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Building a Bumper?Ruffstuff Axle Simple Swap Kit!~Artec JK 1 TON SWAP~

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Unread 02-26-2011, 08:32 PM   #31
billzcat1
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There's a lot of folks who don't understand their 4WD systems so I'm posting it here. Most of this info is also available on www.wjjeeps.com but no one seems to read it, so here it is. More detailed information and information on axles available here: http://www.wjjeeps.com/tcases.htm

Selec-Trac
Primarily found in Laredo, Special Edition, Freedom Edition, and Columbia Edition
Transfer Case: NV242J (I6) or NV242HD (V8)
Transfer Case fluid: ATF+4

Operating Modes
2WD: rear wheel drive only
4 Part Time: locks front and rear axles together, do not use on paved surfaces as it can cause damage to drivetrain components. Off road/snow only!
4 Full time: powers front and rear axles but allows slip between them through use of a center differential. This can be used on any surface or condition
Neutral: allows flat-towing as the transfer case is disengaged from the transmission
4 LO: Locks front and rear axles together just like 4 Part Time, but also adds a 2.72:1 gear reduction, giving you 2.72 times more torque at the wheels but makes your Jeep 2.72 times slower. Not recommended for use above 25mph. Also, not for use on paved surfaces. Off road/snow only!

Editorial Notes: Selec-Trac is the most desired 4wd system for off-road use because of the numerous modes offered by the NV 242 transfer case and the fully-locked 4HI mode. This is desirable for situations where you need lots of wheel speed to keep forward motion, such as snow-wheeling or in deep mud. This transfer case is also quite reliable but occasionally has trouble shifting between modes. Often, a fluid flush helps improve this.

Also, with open differentials front/rear, you have the option of easily installing lockers or limited slip differentials. The Dana 30 and Dana 35 differentials have many options from the aftermarket community, but the Dana 44a only has a few options for lockers.

QuadraTrac-I
Found only on 2004 Laredo I6 models (optional)
Transfer Case: NV147
Transfer Case Fluid: Mopar NV245/247/249 fluid, P/N 05016796AB

Operating Modes
None! The transfer case in this 4WD system is permanently in "4 HI". It uses a gerotor-driven hydraulically operated clutch pack to transfer power from front to rear. It operates just like the more-common NV247 transfer case but does not offer a neutral or low-range selection. This 4WD system will operate as a RWD system until the rear axle slips, at which point the transfer case will send power to the front axle.

Editorial Notes: This 4WD system epitomizes the unfortunate "soccer mom" image that the WJ sometimes carries. Since it offers no low range selection, it is the least desirable 4WD system for off-road use but should still provide good mobility on-road in wet or snowy conditions.

Quadra-Trac II
Found in Laredo and Limited models, standard equipment for V8 models.
Transfer Case: NV247
Transfer Case Fluid: Mopar NV245/247/249 fluid, P/N 05016796AB ONLY

Operating Modes
4 All-Time: Uses a gerotor-driven hydraulically-actuated progressive clutch pack to transfer torque to the front axle. Under normal conditions, the unit operates in RWD but transfers torque to the front axle once wheel spin occurs. Suitable for use on all surfaces/conditions.
Neutral: allows flat-towing as the transfer case is disengaged from the transmission
4 LO: Locks front and rear axles together and disengages the progressive coupler. This also adds a 2.72:1 gear reduction, giving you 2.72 times more torque at the wheels but makes your Jeep 2.72 times slower. Not recommended for use above 25mph. Also, not for use on paved surfaces. Off road/snow only!

Editorial Notes: Quadra-Trac II is a common 4WD system in the WJ and offers "point and shoot" functionality... kind of the "4WD for dummies" system. Not to say it isn't capable, though. With the same 4LO function as Selec-Trac, there are very few situations where Quadra-Trac II will be inadequate.

The NV247 transfer case is generally reliable, but unfortunately does have occasional issues with the progressive coupler used in 4 All-Time. Most service documentation lists ATF+4 as the correct fluid for it, but this is incorrect and Chrysler published a TSB about it. ATF+4 will cause premature wear and binding in the transfer case and will eventually cause destruction of the case. If the coupler fails, then the vehicle will be in RWD mode unless you engage 4 LO.

With open differentials front and rear, the same locker/limited slip options mentioned for Selec-Trac are available.

Quadra-Drive
Special Order for Laredo, Optional for Limited, Standard on Overland
Transfer Case: NV247
Transfer Case Fluid: Mopar NV245/247/249 fluid, P/N 05016796AB ONLY

Operating Modes
4 All-Time: Uses a gerotor-driven hydraulically-actuated progressive clutch pack to transfer torque to the front axle. Under normal conditions, the unit operates in RWD but transfers torque to the front axle once wheel spin occurs. Suitable for use on all surfaces/conditions.
Neutral: allows flat-towing as the transfer case is disengaged from the transmission
4 LO: Locks front and rear axles together and disengages the progressive coupler. This also adds a 2.72:1 gear reduction, giving you 2.72 times more torque at the wheels but makes your Jeep 2.72 times slower. Not recommended for use above 25mph. Also, not for use on paved surfaces. Off road/snow only!

Editorial Notes:Quadra-Drive is the "top-of-the-line" 4WD system offered by Jeep for the WJ. It uses the same transfer case as Quadra-Trac II but added limited slip differentials front and rear called "Vari-Lok". These operate on the same principles as the transfer case, only instead of transferring torque front to rear, they transfer side-to-side. This means you truly have 4 driven wheels with QuadraDrive, something not offered on any of the other 4WD systems. Unfortunately, the same reliability and fluid-compatibility issues from Quadra-Trac II affect Quadra-Drive so transfer case failures are possible.

Off-road, the Vari-Lok differentials give tons of traction and often help the WJ hang with more-built rigs. They function better than most other limited slip differentials because they will lock fully and also operate with one wheel in the air. Unlike the older Trac-Lok differentials offered by Jeep, they operate with virtually no wear and also offer considerably more torque-holding power.

One disadvantage: the VariLok differentials require Mopar friction modifier with their gear oil, making maintenance slightly more expensive. If the wrong amount of friction modifier is added, the differential will either bind or slip too much. Redline's 75W140 gear oil has the proper amount pre-mixed, as does Amsoil's SevereGear. Other oils have *some* friction modifier already added but not enough so you'll have to add a little more until it doesn't bind.

QuadraDrive has one other disadvantage - by adding VariLok differentials, Jeep changed the differential carriers and axle shafts for front and rear differentials. This makes installing any other locker/limited slip impossible without procuring the appropriate parts from a Quadra-Trac 2. If you MUST have a locker, start with a Quadra-Trac II or Selec-Trac vehicle. However, most users of Quadra-Drive are very happy with their operation.

Quadra-Drive II was not available on the WJ. Ever. It was offered on the 2005+ WK Grand Cherokee and is similar to QuadraDrive but added electronic control to the transfer case and differentials...which is either good or bad depending on your point of view. Anyway, when you say your WJ has Quadra-Drive II, you lose all credibility.

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Unread 02-27-2011, 02:44 PM   #32
billzcat1
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The I6 vs V8 Buyers Guide

4.0L I6
The I6 is an older design with a few modern touches added to keep it "fresh". It is a solid chunk of iron....iron block AND iron head. With an all-iron construction, it is not as sensitive to temperature as an aluminum/iron motor and can survive a few overheatings. Its design is similar to the I6s dating back to the AMC days and was shared in many Jeep platforms. It's nearly identical to the motors in the XJ, MJ, TJ, LJ, and ZJ, so many Jeepers prefer this motor because it is something they are already familiar with.

Unfortunately, even the base model WJs are right around 4000lbs curb weight and 190hp/220 ft-lbs is not all that much power/torque. Even in my 3300lb ZJ, the I6 is not fast or quick by any means. Loaded down, climbing the passes means turning off OD and hanging with the semi trucks while the rest of the cars zoom on past. Off road, the low-range gear reduction negates the low power (to some extent) but on-road, the I6 is a bit lacking.

Also, Daimler/Chrysler paired the I6 up with the 42RE transmission and Dana 35 axle....neither of which has a stellar reputation for being durable. By some miracle my 42RE made it to 200k, but that is atypical and I suspect it had been replaced before I got it. Piston cracking is the most common failure of the I6 and it is more common than most I6 fans would like you to believe.

Advantages: Durable - survives neglect. Common - easy to replace. Easy/cheap to work on. Torquey - decent low end torque off-road.
Disadvantages: Noisy - old technology, sounds like a tractor motor. Inefficient - yields a massive 48hp/liter and a best 19mpg. Transmission/Axles: unreliable. Need to regear if you go with larger tires.

4.7L V8
The v8s are something completely new that Chrysler released in 1999. They were on Ward's 10 Best Engines of the Year when they were released. They used a over-head cam design with aluminum heads, a generational leap over the previous v8s which were straight out of the 60s with fuel injection added as an afterthought. The v8 motors tend to produce better fuel economy AND more power than the I6. As for the reliability concerns - there are many well into the 200k zone. The V8s are less forgiving of neglect and do require specific coolant to prevent corrosion of the aluminum components. In addition, if overheated, the head gaskets WILL blow and the heads will probably warp. This is due to the difference in expansion between aluminum and iron and is typical of ANY engine of iron/aluminum design.

Other somewhat uncommon issues: if overheated, the valve seats can drop from the head since they are made from steel and the aluminum head expands far enough for them to drop out. The front cover near the water can become eroded from corrosion, but this is likely caused by using the wrong coolant (HOAT only!). There is a rumor that sludge is an issue, but that is a rumor carried over from the discontinued 5.2L in the Dakota and Grand Cherokee. Sludge is always possible, but with proper maintenance should not be an issue.

The V8s bring an extra 40hp and 70 ft-lbs of torque to the plate without being much heavier than their I6 counterparts. Most of the weight difference isn't in the engine though, and the engine itself may be lighter than the I6. The added weight is elsewhere: transmission and axles.

The V8 got the much-stronger 45RFE (and later, 545RFE) transmission which is still used today in the 390hp Hemi Ram. These rarely ever fail, I think I've seen two failures posted here in the last year. In addition, they added a Dana 44a rear end which is not perfect, but is much stronger than the Dana 35 in the I6 models.

Off road where torque is the king, both motors are fine. On-road is where the v8 shines. How often do you need to do 0-60 off-road? Most of the wheeling I do has an average speed of about 6mph and a top of 22 (per my GPS). But where the I6 will get you to 40mph quickly, the v8 has no problems getting up and going into freeway traffic or climbing the pass fully loaded.

Advantages: Power/Torque, mileage, stronger transmission/axles, towing capacity, won't have as great a need to regear due to higher torque, alternator/power steering pump located up high away from the ground/mud/water.
Disadvantages: not as forgiving of neglect, a little harder/more expensive to work on, not as common if you need to replace it.

4.7 High Output
This is not meant to be the ultimate 4.7HO guide, but more the "should I get one" guide.

The V8 High Output adds a ton of upgraded hard parts to the standard v8, bumps the compression, adds a forged crank, and makes an extra 30hp/30ft-lbs of torque. The nice thing is that it makes the extra torque EVERYWHERE in the power band, not just up high. In addition to the crank, the pistons, bearings, heads, valves, intake manifold, fuel injectors, airbox, air plenum, and spark plugs were also changed.

As for maintenance, the HO is no worse than the standard v8 and only has a few unique maintenance items: spark plugs, air filter, oil. The rest of the different parts are not maintenance items and should never fail in normal usage.
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Unread 02-28-2011, 10:25 AM   #33
GraKee99
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Ryan, here is a quick write up using part of nierace 247 to 242 except it is 247 to 231.

http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f310/...-swap-1174663/
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Unread 03-02-2011, 11:44 PM   #34
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5x5 wheel cross reference chart

http://www.roadkillcustoms.com/hot-r...&StudSpreadMM=
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Unread 03-09-2011, 06:01 PM   #35
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Maybe a list of the companies that make and have WJ parts/upgrades?
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Unread 03-13-2011, 10:47 PM   #36
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The videos in this post should be included

Quote:
Originally Posted by 4Doors View Post
The only fluid that will come out is a bit of seepage from your leak, no gushers. The following videos will give you an idea of what's involved in a rear main seal repair.

Part 1 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ft4LhJWOgtk

Part 2 - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f5o5sZbCEsw
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Unread 03-14-2011, 03:26 PM   #37
lazebum
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This is not mine, I got it from another website and i am using it next weekend. Didnt see one this well done so i thought i would post it.
PART 1 OF 2

Changing axle seals on a D35C rear end (bearings, collars, e-brake shoes, and rear pads also!)

I let this go WAY too long, so as a result I had some additional work to do (namely my e-brake shoes and rear pads were SOAKED in diff oil/grease and had to be replaced)

Before you tear into the project, you'll need the following:
  • D35C Axle Seals
  • D35C Bearings
  • D35C collars
  • E-Brake Shoe Set
  • Rear Pads
  • Differential Oil
  • Bearing grease
Most of the tools you need are standard stuff, except for the slide hammer (rent from Autoparts store) and the press work needed at an Automotive Machineshop. I had access to a press, but didn't have the proper press plates, (nor was the press tall enough for the axles)

I am fortunate enough to have a shop area to work in (I'm also swapping a Lexus V8 into my 4Runner in this space). Getting started:




Getting Started



Jack up the vehicle and properly support with jackstands. Pull off the rear wheels.




Jacked Up on Stands with the Tire Removed



These need a bit of a cleanup...that's not brake dust, it's gear oil...




Grimey Wheel



To make life easier on yourself, unbolt the rear swaybar - there are two bolts on each side of the axle.




Unbolt the Swaybar



Remove the diff cover bolts and pry off the cover to drain the fluid:




Pull the diff cover and drain the fluid



Remove the two bolts holding the caliper on and suspend the caliper from the coil spring (I used a wiretie, but a piece of coat hanger or other wire would work also. The main thing is to keep pressure off the brake hoose (don't hang by the hose):




Remove the 2 caliper mounting bolts



Pop the rotor off of the axle (a light rap with a dead blow mallet will do the trick)




Light tap with a dead blow frees the disc



Yep, pretty greasy under there...no wonder my e-brake wasn't working.




Oil-coated e-brake



Not an issue with solid rotors, but the holes in the Stillens were caked with grease, so a little parts cleaning was in order.




Parts washer is handy for cleaning up the oil soaked parts



Unbolt the axle flange from the rear of the caliper mount (4 nuts):




ABS Sensor



Someone mentioned that the Haynes manual says to remove the ABS sensor at this point - I did not do this, but was just careful around it. Bolt up the slide hammer and have at it. The WJ doesn't use a C-Clip axle, so there is nothing to do in the diff except drain the fluid.




Slide Hammer Attached



Out it comes...




Axle Pulled


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Unread 03-14-2011, 03:28 PM   #38
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OK - you'll notice the e-brake is off already. I staged the last two pics for the sake of the writeup.
Here's a good pic of the reassembled e-brake setup for reference. The spring clips and retainer pins must be removed to pull this assembly. It was pretty easy with the axle removed - gave much more room to work on it.

[/URL]

E-brake Setup

Take your axle over to your drillpress if you have one (hand drill would probably work too). Use a 3/8" bit to drill into the collar. IMPORTANT: be sure not to drill into the axle - you just want to weaken the collar by removing some materal.

[/URL]

Drilling Collar

Take a cold chisel and place a corner of it in the hole you drilled and give it a whack.

[/URL]

Cold Chisel to the Drilled Collar

This will crack the collar and make it slip right off.

[/URL]

Collar Split

[/URL]

Collar can be removed

Repeat this process for the other side and take the axles with the seals, bearings, collars and grease to your favorite automotive machine shop.
Now's a good time to clean up your rear brake sheilds and other stuff that was coated in oil. What a filthy job this was.

[/URL]

Cleaned up brake shield

One thing - make sure you pull the old bearing race out of the axle tube. These are designed to seat in the axle tube when you seat the axle assembly.

[/URL]

Bearing Race

Now that you have your axles back from the machine shop, you are ready to reassemble. I reassembled the e-brake prior to reinserting the axles since I liked the extra room to work with. Here's the axle ready to go back in:

[/URL]

Assembled Axle

Insert the axles back into the tubes and carefully get the splines engaged into the diff. Make sure you keep the axles on the correct sides - they are not the same length. Once you feel the axle seat, give it a couple of tapes with a deadblow mallet. Reinstall the nuts on the axle flange studs.
Time to adjust the e-brake shows. Slip the rotor back on the axle and rotate it listening for the shoes dragging. The piece next to the spring with the wheel on it is rotated to extend/retract the e-brake the shoe position. They make a special tool for this, but I just used a screwdriver and the heel of my hand to bump it. I have enough special tools.

[/URL]

Reassemble E-brake

I had popped the existing rear pads earlier, there is a wire that holds the outer pad in place and the inside pad has a clip that fits into the hole on the shown in the center of the caliper shown below. I used a "C" clamp to spread the caliper a bit to make getting the caliper back over the rotor easier.

[/URL]

Pull old pads from caliper

[/URL]

Install new pads

That clip is a b###h...

[/URL]

The pad clips were tough to get back on

Bolt the calipers back onto the axles.
Clean up the diff cover surfaces, reapply the Mopar diff sealant and bolt the cover back on. FIll 'er up and rebolt the swaybar to the axle.
Put your wheels back on and get it back on 4 wheels. Thought I'd get my spare into the rotation...

[/URL]

All back together

There you have it. Mine got a test of a 1300 mile vacation trip the day after I completed this. No leaks!!
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01 4.0 WJ - Kolak Brake upgrade, Addaco rear sway bar, 3' OME springs, JKS Adj Track Bar, Bilstine Shocks, MOOG Steering Stablizer and TRE's, IRO SYE front kit with a Double Cardan drive shaft, DANA 44a rear swap, booster seat, 7yrold Son, "Don't Tread On Me" Sticker and plates, oh yeah that is how i roll!!
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Unread 03-15-2011, 07:58 PM   #39
straty1987
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the turn signal not working is a common problem, its the flasher relay and it has a hair line crack that keeps it form working.

you can fix it yourself or buy a new one and pop it in, but can only get it form the dealer this is the parthttp://www.justforjeeps.com/flasher.html

its in a tight to get to but you can get it.
first remove the fuse cover on the bottom left, it pops off.
then you have to remove the small plastic that is above the the steering wheel, it pops right off.


then you have to remove the big plastic piece under the steering wheel.



the relays are located above the fuses so get a flashlight, put your head on the floor and look up. the flasher relay is on the top row in the middle,its the one that stick out the most. can wiggle it out and if needed use a pair of needle noise pliers to wiggly it a bit to start it. its the one label combination flasher at the top and the relays at the bottom are what you normally see after you pull that small cover off


now you have it out and you can see 2 push tabs on the sides, use a small flat screwdriver to pop the cover off. now its time to repair the real problem, a hair line crack on one of points against the plastic wall (its a row of 8 or 9 points) just look for crack on one of them, might need a magnifier glass. when you find it you will need to re-solder that point and any other with a crack in it. make sure you don't solder 2 points together.


then just put it back together and in the jeep and your good to go.
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Unread 03-18-2011, 04:04 PM   #40
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Jerry did this article i feel its a must read for first time wheelers and those who own an Overland model WJ or those who want lockers/LSDs http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f19/w...ad-4wd-641869/
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Unread 03-18-2011, 07:16 PM   #41
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Projector Headlights and HIDs

There are many people selling projector headlight housings for WJs, but there are only three styles of projector headlights for WJs. All of these styles are available in chrome, black or smoked finishes.
The Gen I has three LEDs in upper corner near the grill.
The Gen II has a row of five oval lights along the bottom.
The Gen III looks most like stock with a bar along the bottom and 3 LEDs for the side turn signals.
There is no factory connection for the halos, but they can be spliced into the parking lights, turn signals, or fog lights.

HIDs should only be put in projector housings so that you don't blind on-coming cars. Also, only put them in the low beams. The warm up time makes them unsuitable for high beams. 6000K bulbs are generally recommended, though some people like 5000K bulbs. There are also many vedors for HID kits, but DDM Tuning is a popular source.
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Unread 03-18-2011, 07:46 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aathos View Post
Projector Headlights and HIDs

There are many people selling projector headlight housings for WJs, but there are only three styles of projector headlights for WJs. All of these styles are available in chrome, black or smoked finishes.
The Gen I has three LEDs in upper corner near the grill.
The Gen II has a row of five oval lights along the bottom.
The Gen III looks most like stock with a bar along the bottom and 3 LEDs for the side turn signals.
There is no factory connection for the halos, but they can be spliced into the parking lights, turn signals, or fog lights.

HIDs should only be put in projector housings so that you don't blind on-coming cars. Also, only put them in the low beams. The warm up time makes them unsuitable for high beams. 6000K bulbs are generally recommended, though some people like 5000K bulbs. There are also many vedors for HID kits, but DDM Tuning is a popular source.
good info i can add

- the projection housing on ebay and the web for the GC use a 9006 bulb for the low so the light is aimed a bit center with a standard bulb or hid kit compared to a real projection lens.
-still have to adjust the housing since they might be off.
-most people go for 6000K since it has a hint of blue. 4300K will give you the most light output. a car with factory HID is at 4900K
-55W HID kit are 40% brighter than the standard 35w kits. since they are brighter the life is less on a bulbs.
- a 55W kit end to wash out some of the color of the HID bulb due to the light output (for example, a 55w 8000k will look similar in color to a 35w 6000k kit).
-55W kits are not good for fogs due to the heat in a small spot
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Unread 03-22-2011, 10:24 PM   #43
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Here is my complete writeup on adding a 2nd WJ steering stabilizer by making your own kit.
http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f310/...te-up-1181314/
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Unread 05-02-2011, 12:36 PM   #44
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Here is a half assed write up (more for information sake) on installing an Aussie Locker in the WJ Dana 35.

http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f310/...nstall-1208490
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Unread 05-07-2011, 09:02 PM   #45
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Thought this was useful since a lot of people seem to ask what axle they have
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