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Unread 08-07-2011, 01:23 PM   #61
armyRN
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Don't quote me, cause this will never stand up in court.

The paperwork that came with my trailer said no more than 45 mph (I just went and looked at it to confirm). I don't know if that's related to the trailer itself, or if they're figuring folks don't know how to drive towing a trailer so they keep in on the slow side. For what it's worth, I've seen the U-haul trailers with large lettering saying "max speed 45 mph". Here's how I looked at it:

1. Bearings - the taller the tire, the larger the tire circumference. The larger the tire circumference, the fewer times the tire has to rotate per mile, keeping the bearings from getting too hot (by not spinning as fast at a given speed). A tire on a 12" rim is better than a tire on an 8" rim, and a tire on a 15" rim is better still.

2. Bearings - While the factory bearings may be adequate, make sure you pack them with a good quality grease before taking the trailer on the highway.

3. Tires - better quality tires, less chance of a blow-out. Keep them properly inflated.

4. Tires - getting the tires balanced means less chance of trailer bounce. Have you ever seen a trailer bouncing behind a vehicle? I have.

5. Load your trailer properly. Don't overload it. Put more of the weight in the front half of the trailer (it's in the paperwork that comes with your trailer).

6. I don't know how much of a difference this makes, but keep your trailer level when attached to your Jeep. Get the proper size drop hitch (see picture below).

On both trips I took with my trailer loaded with camping gear (once with the 12" rims, and once with the 15" rims) I sometimes was doing 70 mph. When I took the trailer to Moab, I spent hours on the highway (1100 miles one way, and I went there and back) doing between 60 and 70 mph with no issues.

Of course, safety is tops. Make sure your hitch is secure (both from your Jeep and the trailer), tires are in good condition, bearings are lubed, lights work, trailer loaded properly, etc. If you do all that, you should be good to go on the highway.

This picture is one I took when driving to Moab, and stopped at a Wendys for dinner, probably somewhere in Idaho.

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Unread 08-11-2011, 10:05 PM   #62
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Amazing write up. I love everything you have done with this trailer, keep up the good work.
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Unread 08-12-2011, 10:32 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by NUTKINS View Post
Amazing write up. I love everything you have done with this trailer, keep up the good work.
Thanks for the compliments. It was a fun project, and I've really got to experience how useful this little trailer can be. It pulls easily behind my four-cylinder TJ, and even has a few more inches of clearance under the trailer axle than does my Jeep's rear axle with 33" tires. And you'd be amazed at how much stuff (in my case camping gear/tools/etc.) will fit in the trailer, yet it doesn't take up that much space in my garage. Hopefully if this thread has inspired others, they'll post up pictures of their little trailers (especially if they've put on wider axles and larger tires). I'd love to see them.



University of Central Florida (UCF), Orlando Florida, class of 1988 School of Nursing
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Unread 08-16-2011, 07:12 PM   #64
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I've been pricing out everything for the past couple days. It should be similar to your build with a few minor tweeks. I have been thinking alot about tire size in relation to the size of the trailer. I know you have 27.4" tires on your build, but I was thinking around 31"-33" tires. I'm wondering how less room I'd have on either side of the trailer in front and behind each tire (Would there be enough room to mount a Jerry can uprite), or a propaine tank?

Another question I have on the model you have is the amount of room you have on the tongue? The dimensions of the triangle? I went exploring on the Harbor freight website and was wondering if the Trailer Tongue toolboxes they sell are to big? The cheap one I found -- http://www.harborfreight.com/steel-t...box-65439.html

Inside dimensions: 14" L x 20-3/4" - 33-1/2" W x 12-3/4" deep

Any updates on your trailer?

-Ben.
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Unread 08-16-2011, 10:15 PM   #65
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NUTKINS View Post
I've been pricing out everything for the past couple days. It should be similar to your build with a few minor tweeks. I have been thinking alot about tire size in relation to the size of the trailer. I know you have 27.4" tires on your build, but I was thinking around 31"-33" tires. I'm wondering how less room I'd have on either side of the trailer in front and behind each tire (Would there be enough room to mount a Jerry can uprite), or a propaine tank?

Another question I have on the model you have is the amount of room you have on the tongue? The dimensions of the triangle? I went exploring on the Harbor freight website and was wondering if the Trailer Tongue toolboxes they sell are to big? The cheap one I found -- http://www.harborfreight.com/steel-trailer-tongue-box-65439.html

Inside dimensions: 14" L x 20-3/4" - 33-1/2" W x 12-3/4" deep

Any updates on your trailer?

-Ben.
Nothing new on the trailer. It's still sitting in the garage being used as an empty box holder, waiting for our next adventure.

I've thought about a trailer tongue box before, but then I'd have to move the spare. I could put the spare on the back of the trailer, but then I wouldn't have the gas can. I decided I didn't really need the extra space the trailer tongue box would provide.

Anyways, I went out and took some measurements on the trailer. These are based on my 205/75/15 tires that really measure 26.75" unloaded (I measured the spare).

These distances (unless otherwise stated) are measurements at the frame level height (where the tire sits at the same level as the frame, not the furthest it protrudes front or rear).

Looking at the side of the trailer (first picture):

From front of frame to edge of tire - 18"
From front of frame to front edge of fender - 17"

From rear of frame to edge of tire - 13"
From rear of frame to edge of fender - 12"

From backside of tail light to edge of tire (at the frame level) - 7"
Closest distance from tail light to edge of tire - 4"

Looking at the front of the trailer (second picture):

Frame width - 40"
Width of the "triangle" where it exits the front of the frame - 25"
Distance forward from frame to tip of the "triangle" - 20"
Length of the trailer tongue from frame edge to end of ball mount - 36"
So you have an additional 16" from the tip of the triangle to the end of the trailer tongue.
(the "Red" trailer's tongue is 10-12" shorter than the "Black" trailer's)

Width of a Blitz Gerry can holder - 15"
Depth of a Blitz Gerry can holder - 7"

The flat gas cans like I have mounted on the back of the trailer works well for me. It holds 4 gallons, and some brands (I think Rotopax) are stackable (third picture).

I hope this helps you. Good luck, and let us know how we can help you.

Please post pictures of your finished trailer, and include measurements (i.e.: axle hub face to hub face measurments, wheel backspacing and width), part numbers, etc. I'm sure others like the idea of putting tires on their little trailer that match their Jeep's tire/rim package. Take careful measurements before you go getting your axle - you don't want it too wide or not wide enough (you'll want about 1.5 - 2" clearance between the sidewall edge of the tire and the trailer frame). And if you're going with 31" or 33" tires, you'll probably need a heavier duty axle than the 1800lb axle I used, and you'll definitely need to find some other fenders (factor fenders in when thinking about mounting Gerry cans on the sides of the trailer).

Between the head of the bolt for the springs and the side of my tire the measurement is 1.25". The head of the spring bolt sticks out further than the edge of the frame. Something to keep in mind when deciding on larger tires and axle width. With the 12" tires, the tires aren't large enough to reach that far.
dscn0325.jpg   dscn0294.1jpg.jpg   dscn0327.1jpg.jpg  
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Unread 08-17-2011, 01:57 PM   #66
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Wooden stakeside board measurements (see pictures above in previous post):

Someone once asked me for the measurements for the wood sides, and he had a black trailer. Here's what I sent him:

Ok, print this off and be looking at the picture(s) of the trailer as you're reading this so it will make sense. There will be 24 boards total: eight for the long sides (left and right side), eight for the front and back sides, and eight total for the upright stakes. Here are the measurements:

Long sides: 47" long with a 1/4" hole drilled 7" from each end and centered on the board.

Front and back: 38 1/8" long with a 1/4" hole drilled 9" from each end and centered on the board.

Upright stakes: 25" long with 1/4" holes drilled (starting from the top and centered on the board) at 1 3/4", 7 1/4", 12 3/4", and 18 1/4". Once you put the stakes into the pockets then you can mark where to drill the hole that bolts it to the frame. I also beveled the top of the upright stakes at a 45 degree angle just because I could (you might be able to see it in the pictures).

Hardware: I used 1/4" carriage bolts 1 1/2" long. I countersunk the side and front/back boards (using a 7/8" wood boring bit) about a half-inch so there would be no protruding hardware into the trailer bed. You'll need 32 of the 1/4" carriage bolts, and eight larger ones (3/8"? - 1/2"?; I don't remember. It's the same size as the ones you use to put the trailer together - and about 2" long at least). For each carriage bolt I used a washer and a nylock locking nut. The square part of the 1/4" carriage bolt bites into the wood to hold it in place. Or you can just use 1/4" bolts 1 1/2" long - I just like the look of the carriage bolts.

And you can substitute eight ring bolts (I don't know exactly what to call them, but you can see them in the pictures replacing the second from the top carriage bolts all around the trailer) instead of the carriage bolts. It gives you something to attach tie-down straps to.

Or if you didn't want to deal with countersinking holes, you could get 2" long 1/4" carriage bolts, and put them in from the inside of the trailer bed so the nuts and washers are on the outside of the trailer. The main thing is you want as little as possible protruding into the trailer, and carriage bolt head will be almost flush with the wood once you tighten it down if you go this route.

In the corners I used some 90 degree little metal brackets (16 total) I got from Home Depot (visible in pictures above). Each one is held in place with six small wood screws. Mainly I did this to keep it all tied in together. You could also get some larger brackets and put them on the outside of the trailer boards.

I cut and drilled all the boards, and then stained and varnished them before putting it all together.

And to answer your question as to how tall my box is; from the floor to the top rail of the wood it is 22.5".
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Unread 08-20-2011, 10:21 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NUTKINS View Post
I've been pricing out everything for the past couple days. It should be similar to your build with a few minor tweeks. I have been thinking alot about tire size in relation to the size of the trailer. I know you have 27.4" tires on your build, but I was thinking around 31"-33" tires. I'm wondering how less room I'd have on either side of the trailer in front and behind each tire (Would there be enough room to mount a Jerry can uprite), or a propaine tank?

Another question I have on the model you have is the amount of room you have on the tongue? The dimensions of the triangle? I went exploring on the Harbor freight website and was wondering if the Trailer Tongue toolboxes they sell are to big? The cheap one I found -- http://www.harborfreight.com/steel-t...box-65439.html

Inside dimensions: 14" L x 20-3/4" - 33-1/2" W x 12-3/4" deep

Any updates on your trailer?

-Ben.
I was at Harbor Freight today (20 Aug) and they had two small trailer tongue boxes for sale - one for $99 and one for $75.

But you got me thinking. I need to mount an ammo can or something on the tongue right in front of the spare to hold my spare hub/bearing set, spare lug nuts, and maybe if space allows a small lug wrench and a small hydraulic jack. I'll have to get some measurements and see what I can do, check out some Army Surplus stores, etc. Right now I have the spare hub assembly in a sealed round tin can that I have to put inside the trailer bed when I take the trailer somewhere. I'll post pictures if/when I get it done.

I know right now my tailgate clears the spare tire on the trailer when it swings out with minimal room to spare, so I'll have to see how high I can go on the ammo can to still clear the tailgate swinging out. Or I could mount it on the side of the trailer in front of the fender. We'll see. I've been needing a small project. Thanks for the prod!
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Unread 08-21-2011, 06:34 AM   #68
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armyRN View Post

Looking at the side of the trailer (first picture):

From front of frame to edge of tire - 18"
From front of frame to front edge of fender - 17"

From rear of frame to edge of tire - 13"
From rear of frame to edge of fender - 12"

Looking at the front of the trailer (second picture):

Frame width - 40"
Width of the "triangle" where it exits the front of the frame - 25"
Distance forward from frame to tip of the "triangle" - 20"
Length of the trailer tongue from frame edge to end of ball mount - 36"
So you have an additional 16" from the tip of the triangle to the end of the trailer tongue.

Width of a Blitz Gerry can holder - 15"
Depth of a Blitz Gerry can holder - 7"


I hope this helps you. Good luck, and let us know how we can help you.

Please post pictures of your finished trailer, and include measurements (i.e.: axle hub face to hub face measurments, wheel backspacing and width), part numbers, etc. I'm sure others like the idea of putting tires on their little trailer that match their Jeep's tire/rim package. Take careful measurements before you go getting your axle - you don't want it too wide or not wide enough (you'll want about 1.5 - 2" clearance between the sidewall edge of the tire and the trailer frame). And if you're going with 31" or 33" tires, you'll probably need a heavier duty axle than the 1800lb axle I used, and you'll definitely need to find some other fenders (factor fenders in when thinking about mounting Gerry cans on the sides of the trailer).

Thanks a bunch for the measurements, I'd think even riding a 31" or 33" tire i'd be able to squeeze a jerry can in the front. With that said mounting the trailer tongue toolbox is the only thing I am worried about. I've got the old mount off my jeep for a spare tire carrier that I'd like to mount on the back of the trailer but I am worried that with the size and weight of a 33" tire on the back of a microsized trailer the tongue may be looking at the sky when I unhook it from the truck. Or I could put a few rocks inside the toolbox on the front and hope the weight is enough to keep it down.

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Unread 08-21-2011, 06:39 AM   #69
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Also, I was wondering about axle hub to hub spacing. Whys it such a big deal if I have a little more room then 2" clearance between the sidewall and the edge of the trailer? I prob need to do a detailed search on that when the time comes.
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Unread 08-21-2011, 09:37 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NUTKINS View Post
Also, I was wondering about axle hub to hub spacing. Whys it such a big deal if I have a little more room then 2" clearance between the sidewall and the edge of the trailer? I prob need to do a detailed search on that when the time comes.
The axle manufacturers have limits as to how far the hub on the axle can extend out past the mounting point on the springs. Too far out and the axle can start to bend (think leverage). You'll find out when you start researching it and looking at the manufacturer's sites. If you put a 3500 lb axle on one of these little trailers it shouldn't be an issue since you'll never get near the axle's max capacity. What you definitely don't want to happen is have the axle too narrow so the tire is rubbing on the trailer frame.

Plus you might have issues getting fenders wide enough to cover your tire if you're going wide with the axle and wide with the tires.
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Unread 08-24-2011, 05:51 PM   #71
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Hopefully ArmyRN won't mind me posting in his thread about this, since he's the one that brought his thread to my attention.

I'm considering building molds for making fiberglass "Jeep-style" tubs. The tubs would have identical styling to Jeep tubs, and would accept Jeep CJ tailgates (or even the side-swinging Wrangler tailgates). The molds could be used to make tubs of any length up to about 8' long, including tubs would fit on the Harbor Freight trailers.

I've done some research on the sizes of trailers available at places like Harbor Freight, Northern Tool, etc., and it seems there are two common sizes that might make sense to throw fiberglass tubs on - 4'x8' and 40" x 48". These trailers are very affordable as well, and come in several load capacities (and prices).

Here's the larger of the two, I've drawn the tub slightly transparent so you can see the frame and tires below it. I've made the tub on this one slightly shorter than 8' so the Safari Cab Overland Camper top can fit on it (more on that in a second); that's slightly less than the 8' trailer frame, so I've thrown a steel mesh platform on the front (these trailers are bolt-together, so if you didn't want the overhang for the platform, you could cut the rails a little shorter to match the tub length). The axle track width is such that standard Jeep flares would be the right width to cover the tires.



And here's the smaller trailer, similar to what ArmyRN used in his build. The trailer frame is 48" long, but I've sized the tub at 46", because there's a tonneau cover on the market for Jeep half cans from Gr8Tops that's 46" long (although it wouldn't be hard to get other sizes made, including one for the longer trailer above). The track width of this one as it comes is narrow enough that flares wouldn't be necessary, the tires would fit within the wheel wells of the tub (kind of like the older narrow-track CJ's).



The longer of the two would be the proper size to fit the "Safari Cab Overland Camper top" so the trailer could be made into a mini-camper; here's a photo of a camper top still under construction (no windows yet):



It might be that these could be produced ready-to-install, or as a "kit" of parts for DIY assembly; the parts could be either bolted together or bonded with fiberglass. There would be side panels, end panels (either with tailgate openings or without), and inner fenders. The floor would be supplied by the DIY-er and probably would be 3/4" plywood.



Anyway, I'm posting here to get feedback on the fiberglass trailer tub idea from people who are interested in these harbor Freight trailer frames. What do you think of the idea?
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Unread 08-25-2011, 10:18 AM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jscherb View Post
Hopefully ArmyRN won't mind me posting in his thread about this, since he's the one that brought his thread to my attention.

I'm considering building molds for making fiberglass "Jeep-style" tubs. The tubs would have identical styling to Jeep tubs, and would accept Jeep CJ tailgates (or even the side-swinging Wrangler tailgates). The molds could be used to make tubs of any length up to about 8' long, including tubs would fit on the Harbor Freight trailers.

I've done some research on the sizes of trailers available at places like Harbor Freight, Northern Tool, etc., and it seems there are two common sizes that might make sense to throw fiberglass tubs on - 4'x8' and 40" x 48". These trailers are very affordable as well, and come in several load capacities (and prices).

Here's the larger of the two, I've drawn the tub slightly transparent so you can see the frame and tires below it. I've made the tub on this one slightly shorter than 8' so the Safari Cab Overland Camper top can fit on it (more on that in a second); that's slightly less than the 8' trailer frame, so I've thrown a steel mesh platform on the front (these trailers are bolt-together, so if you didn't want the overhang for the platform, you could cut the rails a little shorter to match the tub length). The axle track width is such that standard Jeep flares would be the right width to cover the tires.



And here's the smaller trailer, similar to what ArmyRN used in his build. The trailer frame is 48" long, but I've sized the tub at 46", because there's a tonneau cover on the market for Jeep half cans from Gr8Tops that's 46" long (although it wouldn't be hard to get other sizes made, including one for the longer trailer above). The track width of this one as it comes is narrow enough that flares wouldn't be necessary, the tires would fit within the wheel wells of the tub (kind of like the older narrow-track CJ's).



The longer of the two would be the proper size to fit the "Safari Cab Overland Camper top" so the trailer could be made into a mini-camper; here's a photo of a camper top still under construction (no windows yet):



It might be that these could be produced ready-to-install, or as a "kit" of parts for DIY assembly; the parts could be either bolted together or bonded with fiberglass. There would be side panels, end panels (either with tailgate openings or without), and inner fenders. The floor would be supplied by the DIY-er and probably would be 3/4" plywood.



Anyway, I'm posting here to get feedback on the fiberglass trailer tub idea from people who are interested in these harbor Freight trailer frames. What do you think of the idea?
Do I mind jscherb posting on this thread? Heck no! The purpose of starting this thread was to get folks talking about little trailers and exchanging ideas, so this is great. I hope more folks bring their little trailer ideas to this thread.

I think you're on to something with your little trailer tub idea(s). Especially the 4' trailers with the option of a tonneau cover to keep things dry. I'm thinking one issue that might keep folks from buying one of these little trailers is they don't know how to finish them off, and especially how to keep things dry.

A couple of issues I'm looking forward to seeing you address are:

1. The trailer tub extends past the sides of the trailer frame. Are you thinking about some simple frame extensions to support the lateral sides of the trailer tub? I know you could take a 3/4" thick sheet of plywood and cut it to fit the outline of the base of the fiberglass tub (to include the indents for the tires). I'm just wondering if without frame supports if the plywood might start to sag on the sides(?).

2. I'm looking forward to seeing how large a tire the tub is recessed for. I've got some skinny 27" tall tires on mine, and I think they look large on such a small trailer.

But I hope you're able to do a mini trailer project; I know you've got a lot of other projects in the works. If you do do a little trailer project, please feel free to post on this thread along with the other thread you're usually posting your projects on.

Here's a link to one of jscherb's projects. When he takes on a project, it comes out awesome. Check out near the end of his thread where he's talking about trailer projects.
http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f9/sa...roject-952157/
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Unread 08-25-2011, 03:50 PM   #73
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armyRN View Post
I think you're on to something with your little trailer tub idea(s). Especially the 4' trailers with the option of a tonneau cover to keep things dry. I'm thinking one issue that might keep folks from buying one of these little trailers is they don't know how to finish them off, and especially how to keep things dry.
I agree - if you're carrying anything other than maybe a lawnmower, a covered, weathertight trailer is a must.

Here's what the tonneau cover looks like on the larger size trailer (this is my metal-tub trailer, I haven't built any fiberglass ones yet ):



I've done plenty of towing of the yellow trailer in the rain and haven't had any issues with water getting in.

And here's the shorter version on a Gr8Tops half cab; this one would fit the mini-trailer tub I've designed:



Quote:
Originally Posted by armyRN View Post
A couple of issues I'm looking forward to seeing you address are:

1. The trailer tub extends past the sides of the trailer frame. Are you thinking about some simple frame extensions to support the lateral sides of the trailer tub? I know you could take a 3/4" thick sheet of plywood and cut it to fit the outline of the base of the fiberglass tub (to include the indents for the tires). I'm just wondering if without frame supports if the plywood might start to sag on the sides(?).
My design calls for crossmembers under the floor running all the way across the tub; the tub mounts to the frame via the crossmembers. The crossmembers will add the necessary stiffness and load-capacity to the tub.

Quote:
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2. I'm looking forward to seeing how large a tire the tub is recessed for. I've got some skinny 27" tall tires on mine, and I think they look large on such a small trailer.
I'm thinking of doing several different sized inner fenders:

- a "tiny" inner fender that's just enough to cover the stock 4.80x12's that come on the higher capacity red trailer.
- a medium inner fender that's large enough to deal with, say, 27" tires.
- a large inner fender that matches up with the wheel openings described by TJ flares, for larger tires (like on my yellow trailer).

For the largest inner fenders, TJ flares would be used. For the smaller two sizes, Pacer Universal flares would be used (if necessary, depending on your trailer's track width, the wheels may be completely inside the tub sides). The Pacer flares come in roughly 50" lengths and can be cut to whatever length needed and bent around the inside of the wheel opening. They resemble CJ/YJ flares:



In kit form, you could get whichever size inner fender you needed for your planned tire size, cut the wheel openings in the side panels to match, and install Pacer flares if necessary.

The way the fiberglass parts are designed, they can either be bolted together, or bonded together with fiberglass. An easy DIY assembly would have everything bolted together, and the floor and crossmembers bolted to the tub. The inner fenders would bolt to the tub and floor as well.
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Unread 08-26-2011, 11:32 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jscherb View Post
I agree - if you're carrying anything other than maybe a lawnmower, a covered, weathertight trailer is a must.

Here's what the tonneau cover looks like on the larger size trailer (this is my metal-tub trailer, I haven't built any fiberglass ones yet ):



I've done plenty of towing of the yellow trailer in the rain and haven't had any issues with water getting in.

And here's the shorter version on a Gr8Tops half cab; this one would fit the mini-trailer tub I've designed:




My design calls for crossmembers under the floor running all the way across the tub; the tub mounts to the frame via the crossmembers. The crossmembers will add the necessary stiffness and load-capacity to the tub.


I'm thinking of doing several different sized inner fenders:

- a "tiny" inner fender that's just enough to cover the stock 4.80x12's that come on the higher capacity red trailer.
- a medium inner fender that's large enough to deal with, say, 27" tires.
- a large inner fender that matches up with the wheel openings described by TJ flares, for larger tires (like on my yellow trailer).

For the largest inner fenders, TJ flares would be used. For the smaller two sizes, Pacer Universal flares would be used (if necessary, depending on your trailer's track width, the wheels may be completely inside the tub sides). The Pacer flares come in roughly 50" lengths and can be cut to whatever length needed and bent around the inside of the wheel opening. They resemble CJ/YJ flares:



In kit form, you could get whichever size inner fender you needed for your planned tire size, cut the wheel openings in the side panels to match, and install Pacer flares if necessary.

The way the fiberglass parts are designed, they can either be bolted together, or bonded together with fiberglass. An easy DIY assembly would have everything bolted together, and the floor and crossmembers bolted to the tub. The inner fenders would bolt to the tub and floor as well.

Sounds like you've got it all figured out, and in ways better than I would have come up with (not surprised). I hope you go ahead with this 4' trailer project - I can't wait to see the finished product. I'm sure there's a market for a small water-tight trailer that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. The closest one on the market now that I can think of that is similar in concept is the one made by Tentrax (not as small, and I'm sure nowhere near in price).

http://www.tentrax.com/CargoPactrailer.html
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Unread 08-26-2011, 12:26 PM   #75
jscherb
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2006 LJ Wrangler 
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by armyRN View Post
Sounds like you've got it all figured out, and in ways better than I would have come up with (not surprised). I hope you go ahead with this 4' trailer project - I can't wait to see the finished product. I'm sure there's a market for a small water-tight trailer that doesn't cost an arm and a leg. The closest one on the market now that I can think of that is similar in concept is the one made by Tentrax (not as small, and I'm sure nowhere near in price).

http://www.tentrax.com/CargoPactrailer.html
If this were done as a DIY kit, I think you could get the HF trailer, the fiberglass tub parts, the Gr8Tops tonneau and have a running trailer in the neighborhood of $1000 (not counting shipping).
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