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NEW JK WRANGLER GRAB BARS NOW at ROCKRIDGE4WDROCKRIDGE4WD Introduces a NEW Jeep Wrangler JK *led* tail Ruffstuff XJ Unirail Channel Reinforcement....

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Unread 03-21-2012, 09:35 AM   #46
nibblesupreme
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundowner View Post
The Saga of The Problematic Rear Shock, Part One


Little-known-fact: If you feed your wheel spacers after midnight, they multiply.



Sweet. How much did you pay for those spacers? I've only seen the spyder trax before..

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Unread 03-21-2012, 09:40 AM   #47
4wdjeepguy
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Looking good man. I wheeled with a guy before that was running the Falkens. Hooked up well on anything rocky but not so well in loose dirt. Can't wait to see how this turns out
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Unread 03-21-2012, 09:45 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nibblesupreme View Post
Sweet. How much did you pay for those spacers? I've only seen the spyder trax before..
I like the SpyderTrax and was going to order them, but they were backordered at the time and I was going to have to pay a lot of shipping to get them from the one place that had them in stock. That wasn't acceptable, so I got these for $85 a set, with free shipping. I did some checking around, and basically, you're looking for a short list of qualities in your spacers:
- No more than 1.5" width.
- 6061 Aluminum.
- Hub-centric.
- Grade 8 studs.

I'm of the camp that says "a spacer is a spacer" so if you can save a bit of money here, I see no problem in doing so. If the spacer meets the above criteria and is properly installed with threadlocker and the appropriate torque, you'll be good to go.

More information about these will be coming in a future installment.

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Originally Posted by unlrubicon05 View Post
Looking good man. I wheeled with a guy before that was running the Falkens. Hooked up well on anything rocky but not so well in loose dirt. Can't wait to see how this turns out
Thank you for the compliment! I've actually had these in loose dirt and gravel already, and they were spectacular. Deep mud is the downfall...but I truly hate being in the mud so I stay out of it. Rocks...haven't gotten there yet. But we'll see. Tire reviews are on the way as well...including some excerpts from e-mails back and forth with Falken.
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Unread 03-21-2012, 09:51 AM   #49
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Unread 03-21-2012, 09:56 AM   #50
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Originally Posted by Sundowner View Post
I

You mean to say that your interest was piqued...not peaked. And flamethrowers are interesting devices, no doubt. I think we've all ignited a stream of something that comes from an aerosol can at least once or twice in our lives. However, if you really want to build a flamethrower, keep the following points in mind:

- All of the plumbing HAS to be leak-proof. You're standing in a furnace when you carry one of these things.
- You need a high-pressure three-tank system: twin fuel tanks and a central pressure unit. This keeps the tanks balanced on your back.
- Diesel or jellied gasoline for the fuel, nitrogen for the pressure gas, and a magnesium flare for the ignition. These are your cheapest options, because flamethrowers can be relatively expensive to operate.
- You'll have better results if you saturate an area with unlit fuel, and then hit it with a short, ignited blast. This prevents you from suffering the heat blast off of the flamethrower to the greatest possible degree, and also prevents a huge amount of fuel burning on the way to the target.
- They're highly illegal to possess without the proper paperwork and/or tax stamps. Act accordingly.
Thanks I learned a couple of new things today.

1. Peaked does not = Piqued

2. The government is "ok" with me having a flame thrower as long as I pay them money.

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Unread 03-21-2012, 10:31 AM   #51
Sundowner
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Originally Posted by MattGATRTJ View Post
The government is "ok" with me having a flame thrower as long as I pay them money.
I have found - over time - that this is the case with a great many things. Technically, I can buy myself a vintage Messerschmitt and put four Rheinmetall-Borsig MK108's in the nose. All it takes is money and the right pieces of paper. Honestly, I'm not sure if there is further licensing on the flamethrower because of the "destructive device" portions of the law, but even if so, there are ways around it.
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Unread 03-21-2012, 02:32 PM   #52
redrelyt12
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Originally Posted by Sundowner View Post
That wasn't acceptable, so I got these for $85 a set, with free shipping.
Where exactly did you order the spacers from?
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Unread 03-21-2012, 02:38 PM   #53
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so is there a current full body shot? of the jeep of course.
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Unread 03-21-2012, 05:02 PM   #54
Sundowner
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Originally Posted by redrelyt12 View Post
Where exactly did you order the spacers from?
Amazon, through a Prime Account. The 11301 spacers have increased to $98 as of the time of this writing, though. You can now get them cheaper elsewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yjoe View Post
so is there a current full body shot? of the jeep of course.
Yes, that's coming at the end of the suspension write up.
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Unread 03-21-2012, 07:11 PM   #55
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In which Greta gets a bit of a lift...

Contrary to popular myth and legend, there's nothing mysterious about the workings and movement of a Jeep suspension. They're actually very simple, and the more time you spend staring at one the simpler they get. My best advice to anyone that's contemplating any sort of suspension modification is to go ahead and climb under there and get familiar with all the parts and pieces.

Here's a view of the stock rear suspension, with nothing more than a 2" coil spacer installed. You can clearly see here that the only solid linkage that limits the downward travel of the axle is the shock. You can also see that on the stock suspension, the shock is sitting at - shall we say - a less-than-ideal angle. However, it's worth noting that in the 2" range of lift the coils are not so bowed as to necessitate moving the spring perch. Keep in mind that when you begin to drop an axle, you have brake lines and - in my case - air lines and sensor wiring that are all connected to hard points on frame or body. Be sure that you're leaving enough slack in these lines when you push the axle downwards (yes, I said push...keep reading).




Here's a view of the rear, disassembled: notice that the sway bar is disconnected and the shock is totally removed. If you look just beneath the cover of the rear differential, you'll see the lower part of the secret to easily pulling out your springs: a bottle jack.




Valuable Information: To easily remove a rear spring without bothering yourself with spring compressors, pull both shocks and allow the axle to move as far down as it can, freely. Place a bottle jack under one side of the vehicle and begin to jack that portion of the axle upwards: you will see the opposite side begin to drop in relatively proportional fashion. When you see the opposite side cease dropping in relation to the jacking, stop. Go to the dropped side and push gently down on the brake rotor while applying force to the bottom of the spring. The spring should quickly pop out of place, and can thus be removed.

Removing the springs is easy, as is replacing them. While you've got the spring out, remove the rear bumpstops. You want them out of the way when you go to install the new spring...and you actually put the spring in before the bumpstops and bumpstop extensions. Yes, you read that correctly.

By far, the worst part of the rear suspension is the upper bar pin bolts...specifically, the one that's sandwiched between the shock body and the frame. Here's a tip: don't remove it. Take the opposite bolt completely out with an impact wrench and a long extension, and then only loosen the frame-side bolt enough to slide the ear of the shock's bar pin free The new shock then installs in reverse: one ear of the bar pin is slipped over the still-present frame-side bolt...




...and the inner bolt is installed and tightened. These bolts are best handled by a standard-depth 13mm socket: a six-point will hold it more securely than a twelve-point. After the inner bolt is tightened the shock can be gently pushed away from the frame to make room for the socket and extension. The tightening of the inner bolt is shown below. After you have everything in place, all the fasteners can be torqued to spec.




Valuable Information: The rear bumpstops and extensions will actually slide in through the coils of the rear springs, and everything can be both assembled and tightened up inside the spring itself after the spring is installed and properly seated. You leave the bumpstops and extensions out when you install the spring because - this way - you can keep them out of the way when you go to shove the spring in place. It makes the job just that much easier.

If you don't know how to figure a proper bumpstop length, read this thread:

http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f9/bu...points-734737/


We actually re-installed an old-and-busted shock and pulled the new spring back out just to see how the bumpstops would change as a result of the old and new shock lengths...because you can't cycle a suspension with a spring in place. OME's provided unit is close enough to work so we went ahead and installed it. Here's Anna doing exactly that, right before we pulled the old shock and re-installed the new one.




Once this is done on both sides the rear can be buttoned up. Here's a shot (yes, it's a repeat) of one side of the finished rear suspension, including some newly-applied company insignia.




And another view. Here, you can clearly see the effect that extreme articulation has on suspension geometry...the upper jounce bumper is actually pointing somewhere behind the lower rear spring pad! Teaser: after all the driveline changes are done and the proper geometry is established, the rear coils will be relocated and the shocks outboarded. that will improve the rear suspension's movement and stability both on- and off-road.



Next up...the front!
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Unread 03-21-2012, 08:04 PM   #56
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The front suspension is a bit more involved, but it's much of the same process as the rear. The key differences are that you don't have quite as much movement, and you can't use the same "install the jounce bumpers after the spring is in" trick. This means that you need spring compressors. You won't have to compress the spring much, but the job is much easier when - again - you have the proper tools. If you plan on pulling and installing the front springs more than once or twice, go ahead and get a set for your garage toolbox. Decent ones can be had for $50 or so. If you want to rent, go to your local auto parts store. Just get them ahead of time so you have them on hand when you need them.

The stock front.




See that front caliper? That thing is about to seriously F*** ME OVER about six days from the time that picture was taken. But I digress. Once the spring and shock are out, you can remove the coil spacer from the upper spring perch.




Once the spacer is out of the way and the new spring is ready to slide into place, you get a very clear view of the reason that you're going to need the spring compressors: no working room. Here's a shot of the compressors themselves in action, about ten seconds before the new spring popped into place.




As you can see, the upper jounce bumpers and extensions are MUCH longer than the ones in the rear, and the coils of the front spring are much smaller. This equates into having to loosely install the extensions, cups and foamy bumpers, and then slide the spring into place. The only thing missing here are the bumpers. These just get thrown down inside the coil of the spring and then are gingerly worked into place after the coil is seated. After the new spring is in place, you can remove the compressors and tighten up the bumpstop hardware.

Valuable Information: Installing the front spring is a two person job because - as stated - the front suspension does not leave you as much working room as the rear. To remove the stock front springs, follow the same procedure as was detailed in the rear, with the following exception: have someone physically stand on the rotor while you lever the spring out. Once the old spring is out, loosely install the extensions, cups and foamy bumpers: these are left loose because they will allow you a bit more room in working the new, taller spring into place. Since the new spring is taller you'll find that you will compress it to almost the exact same height as the old stock springs. Once the spring is seated, the bumpstop extensions and cups can be tightened down by a socket and ratchet thrust through the coils, and the bumpstops themselves can be installed: using a ratchet handle to lever them home is easiest.

The completed left front, right before the right spring (visible on the ground) was popped into place and the sway bars were bolted back up.




After this, it's a just a matter of installing the long-neglected wheel spacers and getting those seemingly-still-too-large 35" Falkens shoved underneath the fenders. The spacers slide right over the studs...




...and the studs get a dab of blue threadlocker.




In case you wonder why I keep mentioning torque specs, it's because of situations like this one: overly-tight or overly-loose fasteners in places like these can have LETHAL consequences. Crack a wheel stud or two, and you can lose a wheel in short order at 65 miles per hour. Surviving that kind of catastrophe requires that you have a direct blood relation to Jesus, or someone else with a lot of swat. So if you don't have those genetics, read your instructions and follow your torque specs! Taking into account the threadlocker, I torqued these to 86 lb-ft. and was ready to grab a tire or two.

You know what picture is coming next, don't you?

At this point, I got so excited that I just put the camera on a shelf and got down to the long-awaited business of shoving a set of 35" tires under my Jeep...and when I say "long awaited" I'm not kidding. Fifteen years ago I did my first lift install: it was a friend's YJ, and we threw a 4" lift on it and a 1" body lift to clear a set of 35" BFG's. Since the minute that his Jeep came off the jack stands, I knew I wanted to one day have a Jeep that had a good-sized set of tires under her...I just fell in love with the look from that minute forwards.

So, there aren't any "here's me putting the tire on" pictures, or "here's how to tighten a lugnut" pictures.

There's just this one that we took in the midst of my maniacally satisfied laughter.




Oh.

F***.

Yes.





Two days later I started re-torquing fasteners, and decided to snap another quick shot of her sitting outside.




That's fifteen years of waiting coming to an end, my friends. I sat back and enjoyed a way-too-early-in-the-day beer. No vibrations, no serious tire shimmies, no driveline issues at all. The springs and shocks were in and the body lift and motor mount lift were perfect. Those long-awaited 35's were sitting just beautifully under the fenders...and for the first time, I truly understood that the real work was just beginning.

I smiled and had another beer.
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Unread 03-21-2012, 09:12 PM   #57
bobthetj03
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Look at that puney little spare tire sitting back there all lonely and insignificant, LOL! Very Nice! Sit back and bask in your accomplishment! Enjoy those beers, there will be many more needed!
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Unread 03-21-2012, 10:04 PM   #58
cycleguy04
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Why is that I am thoroughly interested in what you are saying about your mods, but every time a picture of Anna pops up I lose all interest...

Subscribed!

I'm going to build my TJ in a very similar way. Tummy tuck, MML, 35's, 4.88's, manual lockers front and rear, SYE, double cardan shaft, Ford 8.8 rear, Superior axle kits front and rear. Sound familiar?

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Unread 03-21-2012, 10:04 PM   #59
Sundowner
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobthetj03 View Post
Look at that puney little spare tire sitting back there all lonely and insignificant, LOL!
I know, I know...and it was well on the way to being gone, until a braking problem cropped up. So the spare and carrier are now on hold...had to make a phone call to mrblaine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cycleguy04 View Post
Why is that I am thoroughly interested in what you are saying about your mods, but every time a picture of Anna pops up I lose all interest...
Try working around her.

Quote:
Originally Posted by cycleguy04 View Post
I'm going to build my TJ in a very similar way. Tummy tuck, MML, 35's, 4.88's, manual lockers front and rear, SYE, double cardan shaft, Ford 8.8 rear, Superior axle kits front and rear. Sound familiar?
Sounds like a winner to me.
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Unread 03-21-2012, 10:13 PM   #60
cycleguy04
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundowner View Post
Try working around her.
I wouldn't get anything done...
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[COLOR="Black"][FONT="Showcard Gothic"]'98 Wrangler Sahara - SOLD[/COLOR]

[COLOR="White"]'91 Ranger XLT 2WD - 4.0 V6, A4"hell"D, contemplating twin turbo 5.3[/COLOR]

[COLOR="Red"]'79 C10 Big Ten 2WD - 350, TH350, contemplating rebuilding to 355ci with supercharger and programmable EFI[/COLOR]

[COLOR="RoyalBlue"]'12 Subaru Forester (AKA: Arctic Cat) - 2.5, non-CVT, wife's, still begging her to let me get an exhaust system[/FONT][/COLOR]

[FONT="Showcard Gothic"][COLOR="Blue"]'01 SV650 - snorkelectomy, ebay slip-on, cam swap and re-jet in the near future [/COLOR][/FONT]
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