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Unread 08-29-2014, 01:56 PM   #1
derekroth91
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how lifts work

I hear people saying they added these shocks to this lifted vehicle or coil spacers to lift an extra inch on this. Wondering how they work in correlation to each other, if you lift your car what do you exchange? Coils and shocks? When people add spacers to get a greater lift why don't they have to change shocks? Do you have to drop other suspension components like pitman arm? Ive searched the internet and tried using the search tool but can't seem to find a website or thread that accurately describes the answer I'm looking for. I know some things thing made aftermarket when lifting above 4ish inches but I'm wondering more hkw the lift its self work and what exactly a "lift kit" I.e. just coil spacers or new coils altogether or new coils and shocks, coils shocks and perhaps other mods that need to be done when lifting like adj track bar? Appreciate any input or links to sites, threads, videos, that explain this

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Unread 08-29-2014, 02:35 PM   #2
222Doc
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much of what you ask depends on what kind of vehicle intended.

longer shocks meaning more extensional range are longer in the body as well and need space to fit. more bumps stop length so the shock will not become the bump stop. So lift should be in the range of the shocks. if you say put a 2" lift on and have shocks that are in the 12" extensional range you may need bumps stop 3-4" that just dont work as you would be sitting on the bump stops or have very little up travel. exception would be the MC sixpack shocks that have a very small body and a lot of extension.

You need to read up on lifts and why you need track bars and control arms that adjust.
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Unread Yesterday, 12:36 PM   #3
jeepdaddy2000
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A lifts primary role is to raise the body higher. There are a number of ways to do this depending on what suspension you have and why your lifting (IE ground clearence, bigger tires, cooler look, etc..).
Lifts fall into two catagories: body and suspnsion.

Body lifts raise the body off the frame. These only work with older vehicles that do not have intgrated bodies. They are usually extended pucks that go between the frame and the body. These are generally focused on added clearence for tires or asthetics. They are generally inexpensive, but can require shifting components such as fan shrouds, fuel inlets, linkages, and other items that run between the frame and body.

Suspension lifts provide more ground clearance and suspension travel by "pushing" the axles away from the frame using either elliptical or coil springs. These are generally more expensIve due to the engineering involved in getting the springs correct. They may also need extended shocks, brake lines, and breather hoses to accommodate the added distance between the frame and axles. Some small lifts may not require any modifications beyond installation, while larger ones will need drivetrain, steering and tracking upgrades in order to be safe.

Shocks:
Shocks sole purpose is to control oscillation. There are a number of "helper" shocks out there using either air or springs. These are to be avoided since stock shock mounts are not designed to carry vehicle weight. Gas charged shocks can help control body roll but become more inefficient the taller the lift.
Coil springs require stiff shocks due to their nature. Most eliptical springs experience very little oscillation and so should be paired with the softest shock you can use safely.
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Unread Yesterday, 04:02 PM   #4
derekroth91
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So springs/coils are actually lifting the vehicle but longer shocks may be required to help take abuse from bumpy rides?
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Unread Yesterday, 04:36 PM   #5
biffgnar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by derekroth91 View Post
So springs/coils are actually lifting the vehicle but longer shocks may be required to help take abuse from bumpy rides?
Springs set ride height. Shocks control ride comfort from there.
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Unread Yesterday, 07:42 PM   #6
jeepdaddy2000
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Quote:
Originally Posted by derekroth91 View Post
So springs/coils are actually lifting the vehicle but longer shocks may be required to help take abuse from bumpy rides?
Stock shocks are aspecific length in order to work without bottoming or limiting suspensoin travel. If you put a 4" lift under your vehicle, you will need a shock 4" longer than stock in order to keep it the right length.

Shocks come in a multitude of stiffnesses (is that even a word?). Too soft of a shock won't dampen enough leading to wallowing at stops and poor handling. Too stiff a shock will make the ride too harsh and beat on the mounts.
Some are adjustable.
Some are gas charged.
They keep the chassis from bouncing while driving. If your curious as to how they work, try removing yours from the front, then bouncing the corner up and down. If you have coil springs, the front of the rig will continue to bounce after you stop pushing on it. This vertical motion can effect the safety of the vehicle.
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