of doors for you to make many things and save allot of money. The Hobarts are good machines too. You're getting off to a good start. I'm going to critique you a bit on that second bead. It's not that good. Let me explain and I also realize you're new to this. That's why the advice. What you're getting there is what so many refer to as the stacked dimes and they can really be made to look great but as far as strength goes they fall short. Welds need to be smooth as possible. That makes for less stress in the weld. Consistent heat and technique are what's required. My favorite place to get an example of what welds should be like are what is used on heavy earth moving equipment and farm machinery. Go take a look sometime and you'll see very smooth welds. Copy them the best you can. There's allot to learn but once you get headed in the right direction it's easy. Being able to hear the weld is also important. With mig it sounds like eggs frying. Keep the splatter to a minimum too as this sometimes can indicate the wrong settings. It can also mean the metal is dirty. Clean surfaces are a must for good welds. Bare metal is usually best so keep the grinder handy.


A bench is not a luxury it's a requirement. You're already finding that out. I've been using mine all day for building stairs and without it the job would be a struggle. A nice flat surface works great when you're going to tack something together. Tack it all up then try to keep the heat away from the table top when you finish the welds, this keeps the top from warping. Here's my bench. Also there's a great video for mig welding I'll attach. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w4RrDeUKcH4

To add to this, movement with the gun should be kept to a minimum when welding with Flux core as it can trap the shielding flux in the weld. when welding with Gas and solid wire you can weave more freely as the gas is shielding the weld and not flux material. the smooth weld is even more important with flux welding.

cut, weld, grind Repeat. practice, practice, and more practice is what it takes. I am no professional, but am 100% self taught and now do the majority of welding where i work at even over those school trained to weld. any chance you get, stick metal together, mess with your settings to find what works. The factory chart will get you close, but you need to tune to how you weld and what you weld and what works best for you. There is no such thing as scrap, just practice material.
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Unread 12-18-2014, 01:18 PM   #9
indeepwithajeep
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Thanks for taking the time to reply guys
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Unread 12-18-2014, 06:30 PM   #10
Jim1611
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You're very welcome! I was just welding and had a thought that made me want to mention this on your thread. This is such a simple thing but when I finally got it through my thick head my welds got much better. You have to see what the weld puddle looks like. I know that's simple but for me I overlooked it way too often. One reason was my helmet. It was too hard to see out of. I bought a Miller auto dim one and boy did that help. I also have very good lighting in my shop and that's another big help. Likely you have already figured this out before I mentioned it but if not well I'm glad I did.
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Unread 12-18-2014, 09:19 PM   #11
zarnold
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Here are a couple of tables. I can only recommend the miller. Great table but the most expensive by far.

http://www.harborfreight.com/adjusta...ble-61369.html
http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...4325_200434325
http://store.cyberweld.com/miar30weta30.html
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Unread 12-20-2014, 09:13 PM   #12
underpowered
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i suggest building your own table. it helps you hone your welding skills while making something usefull and you can build it to your specs. all tables listed above are great for small projects, but when you get to be building larger stuff (bumpers, sliders, other large parts) a much larger table is needed. I built a 4' x 4' table and it is not big enough at times. but i am used to the larger tables we have at work.
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Unread 12-22-2014, 01:56 AM   #13
indeepwithajeep
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I have a feeling someone is buying me the harbor freight welding table for Christmas. I've been thinking about welding up a parcel shelf in my jeep with something to keep some 6x9 boxes from moving around.

The brackets didn't come out too bad.. It was a pain to not burn through such thin metal. Especially since they weren't cut at perfect 90's (only a hack saw at my disposable). Beveled what I could since I'd be grinding them down flat.



(I used silicone to keep standing water from accumulating in the bump stop)
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Unread 12-25-2014, 05:29 PM   #14
140mower
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Sounds like you have an angle grinder at your disposal. If so, invest in some cut off wheels for it and you will never look back and the hacksaw will rarely leave the toolbox again.....
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Unread 12-25-2014, 09:47 PM   #15
rixcj
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When welding with flux core wire, you want to drag the gun. If you switch over to solid wire and shielding gas, you can drag or push the gun. I prefer to push, myself.

The wire feed speed controls the amperage. The other setting controls the voltage.

You'll want to set the voltage for the thickness of the steel that you are welding, then adjust the wire feed speed so that you feel that you can handle it while getting good penetration. THIS ALL TAKES PRACTICE!

Like Jim said...don't strive to perfect that stack of dimes weld. That is bad for a lot of reasons. Maintain a nice consistant travel speed, and maybe a little weave as you move along.

Rich
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