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Unread 08-17-2010, 09:17 AM   #31
jsc7002
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I thought I read something somewhere about using a high-silicone wire for welding cast??

Ill see if I cant find the link or something.

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Unread 08-18-2010, 01:52 PM   #32
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Will flux core with a HH140 work with a Dana 30? Trying to beef up the front axle for a 3 link and I want to prevent the single upper from spinning the tube. Before the truss goes on at least.
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Unread 08-19-2010, 01:16 AM   #33
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It can be done with that machine,but i would definitly do a pre-heat before the weld with any 110v machine,but i've heard great things about the HH 140 and how well it runs for a 110v..and make sure you leave no undercut in the weld.Fluxcore would be my choice for that machine since fluxcore gets a much better penetration
Leaving any cunder cut in a weld makes the base metal substainialy weaker for the fact you now have less material for strength..making that a weakpoint...for example..if you are working with a 3/16" material,and leave just a 1/16" undercut..you now only have the strength of a 1/8" material

As long as you pre-heat for good penetration with that machine..and get a GOOD bead..you should be fine since you're just adding strength to the factory plug welds.

Might be a good idea to make up some kind of JIG to keep the axle tube straight while welding and leave it there for a few hours to cool so it doesn't warp the tube and put stress on the axles.
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Unread 08-19-2010, 07:02 PM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcorn View Post
Will flux core with a HH140 work with a Dana 30? Trying to beef up the front axle for a 3 link and I want to prevent the single upper from spinning the tube. Before the truss goes on at least.
Somebody up there in NOVA or Beltway Jeepers should be able to hit your tubes with a 220v welder to eliminate any doubt. The axle pumpkin is large and will dissipate heat quickly.. making it difficult to get good penetration with even the largest of 110 welders.. IMO.
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Unread 08-22-2010, 07:45 PM   #35
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Originally Posted by BESRK View Post
Somebody up there in NOVA or Beltway Jeepers should be able to hit your tubes with a 220v welder to eliminate any doubt. The axle pumpkin is large and will dissipate heat quickly.. making it difficult to get good penetration with even the largest of 110 welders.. IMO.
That's why i said a pre-heat,but meant to get across i would if at all possible do it with a 220v machine.

This has been covered so many times on here over and over..bottom line is always to use the best possible means..220v wire or stick ..and i would still use a pre-heat and post heat for the fact of the large section/chunk of steel the pumpkin is..or..use a hi nickel rod/wire and still a pre-heat and post heat.

This is all as a best case scenerio..i do understand some don't have access,but i perosnaly wouldn't want to trust all that money wrapped up into an axle with a 110v machine
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Unread 08-23-2010, 06:31 AM   #36
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Just wondering. I wouldn't trust myself yet to do any welding on the axle because I'm not very experienced with the welder. I have a few friends with 220V machines that can help me install the axle brackets and weld up the tubes if necessary. Thanks for the info guys.
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Unread 09-04-2010, 02:20 AM   #37
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Originally Posted by Pacfanweb View Post
Question to all about this particular one, and I'm in no way being critical, just asking: Is this really a good, strong weld, particularly for a housing? It's certainly nice-looking.

But according to your description and how it looks, it appears to be basically a bunch of individual welds. From everything I've read about doing this, I thought it was better to have a continuous weld, not keep starting and stopping like you do with sheet metal. Am I seeing this correctly?
this is not the correct way to weld anything . just a bunch of tacks no matter how you slice it. and it looks cold by the way. this tack method is nice for backyard welders who cant make a decent bead the right way. not picking on the poster just stating a fact a guy who welds for a living isnt gonna lay a bead down like that
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Unread 09-08-2010, 02:08 PM   #38
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Originally Posted by jeepfreek383 View Post
this is not the correct way to weld anything . just a bunch of tacks no matter how you slice it. and it looks cold by the way. this tack method is nice for backyard welders who cant make a decent bead the right way. not picking on the poster just stating a fact a guy who welds for a living isnt gonna lay a bead down like that
I have more experience in making welds that look like that work. Even when working as a continuos bead on a mig (flux or solid core) half the time, you are heating the filler up to lay on top of the already layed material as you go. Basically with the tack option, you are putting the most heat to that exact point as you go, and not just laying more material on top of rod. With the tacking option also, you are fusing the materials together, not just laying material on top of it.

With heavy equipment I have the most experience welding as far as excavators/loaders and attachments such as bosses on buckets and rakes. Most of the factory welds would break after enough abuse. Usually they break along the weld line and sometimes it would creep through 1/2 to 3/4" steel. Instead of going along the lines of the weld where the two materials will meet, I would lay a tack bead along there, then go the opposite way. Criss crossing them 2 layers with the tack option. After I learned that, no welds of mine ever broke. A tool I made out of forklift forks withstood a 50 ton jack with no cracks with "tack" welding. 1 and 1/2 steel 90 deg welded together in a u-shape was the base of the jack. It bent the 90's of the 1 1/2 and the base, but did not crack.

Also whenever welding, flat is preferred, but if you have to go vertical, that tacking option works best for me. That way there is no puddle falling at all. That is all, IMO, carry on.
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Unread 09-08-2010, 03:04 PM   #39
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I have more experience in making welds that look like that work. Even when working as a continuos bead on a mig (flux or solid core) half the time, you are heating the filler up to lay on top of the already layed material as you go.(This makes no sense to a weldor at all,burning in one consistant pass gives continuos heat and penetration in the area,tacking and move method does NOT,it lets the area cool and heat,which actualy creates stress within the weldmant and gets very little penetration) Basically with the tack option, you are putting the most heat to that exact point as you go...(burning one consistant pass with no stop n go will get you MORE penetration,not an opinion,a FACT), and not just laying more material on top of rod. With the tacking option also, you are fusing the materials together, not just laying material on top of it.
none of this makes any sense to me and other true weldors

With heavy equipment I have the most experience welding as far as excavators/loaders and attachments such as bosses on buckets and rakes. Most of the factory welds would break after enough abuse. Usually they break along the weld line and sometimes it would creep through 1/2 to 3/4" steel. Instead of going along the lines of the weld where the two materials will meet, I would lay a tack bead along there, then go the opposite way. Criss crossing them 2 layers with the tack option. After I learned that, no welds of mine ever broke. A tool I made out of forklift forks withstood a 50 ton jack with no cracks with "tack" welding. 1 and 1/2 steel 90 deg welded together in a u-shape was the base of the jack. It bent the 90's of the 1 1/2 and the base, but did not crack.

Also whenever welding, flat is preferred, but if you have to go vertical, that tacking option works best for me. That way there is no puddle falling at all. That is all, IMO, carry on.
If you have problems welding a vertical without using a "tack n go" method,then you need more practice welding to be a weldor...

I agree totaly with jeepfreak383,that tacking method is a weaker weld,it makes for a weaker weld for the fact you are not generating enough penetration through the whole weld,this also puts stress within the weldmant itself.

If you are having problems on welds holding up on heavy equipment as you say, then you are either using the wrong filler metal and/or not using the right pre-heat and post heat method needed for that type of wear plate or hardened steel.
If that was the case,then all those welds made during the building of the heavy equipment would all have that"tack n go method" from the factory,which they do NOT..for a GOOD reason...

The Pre-heat and post heat releives the stress created by the weld on exotic metals,DH-2..T1..etc..i can't think of the long list of hardened steel used on heavy equipment at the moment,there is a long list of the different types used,but they all have to be treated different when welding,you can't just grab any filler metal/rod and "git'rdun" without failure unless you go by the right procedures and materials they are designed for...Carry on
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Unread 09-08-2010, 11:00 PM   #40
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I did no edits and stand behind everything I said. If you are using a stick welder, dont tack and go. If gasless mig, it has worked better for me on 3/4" and thicker steel. 5/8" and below, our miller 251 could handle. Pre and post heat accordingly.

Last edited by 1ironwill; 09-08-2010 at 11:09 PM.. Reason: not gonna have a "whats better" comp
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Unread 09-08-2010, 11:43 PM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1ironwill View Post
I have more experience in making welds that look like that work. Even when working as a continuos bead on a mig (flux or solid core) half the time, you are heating the filler up to lay on top of the already layed material as you go. Basically with the tack option, you are putting the most heat to that exact point as you go, and not just laying more material on top of rod. With the tacking option also, you are fusing the materials together, not just laying material on top of it.

With heavy equipment I have the most experience welding as far as excavators/loaders and attachments such as bosses on buckets and rakes. Most of the factory welds would break after enough abuse. Usually they break along the weld line and sometimes it would creep through 1/2 to 3/4" steel. Instead of going along the lines of the weld where the two materials will meet, I would lay a tack bead along there, then go the opposite way. Criss crossing them 2 layers with the tack option. After I learned that, no welds of mine ever broke. A tool I made out of forklift forks withstood a 50 ton jack with no cracks with "tack" welding. 1 and 1/2 steel 90 deg welded together in a u-shape was the base of the jack. It bent the 90's of the 1 1/2 and the base, but did not crack.

Also whenever welding, flat is preferred, but if you have to go vertical, that tacking option works best for me. That way there is no puddle falling at all. That is all, IMO, carry on.
i dont really understand. on heavy equipment you are either stick welding or using a dual shield flux core both of which are available with all position rods or wire which helps keep the puddle from drooping and allow greater penetration over standard mig, so there should be no reason to tack weld anything other than at fitup. maybe this explains why heavy equipment is constantly being rewelded (lack of fusion,slag inclusions =weak welds) but anyway for 8.8 tubes yeah it might work but it is def. not the correct way. im done
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Unread 09-09-2010, 07:45 AM   #42
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I've done a lot of research into this subject of tack-tack-tack welding vs. real MIG welding.
You have lots of people that use the tack method that swear by it "because my stuff has held up".
That's all well and good, however:

I think the final word on the subject is, none of that type of welding will pass any sort of certification or inspection process. It is not recognized as a proper method by any welding authorities.

Plenty of things people do incorrectly and still get by with them. Doesn't make it the "right" way, though.

And to me, it just seems like a lot more work to keep stopping and starting all the time, versus just getting your burn on.
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Unread 09-09-2010, 05:02 PM   #43
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maybe this explains why heavy equipment is constantly being rewelded (lack of fusion,slag inclusions =weak welds)
LOL, I can agree with this.

I worked for a major northeast Cat dealer as a Union welder. Alot of the welds factory were lack or pen or just layed on the steel. Air-arcing was second nature and alot of it was brand new machine's with 1-2 hours on them.

Now I own my own welding business and I'm allways fixing lack of pen welds or cold welds. Boom and stick section sections were the worst, buckets I can expect.
But now were way off topic

Jason.
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Unread 09-23-2012, 09:10 PM   #44
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We fluxcore welded the rear of my fords 8.8. We did not heat up the steel prior, it worked for winter, but come summer and more grip, it sheared the welds loose, unlocking it again. We welded the cage to the gears, no flux inside the teeth.
Im going to do it again, but with a stick this time.
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Unread 10-01-2012, 09:42 PM   #45
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I'd it's cast steel you could certainly do it with solid wire, flux core or metal core. I wouldn't ever use nickel rod with stick unless its cast iron.
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