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Unread 07-17-2013, 11:09 AM   #1
drewabril
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10'x12' Shed/Workshop

Hi Jeepers-

Im looking at building a 10x12 shed (citys limit without needing a permit) in my yard to house my compressor, tools and a work bench. Running up and down 2 flights of stairs to retrieve tools several times per wrenching session gets exhausting.

Anyway the reason for making this thread is that this will be my first time building something like this. I have experience building decks, and i've built a couple of interior walls in my house, but never a free standing structure. I don't like any of the kits available, either because they are over priced, don't use PT for the floor, or a variety of other reasons. Has anyone on here been down this road? Any tips for a weekend warrior taking on this project?

The shed will be on a hill, I'll keep it level using concrete footings and 3' tall 4x4 timbers in the back and solid concrete blocks on the front side to keep it off the ground.

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Unread 07-17-2013, 11:55 AM   #2
TXST8tj
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I had an 8x10 built. I went that route for the same reasons you mentioned....just didn't like anything anyone makes.

Ours was built on a small slope using concrete block to level it off the ground.
I actually wanted a concrete slab poured for it, but we could not because the easement was so large (14') that it would've put the shed in the middle of that section of yard.

The "hip style" roof was more difficult to build, but it looks nicer than a basic gable style.

We used the original back door from the house. My wife wanted a full glass back door, so it made it easy to do both at the same time. I did not want a DIY plywood door on the shed. They start off nice, but never end that way. They will always sag. I didn't want the headache. Bottom line, I would definitely suggest buying a real exterior prehung door for your shed. An added benefit is that you can lock it using regular house keys.

Picture is before painting it to match the house. We built a flower bed along the front (window side) and door side to dress it up and hide the elevation change and concrete blocks.

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Unread 07-17-2013, 12:37 PM   #3
drewabril
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Great idea on the door, I was thinking of using a door that slides to the side (think minivan) so that if i needed to I could park a lawn tractor or ATV in the shed when i wasn't using it.
Also-That roof is great.. do you think it was cheaper/less material to build vs a gable roof? I don't mind the extra work if mine comes out looking that cool and saves a few bucks.


Thanks for sharing
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Unread 07-17-2013, 01:09 PM   #4
TXST8tj
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I like your door idea. I just wanted something that sealed the best it possibly could. The widest thing I had to push in there was the push lawn mower, but a lawn tractor or ATV would definitely require something wider and custom.

I doubt it was any cheaper to build. I would say the materials required were similar to what would be needed for a gable, but it was more work to construct...not hard, just more work.
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Unread 07-17-2013, 06:02 PM   #5
jamesdart
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that's a nice looking shed. hip roof looks cool, but I think I would mmake use of the little bit of space with a regular gable roof. I would go with a double steel door. never know what you will want to put in there. you can get double 6 panel looking steel doors for pretty cheap. put some security hinges on the doors and set them up to swing out. that was my plan, but my wife got tired of me planning and bought a nice 8x15 vinyl shed. I never thought I would call one of them nice, but it is.
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Unread 07-17-2013, 06:33 PM   #6
sherlocktk
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My and my buddy built one, we built it with a 'barn style' roof with plans from this site
http://www.shedking.net/barn-shed-plans.html for like $6. Plans were worth the money. for a 10x12 we were about $2000, with a real door, wind rated shingles and pressure treated floor.

I have never built one before but I have always been good at building "stuff'

If We were to build again, i would DEFINATELY pour a slab. 1.5 yard should be enough. So a 1 yard cement trailer worth of mix + another one, or bag the rest.

We built ours with 9 cement footings buried and leveled 1 inch above grade, attached to 3 4x4's onto a base that is 12 inches on center with 3/4 pressure treated plywood for the 'floor" Very little waste in the design on the site above. I think we upgraded the studs to 16 inches on center to be more like house construction and used 2x6 for the "flats" so it could hold more weight. The shed is bombproof.
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Unread 07-17-2013, 06:41 PM   #7
sherlocktk
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Also If you do NOT have a nailgun and compressor, Go buy the $80 framing nailer from harbor freight and a cheap compressor. its a lifesaver for attaching all the siding and framing. I nailed the roof by hand but I think I would rent the roofing nailer too.
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Unread 07-17-2013, 08:07 PM   #8
Indy
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No pics of the last 8x8 i built, but 12x16, 14 feet tall. Sheds are easy.





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Unread 07-17-2013, 10:34 PM   #9
AtTheHelm
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I'd go with the gambrel style roof/trusses like Indy did. Very efficient with having the extra space up there, maybe your compressor will fit up there. I'd also look into hard wiring it so you have power in there too. Long extension cords and power tools are a pain.
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Unread 07-18-2013, 05:27 AM   #10
drewabril
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I knew i came to the right place for info!

Quote:
Originally Posted by sherlocktk View Post
Also If you do NOT have a nailgun and compressor, Go buy the $80 framing nailer from harbor freight and a cheap compressor. its a lifesaver for attaching all the siding and framing. I nailed the roof by hand but I think I would rent the roofing nailer too.
Thanks for the tips, I added the HF framing gun to my budget, but i honestly didn't know there was a difference between a framing gun and a roofing one. I'll look in to this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Indy View Post
No pics of the last 8x8 i built, but 12x16, 14 feet tall. Sheds are easy.
That shed is awesome..great work
14' might be too tall/heavy for where i plan on building, but if i can make it work i'd love to have all that loft space. Thanks for the idea

Quote:
Originally Posted by AtTheHelm View Post
I'd go with the gambrel style roof/trusses like Indy did. Very efficient with having the extra space up there, maybe your compressor will fit up there. I'd also look into hard wiring it so you have power in there too. Long extension cords and power tools are a pain.
I'd like to run a 20amp circuit to it. I have some ideas for how i want this to work but i need to verify that it is up to code, i will handle that after the shed is framed.

I also want to run Cat6. Can I run that in the same conduit as romex? As long as its shielded i should be OK right?
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Unread 07-18-2013, 07:28 PM   #11
thantos858
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Quote:
Thanks for the tips, I added the HF framing gun to my budget, but i honestly didn't know there was a difference between a framing gun and a roofing one. I'll look in to this.
Framing nails are longer and generally larger diamiter. Most framing guns have the nails at a angle while roofing guns are a drum.

Quote:
I'd like to run a 20amp circuit to it. I have some ideas for how i want this to work but i need to verify that it is up to code, i will handle that after the shed is framed.

I also want to run Cat6. Can I run that in the same conduit as romex? As long as its shielded i should be OK right?
Romex isn't made for running in wet conditions which is what conduit is outside of your home. Get some THHN/TFFN rated for wet conditions or a direct bury cable.

Cat6 along with any other data/communication cable should be kept away from power because of the noise produced by the current and possible power arcing. You can run a very small conduit or find a direct bury cable for it as well. When placing them keep them separated as far as possible.
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Unread 07-19-2013, 12:01 PM   #12
sherlocktk
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As far as your electrical goes. Dig 18'' trench, put in 2x 3/4 pvc conduits, One for electrical one for your data cable. You glue it all togeher similar to sprinkler pipe. As far as electrical goes, do what is called a multi wire branch circuit, which in your case would be 4 wires, Black, Red, White, green Black and red all 12ga, (unless your shed is really far from your house) . Put this on a dual breaker on both phases of electricity, white and neutral go to there respective locations in the panel. this gives you 2 circuits without the need for a disconnect box to be code compliant. I have run data right next to power without issue. i doubt it will be that long of a run. By running your data cable in conduit, when cat 7 comes out you can just pull the old one out and put in a new one.
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Unread 07-19-2013, 01:27 PM   #13
drewabril
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sherlocktk View Post
As far as your electrical goes. Dig 18'' trench, put in 2x 3/4 pvc conduits, One for electrical one for your data cable. You glue it all togeher similar to sprinkler pipe. As far as electrical goes, do what is called a multi wire branch circuit, which in your case would be 4 wires, Black, Red, White, green Black and red all 12ga, (unless your shed is really far from your house) . Put this on a dual breaker on both phases of electricity, white and neutral go to there respective locations in the panel. this gives you 2 circuits without the need for a disconnect box to be code compliant. I have run data right next to power without issue. i doubt it will be that long of a run. By running your data cable in conduit, when cat 7 comes out you can just pull the old one out and put in a new one.

Thanks for the input on the electrical, out of curiosity what benefit do I gain from that setup over a standard 3 wire setup? I will not run 240 out there, only 120.

Thinking about it now, perhaps a 20amp breaker is too large for my application.

*edit- I did some reading and discovered benefits of the multiwire brach such as less voltage drop and a considerably higher usable current. I still have some decisions to make here, but i think i will wait until the shed is standing and then I can decide how I want it laid out inside and what types of projects I really plan on tackling in/around it.

I'm going to purchase the lumber & concrete for the deck/footings this weekend, then i'm going on a business trip next week. When I get home, i will have a couple hundred dollars of lumber sitting around motivating me to start building. Thanks again for all the input.
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Unread 07-19-2013, 11:43 PM   #14
sherlocktk
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The real reason for the multi wire branch circuit(mwbc) as by code it's only one circuit. If you we're to put two normal circuits in there that would violate code without the proper disconnects. The mwbc let's you have One circuit for lights and another for tools with no real risk of popping a breaker. So by adding one wire and a slightly more expensive breaker you get 2x the electricity for very little extra installation effort and cost. Of course you can do 14ga wire for 15 amps. But there is no real cost or installation difference between the two.
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Unread 07-27-2013, 03:57 PM   #15
MartyA
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Even with a 20 amp circuit I'd guess that lights plus power tool(s) plus compressor kicking on is going to pop a breaker. I've never heard of the multiwire drop but it sounds like a great idea. You learn something every day...

Also, if you can't do a slab or permanent footings you could consider building on a prepared surface. Dig holes as deep as a footing and fill with tamped gravel/rock. Basically you want it to drain so you don't get frost heave. Then spread landscape fabric and more gravel over the full area, then build on blocks/pads. You need to tie the structure down to augured in anchors (like used for mobile homes) or something you bury when you dig the footings.

I'm not saying this is the best option but it can work if you can't place permanent footings. FYI, you should confirm that with the easement - can you put in permanent footings in your easement?

Anyway, good luck! Sounds like you've gotten some great advice, and I'd say Indy's shed looks GREAT.
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