bad drivetrain bearing, please help identify - JeepForum.com

 
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post #1 of 2 Old 09-30-2013, 11:39 AM Thread Starter
foxman97
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bad drivetrain bearing, please help identify

just bought an car from a friend. he replaced the clutch a while ago (2 years?) with an act stage 2, he claims he replaced the throwout bearing however it is one of my suspect bearings. I would estimate that the car has about 300 miles on it since the clutch was changed. the noise is distinct almost sounds like drilling through steel at a slow speed, it's a growl and not high pitched. I can hear it while in neutral with the clutch engaged (pedal out), but goes away when the clutch his disengaged (pedal pressed). I can also hear it when the car is in motion whether the clutch is engaged or not, unless both the trans is in neutral and the clutch is disengaged (pedal pushed in) while rolling. I have read and been told multiple things but have yet to receive a clear answer. my suspect bearings are, the throwout/release bearing(main suspect), and the trans input shaft bearing. any help is appreciated.


Quote:
Originally Posted by BlackDaddyZJ View Post
in all of that i dont hear no, which by my logic and calculations actually means yes:2thumbsup:
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post #2 of 2 Old 10-03-2013, 07:20 PM
laybackman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foxman97 View Post
just bought an car from a friend. he replaced the clutch a while ago (2 years?) with an act stage 2, he claims he replaced the throwout bearing however it is one of my suspect bearings. I would estimate that the car has about 300 miles on it since the clutch was changed. the noise is distinct almost sounds like drilling through steel at a slow speed, it's a growl and not high pitched. I can hear it while in neutral with the clutch engaged (pedal out), but goes away when the clutch his disengaged (pedal pressed). I can also hear it when the car is in motion whether the clutch is engaged or not, unless both the trans is in neutral and the clutch is disengaged (pedal pushed in) while rolling. I have read and been told multiple things but have yet to receive a clear answer. my suspect bearings are, the throwout/release bearing(main suspect), and the trans input shaft bearing. any help is appreciated.
Not a trans pro but if the noise was from the input shaft I think the noise would never go away. I would venture to say the TO bearing is the noise maker.

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input shaft , throwout bearing , transmission

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