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Unread 08-07-2011, 07:44 PM   #16
1983Chief
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guns, beer, ductape, more beer, and a welder.

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Unread 08-07-2011, 07:57 PM   #17
AWOL007
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I agree that a friend, in another Jeep, is the best thing you could have out there. Not only for the safety factors, but it adds to the fun. It's fun pulling a friend out of the hard spot. It also helps you be a little more adventurous and you might try something a little more challenging knowing someone is there in case your stuck.

2nd would be a tow strap.
3rd is water (mostly in the summer months) in a cooler with lots of ice. (if you think you brought enough water bring more)
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Unread 08-07-2011, 08:08 PM   #18
Jerry Bransford
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 1983Chief View Post
guns, beer, ductape, more beer, and a welder.
[rant-on]Beer and guns... not a combination I'll ever have or allow with any group I lead. I'd have a gun hidden away in my TJ any day but I'll never be drinking beer on the trail. That stuff is for once you're back at camp and done wheeling for the day. It's simply never a good idea to drink anything alcoholic on the trail. No one drinks any beer on any trail I lead. Not even during lunch, beer on the trail just causes too many problems.[/rant-off]
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Unread 08-07-2011, 08:38 PM   #19
hrt4me
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Originally Posted by billzcat1 View Post
I think for a casual wheeler there are definitely some must-haves, and a lot of the threads in here of late are more for the folks that are already well-experienced and maybe a little harder than people trying to get into the sport.

1)Someone to wheel with. Having another rig on the trail gives you more options for recovery if you're stuck or transport if you break down/get injured. I do fairly mild trails, but if I broke an axle I wouldn't want to try to walk out when I'm 30 miles from even a pay phone. Even having a passenger is helpful so you can have someone spot you in tight spots and help you get recovered. Find a local club and you'll get a lot of experience with good folks. I've never met an automotive community more friendly than Jeepers.

2)Communication. If you wheel somewhere with cell service, great, but most of where I go you have no cell reception at all. CB/Ham/FRS radios are a must to communicate with other rigs or call for help. So far, CB seems the most popular.

3)Full size spare tire. A donut spare will not do the job. If you get somewhere on your 33" MTs and then tear a sidewall, no air compressor/OBA will do the job and your original 30" spare tire will not be large enough to get out. Tires come in sets of 5 when you own a Jeep. Plus you can do 5 tire rotations and get 25% greater lifespan from the set.

4)Recovery points/gear. At a bare minimum, you need a solid recovery point front and rear. Tow hooks, trailer hitch w/D-ring....and add a 20' tow strap with looped ends. A couple 3/4" d-rings will help you attach your strap to various vehicles. I also added a J-hook and a 10,000 lb grab hook for pulls.

5)Food and water. Self explanatory.

That should cover your needs for an average "getting started" wheeling trip. As far as the vehicle build/rig prep is concerned, that's a whole different story and has 1000 "right" answers depending on the rig and how/where it will be used.

Adding to this: here's a list I've posted a few times which is a list of local club requirements. Some these things can be loaned if you don't have it (ie first aid kit, air compressor) but some can't (like spare tires)
  • Driver's license
  • Proof of Insurance for you and the rig you are driving
  • Valid / current vehicle registration for the rig you are driving
  • Recovery points (tow hooks or shackles), preferably front and rear, so someone can assist from the front or back of your rig.
  • Hi-Lift style jack
  • Fullsize spare tire (no temporary spares, or spares that don't work on your rig)
  • Tow strap
  • Gloves
  • Basic tools
  • First aid kit
  • Parking brake that works
  • Functional CB radio
  • Seat belts for all people in your rig
  • Fire Extinguisher
  • FUEL!!!!! and enough of it to get you there and back... some trips may not encounter a fuel stop along the route.
  • Money (cash) !! (to buy more fuel, or food, or whatever!)
  • Additional Items recommended for winter/Snow runs:
  • Warm gloves, and a spare pair
  • Extra jacket, or maybe a rain jacket.
  • Ski Pants help to stay dry and warm
  • Boots
  • Towel or two - helps to dry off your jacket when it gets snow covered!
  • Front and rear recovery points are pretty much a MUST for snow runs!!!
  • Shovel for removing snow from around your tires when you get stuck
  • Willingness to AIR DOWN - makes a huge difference in handling

Adding to it (my own personal choices)
  • 12v Air Compressor/CO2 system to air back up. Even a $60 compressor works great.
  • Maps of the trails you are on. A Nav is nice, but often a MAP is nicer.
  • BASIC survival gear - compass, food, flashlight, knife. Boy Scout motto: BE PREPARED. No need to pack a whole campground, but its better to have it and never use it than need it and not have it.
  • ZERO tolerance for drinking/drugs on-trail.
thanks, this is very helpful for a newbie like me
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Unread 08-08-2011, 10:34 AM   #20
Joe-Jeep
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All very helpful and I get what most people are saying. Sounds like I will need to spend as much to prep for off roading as I will for my jeep.

Here is what I mean and a reason why I was asking.... I don't think anyone on here is made of money...

Jack (Hi Lift = about $80)
CB ($not sure, but I will settle on my cell phone)
Tow Straps (at least $30 for one, need more than that probably)
Winch ($400 installed at least)
D-Rings (about $12 a piece)
Snatch block ($35)
Fire extinguisher (guessing about $15)
Front and rear recovery points (could cost hundreds of dollars if you don't have a bumper with them already on - we'll call it $200 because I don't).
Air compressor (I have a basic one, but let's say about $30)
Basic tools, flashlight, fire-starter, first aid kit ($50)

So that adds up to a little under $1000.00. I don't have a grand to drop right now on all this stuff so I can go off roading.

Therefore, the reason I asked was I need to plan accordingly what I need to buy first and what is most important. I would say eventually I might get everything everyone lists, but I need to figure out what is most cost-effective and most important. And please remember where "I" am coming from in saying this. Just bought a jeep. Nice paint job on it now and "new to me". So not planning on going over 3 foot boulders if I can help it or down trails that are 4 feet wide lined with thick branches. Just wanted to go down some 6 foot wide trails/tote roads, over a few 1-2 foot rocks, through some mud, etc. Not going out in Pittsburgh, NH. Would like to stay in southern NH and do some off roading and have a good time (beer after I get home!)....

And I was wondering. If I bring a welder, do I have to pack food and water for him as well?

Thanks for everyone's opinion, it is very helpful!
Joe
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Unread 08-08-2011, 12:05 PM   #21
Trevino
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe-Jeep

So that adds up to a little under $1000.00. I don't have a grand to drop right now on all this stuff so I can go off roading.
That's why going with at least one more person is so beneficial. If he has a winch and strap then all you need is recovery points. If your going on a short trip like you stated. You packing a cooler with water and food is plenty for both of you. On a normal trip I wheel with at least 4 other mouths and take a case of water and some sandwiches. More often than not there is left over water and food

Basically if you wheel with a partner the list of tools and everything else can be split.
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Unread 08-08-2011, 12:29 PM   #22
MountainMan864
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White Grape Cigarillo is a must lol. Tow Straps,u-joints, tools, water. fluids.
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Unread 08-08-2011, 01:56 PM   #23
billzcat1
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Comments inserted in your post


Jack (Hi Lift = about $80)
Not a Must Have, a lot of folks don't like them/don't use them
CB ($not sure, but I will settle on my cell phone)
CB is MUCH easier to communicate with since it is PTT. $40 gets you a decent handheld with no installation required
Tow Straps (at least $30 for one, need more than that probably)
An entry-level tow strap is $20 and works just fine for easy/medium wheeling
Winch ($400 installed at least)
Not a Must-Have, but nice to have. Unless you wheel alone, hit heavy mud or snow, a tow strap does the majority of recoveries.
D-Rings (about $12 a piece)
Sounds about right
Snatch block ($35)
No need for a snatch block if you don't have a winch
Fire extinguisher (guessing about $15)
Sure
Front and rear recovery points (could cost hundreds of dollars if you don't have a bumper with them already on - we'll call it $200 because I don't).
Could probably get some take-offs from someone who bought a new bumper. Trailer hitch serves as the rear recovery point very well.
Air compressor (I have a basic one, but let's say about $30)
No 12v compressor less than $60 is worth a damn. The good news is the $60 MV-50 is a GREAT compressor for that price.
Basic tools, flashlight, fire-starter, first aid kit ($50)
Maybe a bit more, tools are not cheap.

For what you NEED to get on the trail, maybe $300 at most. You don't need a winch to go down fire roads. Most people who have them rarely ever use them.
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Unread 08-08-2011, 05:27 PM   #24
Trevino
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I can agree with what was said above man. A winch is great but I a year of owning mine. It's only been used in the driveway to make sure it worked. A snatch block like was stated goes hand in hand with a winch. A cb is better than a phone, believe me. After having been on the trail and having called and hung up like 4 or 5 times I love my cb. Truthfully I would say get yourself some tools and start some small projects to get yourself more comfortable with a wrench and some recovery gear. Tools and recovery options seems like they can be of the moat benefit to you.
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Unread 08-08-2011, 08:25 PM   #25
boucherbuilders
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jerry Bransford View Post
[rant-on]Beer and guns... not a combination I'll ever have or allow with any group I lead. I'd have a gun hidden away in my TJ any day but I'll never be drinking beer on the trail. That stuff is for once you're back at camp and done wheeling for the day. It's simply never a good idea to drink anything alcoholic on the trail. No one drinks any beer on any trail I lead. Not even during lunch, beer on the trail just causes too many problems.[/rant-off]
O man the fun police are here
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Unread 08-09-2011, 07:16 PM   #26
NashvilleTJ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IEcrawlerTJ01 View Post
But one thing EVERY single
Jeep should have ATLEAST one of is....

CRESCENT WRENCH!!!!!!! I have three in my tool bag. Different sizes and such. It's so handy cuz it's any size wrench you need when you need it to be. Even odd sizes. A good crescent has saved me many times and I would never go anywhere without one in my tool bag.
X2 - But unfortunately, these days you have to carry both an SAE and a metric crescent wrench....
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Unread 08-09-2011, 07:35 PM   #27
danielbuck
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Originally Posted by Joe-Jeep View Post
Hi All,

Newer to the site and have seen some people talk about having certain things on the trails, but I was looking for simple lists from people. Some discussions talk about winches vs come alongs, different types of tow straps, Hi Lift Jacks, snatch blocks, etc.

So my question is what are the top things you Must Have and maybe a list of Should Have with you at all times. I would say a flashlight is a Should Have and a Jack, Rope, etc is a Must Have. But would be looking for your opinions. Here are some things I am thinking of....

Winch
Come Along
Hi Lift Jack
Straps/Rope/Chain
Snatch Block
Fix a flat (2)
Flashlight/batteries
Ax/Shovel (should have?)
Food/snacks/water (should have?)


Thank you,
Joe
A way to air up the tires. I would add that to your list. Airing down the tires for me is a must-do. Leaving traction benefits aside, just the smoother ride alone is well worth airing the tires down. Even if there were no traction benefits at all, I would still air down to get the smoother more enjoyable ride (passengers will enjoy this quite a bit as well!). And if you are airing them down far enough to get a nice smooth ride, then you are going to need a way to air them back up before you hit the highway to get back home.

Quote:
Originally Posted by boucherbuilders View Post
O man the fun police are here
better the fun police, than the real police
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Unread 11-14-2011, 05:04 PM   #28
LYTSOUT
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http://www.gatrailriders.com/trailrides.php

above is a link to our jeep club's "must-haves". you probably have a jeep club near you and they no doubt have a list similar to the one above. the nice thing about a club is you always have jerry's #5 (other jeeps) around!
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Unread 11-14-2011, 05:09 PM   #29
LYTSOUT
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Originally Posted by Joe-Jeep View Post

And I was wondering. If I bring a welder, do I have to pack food and water for him as well?
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Unread 11-14-2011, 06:28 PM   #30
jamesdart
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spark plug socket and any other sockets or tools you might need to get to the plugs
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