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Unread 02-05-2004, 07:43 PM   #1
WXman
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2001 WJ 
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: , Kentucky
Posts: 3,376
How does the 4x4 system work exactly?

I wanted to buy a Liberty with the turbo-diesel. I want one of those BAD. But they weren't available so I bought a 2003 Ford Ranger instead. Now it looks like the turbo-diesel Libbys will be out in the U.S. by the end of the year. I am thinking about getting one when they come out. But I have a couple of questions:

1.) How does the 4x4 drivetrain work on the Jeeps? On my Ranger FX4, the front half-shafts are always locked in, and the front differential is always locked in. The only disconnect point is at the t-case. This makes for a virtually bulletproof design. I hear that the Jeeps do use a different 4x4 system. How does it work?

2.) If I buy a Liberty, I want the manual transmission. Are these dependable and strong? Anyone have any complaints with them?

Thanks in advance guys/girls.

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Unread 02-06-2004, 01:30 PM   #2
det69
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Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Crestview, FL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WXman
I wanted to buy a Liberty with the turbo-diesel. I want one of those BAD. But they weren't available so I bought a 2003 Ford Ranger instead. Now it looks like the turbo-diesel Libbys will be out in the U.S. by the end of the year. I am thinking about getting one when they come out. But I have a couple of questions:

1.) How does the 4x4 drivetrain work on the Jeeps? On my Ranger FX4, the front half-shafts are always locked in, and the front differential is always locked in. The only disconnect point is at the t-case. This makes for a virtually bulletproof design. I hear that the Jeeps do use a different 4x4 system. How does it work?

2.) If I buy a Liberty, I want the manual transmission. Are these dependable and strong? Anyone have any complaints with them?

Thanks in advance guys/girls.
The following website should shed some light on how the system works. There will be a pic in the center of the page, select either the command trac or selec-trac hot link and it will play a flash video describing each.

http://www.jeep.com/liberty/4_wheel_...e=left&mtNav=0
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Unread 02-11-2004, 08:34 PM   #3
WXman
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2001 WJ 
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: , Kentucky
Posts: 3,376
Well, I guess I need to be more specific. For example, on my Ranger FX4 there are NO automatic/manual hubs at all. So there is nothing that can malfunction at the wheels. There is no disconnect at the front differential...so there can't be a failure there either. The only engage/disengage area is at the transfer case. This makes for a nearly bullet-proof design.

What I'm wondering is: how does the Jeep 4x4 system work mechanically? Are there auto hubs? Vacuum actuated differential? Electronics?
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Unread 02-12-2004, 07:28 AM   #4
DarkRubiTJ
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Join Date: Oct 2003
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The Liberty t-case is very similar to your Ranger. No disconnects no electronics, a pretty much "bulletproof design". It should be a seamless transition from your Ford. Fords website is, vague at best on transfer case info. The Jeep transfer case is a tried and true design, same one that is in use in the Wrangler (except the Rubicon). I didn't see if the Rangers t-case is 2 speed, if not the Jeeps is, it's a huge advantage over the Ranger. Jeeps do have a mechanical shift on the fly where as Ranger lists an electronic. Jeeps tend to use heavy duty components for transmissions and transfer cases. The manual trannys remind me of the old "crash" boxes you found in trucks in the 60's and 70's noisy as the dickens but reliable as a rock. I drove my 94 YJ for several thousand miles with bad syncros and it crashed and crunched but never let me down.

Last edited by DarkRubiTJ; 02-12-2004 at 07:48 AM..
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Unread 02-12-2004, 05:30 PM   #5
WXman
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2001 WJ 
 
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: , Kentucky
Posts: 3,376
Yes my t-case is two speed. I have 2.48:1 low range, and high range 4-wheel as well as a 2-wheel setting. What I don't like about the electronic shift is there is no neutral setting. I assume that the Jeeps have a neutral setting? Sounds like the Jeep setup is a good one...thanks for the reply.
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