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h2ogun 08-16-2012 07:52 AM

Red River New Mexico
 
Trail Report: Jeep trails around Red River New Mexico. July 2012.

None of the trails we went on got above the timber line, Goose lake was right at the line. Almost all the trails were in deep forest and heavily wooded. The trail beds were mostly dirt that would become mud during or after a heavy rain. In other spots the flowing creek would become the road, shallow and easily passable. The other thing that was common with all the trails is that serene high mountain very green meadows would occur often.

Before going, did some research and came up with Pioneer Creek Trail, Goose Lake Trail, Fourth of July trail and Red River Pass. Later we found the Midnight Meadows and Greene Peak which have common access. A few years ago and another jeep, I had been up to Cabresto lake. Work is currently underway to enlarge the lake by sizable portion and who knows what will be in the when the work is done.

Below is a youtube video of the photos that we had taken. About 5 min long

Pioneer Creek Trail,
starting to the west of the Red River Ski lift is the common wooded and flowing creek bed/ trail through the heavy woods. The trail is cut short where it passes through private land and a locked gate. Maps indicate much more National Forest land and trails beyond the short part that goes through the private land, would be nice to have access across that private land. It is a return trip to get back.

Goose Lake trail
is on the south side of the Red River community (as is Pioneer Creek Trail) and starts on the east end of town. The first obstacle is a long but easy crossing of the Red River. Soon after, it starts to climb quickly with some blind narrow corners. Much of the trail is dirt but was dry. Wet, it would be a messy ride. Frequent on the trail are ruins of miners cabins, one which is directly on the trail with the mine shaft adjacent and the trail cuts across the mine’s tailings. The trail cuts through numerous stands and aspen, and with a quick eye you can catch a snow shoe rabbet. The trail ends at the lake, just at the timberline and a large parking area. Also a return trip.

Red River Pass trail
is on the east end of the community and on the left (northeast) side of the road. I assume it to be the original access to Red River from the east. Now the paved highway from Eagles Nest passes to the north through Bobcat pass. Red River Pass is a set of quick climbing wide switchbacks that reach the summit where private land starts and again no access. The trail bed is less dirt that the other trails and we had a heavy rain/hail storm, and the road while rough, stayed passable. Access to the pass does not continue and is fenced.

There the mystery begins.
It was not present on the forest maps, but the Topo showed a trail leading off to the right (southerly) from the summit of Red River Pass. Fun stuff, a very very narrow path, many narrow blind corners and often muddy portions. We continued on it for many miles where we came to a junction. I was guessing that it was the top of Fourth of July trail. Later when we ran the 4th trail, confirmed it to be true. The narrow trail continued on through heavy deep forest, frequent fallen trees across the trail (but nothing we could not get over or under). We had an occasional muddy tipie tipie where we were concerned about slipping of and down into the steep gulch (and then be eaten by a troll).

It finally ended at a locked gate. Return trip to exit. Along the way, we would notice signs of very old excavation thinking the trail to be part of or parallel to a narrow gauge rail road bed, very narrow. We also passed along side a beautiful high mountain green meadow.

Later research indicated that it was some type of canal that must have water powered something decades ago near the Red River pass. Not for sure what it was. A fun exploration of the area.

Midnight Meadows and Greene Peak
We next set out for Cabresto creek (actually Lake Fork Creek) and lake, but it is closed with the new construction. So we followed the all weather road along the Cabresto Creek to the summit of that creek. Many high mountain meadows and a connection to Midnight Meadows and Greene Peak. There are many small trails that link to mostly mining and some cattle operations.

The Midnight Meadows and Greene Peak trail is a combination of newly constructed and old trails. We were on it later in the day and there was much traffic. A lot of “big eyed white knuckled” drivers. At times narrow and some very very steep climbs.


For reference, the Midnight / Greene Peak trail start out in Mallette Canyon which starts at a city park on the north side of Red River. There is a lot of traffic on these trails. We approached this backwards from Cabresto Creek with different intentions so done from Red River, you could return via Cabresto Creek with numerous ways to get back.

Fourth of July Trail. (Canyon)
This trail is to the east then curving south of Red River on Road 578. It is a little hard to find and is on the right side going away from town . At about 1 mile, it is very short and very very steep, it runs almost straight up the canyon. With the high grade and the need to move swiftly, it is done very fast . We had numerous “catching air” occurrences as we made our way up crossing back and forth across the small canyon. Again mostly dirt trail, with the steep grade, this may be impassable in very wet conditions. As noted, it intersected (no signage) the “Mystery “ trail that lead us back to the summit of Red River Pass.

There are numerous places to dine in Red River, but our favorite was "Yesterdays Diner", with great food and great service.

Link to the Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oC3OF...ature=youtu.be

like2lean 08-16-2012 02:18 PM

Great write up, thanks. And timely as we'll be up there next week and I've been looking for some information on some trails. Overall it doesn't sound like near the network available in Colorado, just some shorter ones that run into private land? What were your favorites? I'd bet there are some nice ones in the Los Alomos area too.

h2ogun 08-16-2012 03:31 PM

It is less than you will find in Colorado, not as much volume but two distinct types of trail. I saw your post about Black Bear, I have been there numerous times and will go back and address some things in that thread (I just return from Ouray area 10 days ago, video not ready yet)

Thanks for the complement on the Red River write up. I wanted to be complete, and yet there is much more in the surrounding area (Taos, Castillo, dang-it another trip:rolleyes:).

As to favorite, IMO, the mystery trail was a treat, but there is some very nice jeepin and sights on the other trails too, its all good.

Cant say much about Los Alomos area. I bough an engine from a fellow (also a jeeper) that lives there and he mentioned that not too much was there, he like jeepin the area north of Alamosa, Colorado.

KaiserM715 09-02-2012 06:11 PM

Nice video.

Quote:

Originally Posted by h2ogun (Post 14028696)
Red River Pass trail
is on the east end of the community and on the left (northeast) side of the road. I assume it to be the original access to Red River from the east. Now the paved highway from Eagles Nest passes to the north through Bobcat pass. Red River Pass is a set of quick climbing wide switchbacks that reach the summit where private land starts and again no access. The trail bed is less dirt that the other trails and we had a heavy rain/hail storm, and the road while rough, stayed passable. Access to the pass does not continue and is fenced.

I completed this trail a couple of weeks ago (8/22). I was able to get through back to NM 38 at Bobcat pass. I do not recall encountering a gate. Here is the GPS track of the route I took:
http://www.everytrail.com/view_trip.php?trip_id=1744311

I also have a trip report in a non-Jeep forum, for those interested:
http://www.fordraptorforum.com/f112/...pass-nm-16284/

Quote:

Originally Posted by h2ogun (Post 14028696)
Pioneer Creek Trail,
starting to the west of the Red River Ski lift is the common wooded and flowing creek bed/ trail through the heavy woods. The trail is cut short where it passes through private land and a locked gate. Maps indicate much more National Forest land and trails beyond the short part that goes through the private land, would be nice to have access across that private land. It is a return trip to get back.

I saw this post after I did the pass, while in Red River. I was wanting to try this one, but the gate is marked locked on a locally available trail map and your post backs that up. I am not sure what allows folks can lock up government land and prevent access by others.

h2ogun 09-04-2012 06:59 AM

Kaiser

That is a pretty neat maping link that you have.

On both Pioneer creek and Red River Pass, there is a lot of private land. If you look at the Carson Natl Forest map, the private land is marked (different shade, green for forest and white for private land). What I dont like is that the private land on Pioneer creek trail is a small area that crosses the trail with a lot of trail left in national forest after crossing the private land, but the gate where the private portion starts limits everything after that.

There is a lot of private land in Colorado with all the mining clames, but the trails are not blocked because of that. To bad that is not to be the case around Red River.

After reading your post that you did not recall any gates, etc, I went back to take a closer look at the top of Red River Pass and looking back at the Carson Forest Map and the USGS topo maps. Your map presentation shows a hard turn to the left at the summit of the pass and your path took you along the crest of the mountain to Bobcat pass. At the summit, (your hard left) is a pipe fence that crosses the orgional Red River Pass road. Every thing to the east of that is private land.

Here is a photo looking east at the summit of Red River Pass (36.680231N,-105.370445W):
http://i433.photobucket.com/albums/q...MG_3670k-3.jpg

The original pass road continued east down Moreno Creek/Canyon. From the photo, you can see the gap in the forest where the road continued but is now closed to public traffic.

Your route, you took to the left (north), and followed the ridge. We also took the road to the left and in a couple 100 yards came upon another closed gate, with sign indicating private property and no trespassing.

The Carson National Forest map also designates that area to be private property all the way to Bobcat Pass.

I think that you were lucky that the gate to the north was open and you could make it all the way to the pavement at the summit of Bobcat Pass.

KaiserM715 09-04-2012 09:22 AM

After looking at it again, I see what you are talking about. You are definitely right about the old road from the pass to NM38 being private property and I do recall a gate there.

Some maps (Bing.com being one) show the route I took as following the boundary between National Forest land and private land. Based on what we have both observed, I agree that I was fortunate to not have a locked gate.

Quote:

Originally Posted by h2ogun (Post 14118165)
That is a pretty neat maping link that you have.

It is a nifty site and makes it easy to share GPS tracks. I make a track with my GPS (Garmin GPSMap 60CSx) and then upload it to the site. It overlays the track on the map.

Quote:

Originally Posted by h2ogun (Post 14118165)
After reading your post that you did not recall any gates, etc, I went back to take a closer look at the top of Red River Pass and looking back at the Carson Forest Map and the USGS topo maps. Your map presentation shows a hard turn to the left at the summit of the pass and your path took you along the crest of the mountain to Bobcat pass. At the summit, (your hard left) is a pipe fence that crosses the orgional Red River Pass road. Every thing to the east of that is private land.

[snip]

The Carson National Forest map also designates that area to be private property all the way to Bobcat Pass.

Getting the Carson maps is one thing I had intended to do at the Questa Ranger station, but I never made it over there. Next time, or I will have to order them online.

KaiserM715 09-04-2012 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KaiserM715 (Post 14118576)
Some maps (Bing.com being one) show the route I took as following the boundary between National Forest land and private land. Based on what we have both observed, I agree that I was fortunate to not have a locked gate.

I went back and checked the map that I have. It is put out by Michael Calhoun - Aspen Maps. I have the April 2011 version. It also shows the trail as being along the boundary. It shows it listed as Forest Road 488, the same as the trail up. It is a pretty good map and can be picked up at the grocery store (Der Markt) as well as a couple of other places.

h2ogun 09-05-2012 06:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KaiserM715 (Post 14121651)
I went back and checked the map that I have. It is put out by Michael Calhoun - Aspen Maps. I have the April 2011 version. It also shows the trail as being along the boundary. It shows it listed as Forest Road 488, the same as the trail up. It is a pretty good map and can be picked up at the grocery store (Der Markt) as well as a couple of other places.

You are correct. The Carson Forest Map indicates that it is private property but there is public access via Forest Road No. 488.

I talked with my jeep buddy that was on this trip and he DID recall a sign indicating that it was private property but DID NOT recall a "no trespassing" sign. My bad.

Thanks for pointing it out. This means that you can take (and be legal) the Old Red River Pass road (Forest Road No 488) from town (road 578) all the way to the summit of Red River pass and then on to the summit of Bobcat pass on hwy 38 (where FR 488 and Hwy 38 intersect).


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