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Unread 07-08-2007, 10:22 PM   #1
CHRRRIS
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Nylon vs. Polyester Recovery straps?

Is there a difference between the two materials used as recovery straps?

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Unread 07-09-2007, 06:59 AM   #2
ovrszd
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I'm not a techno type so my terminology might not be right on. With that said, my experiences over the past thirty years with straps and ropes is that I prefer nylon. Seems to be more durable and has a softer yank. I've had several used Barge Ropes that were polyester and got along fine with them with the only issue being durability. But then I was using ropes that had the "dog" pulled out of them holding barges.

With straps and/or ropes, you get exactly what you pay for. But a quality product. Take care of it by rinsing it off after getting it muddy or dragging it thru sand. The grit you leave in it will do a lot of damage as it stretches and rebounds.

I have a winch for heavy retrieval and only use a strap for quick, light pulls of trail buddies. In that regard I prefer a strap because it's easier to store. If I were depending solely on my strap or rope for recovery, I would prefer a rope because generally it will provide a higher percent of stretch and will be a little softer when yanked.

Twenty years ago before my gang had winches we used ropes of various sizes and lengths. If you have multiple vehicles pulling one stuck vehicle you want a stronger rope fastened on the stuck vehicle to handle the pull of more than one vehicle. Then as you go out the line of vehicles you want smaller ropes to allow stretch. In other words, you don't want one vehicle pulling on a 10' 3" diameter rope because you will get no stretch and it will hit almost as hard as yanking a chain. Opposite affect is using a 1" rope tied to the stuck vehicle and pulling on it with multiple vehicles. At a minimum you will yank the stretch out of it, worse case you will yank it in two.

Last point to make is that ropes/straps are extremely dangerous. I couldn't think of a stronger way to describe that. Extremely dangerous is understated!!! When you start stacking up vehicles and/or ropes and straps for a complex pull you have to evaluate every item that is entered into the equation including the hitch points on each vehicle. I have an old photo hanging in my shop of a Chevy pickup with a 30' barge rope and a clevis up over the hood, thru the windshield and out the back cab window, across the length of the bed and laying on the ground stretched out behind the pickup. Fortunately for the driver he did not have a passenger sitting in the middle. If I have to get slack and yank on someone I always lay down in the seat and I ask the other driver to do the same. Please apply the same caution when you use yours. That way we won't be reading a post on here about someone being killed by their strap or rope. One more time I'll say EXTREMELY DANGEROUS.
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Unread 07-09-2007, 11:34 AM   #3
CHRRRIS
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Thanks for the reply.

First off I'll say, EXTREMELY DANGEROUS! (I know, lol) I've seen videos and heard stories, I've had two snap in half trying to pull me out of a BAD stuck. I know, NO HOOKS, they are for towing NOT for recovery...very dangerous stuff.

Anyways, I'm only looking to buy a strap (no rope for me), but I've recently seen some made of nylon and some made of polyester... It got me curious, if anyone still has a reply for that, post up!
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Unread 09-21-2014, 08:14 PM   #4
GopherBaroque
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Polyester Recovery Strap

Polyester recovery straps stretch only about 2 to 3 percent at full force. The upside of this characteristic is a controlled pull. You can more easily predict how the strap will react under load, which means you can more easily prevent damage to the vehicles involved in the recovery. The downside of this characteristic is that the strap will jerk when the line becomes taught, so if you try for a running start, do it at your own risk. The force of the jerk can damage frames, bumpers, and other tow points.

Polyester straps are more commonly used than nylon straps, in part because they are more universal. Besides serving as a recovery strap, a poly strap can be used for towing. They are also safer because they won’t recoil if they break.
Nylon Recovery Straps

Nylon straps stretch like a rubber band. They are good to use when you need a running start, especially when traction is poor—for example, if you’re pulling a vehicle out of sand, mud, loose gravel, or snow and ice. They are also good to use when the vehicle making the recovery doesn’t have enough power to tug from a standstill. The downside of this stretchy characteristic is that nylon straps can be dangerous if used improperly because of the amount of energy stored in the strap. If the strap breaks, it can damage vehicles or injure bystanders.

http://blog.promarkoffroad.com/2010/...ter-and-nylon/
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Unread 09-21-2014, 08:44 PM   #5
wilson1010
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When we say no hooks, we really mean no hooks. No, they are not just for towing. They are for ****. If you have any straps with hooks attached at the end, toss them now.

As for polyester v. Nylon: Polyester is far more durable than nylon. It does not cut as easily it does not scuff or abrade. Nylon does stretch. Stretch is a theoretical benefit important only to the sellers of what are called "snatch straps" which are of no use other than looking good in a recovery kit.

You want to buy two yellow 30' x 4" polyester straps loops at both ends, and two 3/4" D-shackles. With proper tow points on your rig and your buddies; rigs that will be all you will ever need unless a winch is required.
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