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Unread 05-13-2012, 10:03 PM   #16
Vin
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Originally Posted by xlTravislx
Thanks for the help everyone.

I might try it out for a few months to get my own opinion. As long as it wont do damage. This has been on my mind for the past year.
The biggest difference I've noticed is when they switch from summer to winter blend.

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Unread 05-14-2012, 06:12 AM   #17
paul84043
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In my experience just changing the fuel type one day is a bad idea, it will give your Jeep digestive problems and probably cause diarrhea. I would slowly mix it's food so that the change it not noticeable, it will be much happier and your carpet will thank you.
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Unread 05-14-2012, 06:47 AM   #18
bogleparsons
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If you ever noticed gas stations have 2 tanks (or 3 if they have Diesel) One is regular and one is premium, they mix the two to get midgrade
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Unread 05-14-2012, 10:19 AM   #19
vadslram
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Originally Posted by cyberpyrot View Post
Ever wonder why you only see one gas truck at the gas station? Maybe the gas truck has 3 compartments.. Hmmm its a conspericy i tell you.
Tank trucks have 3 or 4 compartments depending on the truck. each one seperated completely. Sunoco used to use two( 93 and 87) and then blend for the octanes between.
On a newer car you could get some benefit because the knock sensor will dial back the timing for lower octane gas but on TJs and before the only benefit you will get is a little more detergent in the premium.
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Unread 05-15-2012, 04:10 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by bogleparsons View Post
If you ever noticed gas stations have 2 tanks (or 3 if they have Diesel) One is regular and one is premium, they mix the two to get midgrade
haha, this is what my brother does when he fills his JK - calls it a 'cocktail'.
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Unread 05-15-2012, 09:19 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by bogleparsons View Post
If you ever noticed gas stations have 2 tanks (or 3 if they have Diesel) One is regular and one is premium, they mix the two to get midgrade
That's great that you pointed that out... Just last night I was gassing up my truck (Hemi uses 89) and I watched (and recorded) the tickers on the pump. There were 3, I assumed for 87, 89, and 93. The first two would alternate ticks as I gassed up. Still wonder though, how the pluming would be done to have 3 tickers and 2 tanks. I would've thought 2, one for 87, one for 93, then they would alternate back & forth???
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Unread 05-17-2012, 08:20 AM   #22
Robert_Beers
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As others have stated, unless your Jeep's engine experiences knocking, there is no reason to run anything higher than 87 octane. Any decent gasoline is going to have adequate levels of detergent in it, and you can always dump a small bottle of injector cleaner in once a year if you're that concerned about build up. It's a lot cheaper than running premium.
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Unread 05-20-2012, 10:27 AM   #23
xlTravislx
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Well I tried it for my self. I did about 7 gallons of premium mixed with the 2-3 regular that was left over.

I did notice a difference in the way my jeep drove. It seemed like it revved up faster.

Problem: I did get a little above average on my temperature gauge after driving about 65 (speedo/odo don't work) for 30 minutes.
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Unread 05-20-2012, 11:42 AM   #24
MayRoll
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Originally Posted by xlTravislx
Well I tried it for my self. I did about 7 gallons of premium mixed with the 2-3 regular that was left over.

I did notice a difference in the way my jeep drove. It seemed like it revved up faster.
Classic placebo effect.
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Unread 05-20-2012, 06:25 PM   #25
Axl Jack
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It seems like this topic comes up every so often on the boards, so after retyping it repeatedly I decided to save it on my computer and copy + paste whenever necessary. This is originally my response to somebody on the boards a few years ago who vehemently defended his stance that using higher octane fuel was good for his engine. What I've found over the years is that people who have been using high octane fuel in their regular cars are the ones who defend their stance the loudest when provided with evidence to the contrary. I get it.... Nobody wants to admit what they were doing for YEARS was wrong (plus the added embarassment of having been throwing away money as well). I am not a fuel engineer. I am a high school chemistry teacher. So take that at face value.

So here we go:

The octane rating of gasoline tells you how much the fuel can be compressed before it spontaneously ignites. The higher the octane number, the more energy it takes to ignite the gas. Technically, an octane rating measures the proportion of isooctane to heptane in a fuel. But as a practical matter, a fuel's octane rating relates to how much energy it takes to ignite that fuel. When gas ignites by compression rather than because of the spark from the spark plug, it causes knocking in the engine. Lower-octane gas can handle the least amount of compression before igniting. The compression ratio of your engine determines the octane rating of the gas you must use in the car, which is why we should really follow the advice of the engineers who designed our engines. If it says use 87 octane, then use 87. You're not doing your engine any good by using what you perceive to be "better" fuel.

Unless your car is explicitly designed to run on high octane gas, using a high octane gas will NOT give your car better mileage NOR will it give it more power. That's because, once again, the rating refers to how much energy it takes to ignite the gas, not directly to how much energy the gas puts out.

Of course, with anything, there are exceptions to the rule. One exception is with engines designed for high octane gas. In that case, using high octane gas WILL improve performance and mileage. The reason has to do with the compression and ignition timing characteristics of the engine. Those specially designed engines will only perform efficiently with higher octane gas.

The second exception is if your car has a lot of engine knocking or pinging. This is a sign that the gas is not igniting when it should (i.e. the timing could be off). This reduces the power and efficiency of the engine. In this case, use a higher octane gas and see if it helps. (And by higher, I mean 89 and not 92.)

In conclusion, in most cases, there is no reason to use and pay for expensive high octane gas. So please don't waste your money. You're actually harming the durability of your engine over its lifetime if you use higher octane fuel and your vehicle doesn't explicitly call for it.
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Unread 05-22-2012, 06:15 AM   #26
xlTravislx
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Originally Posted by Axl Jack View Post
The second exception is if your car has a lot of engine knocking or pinging. This is a sign that the gas is not igniting when it should (i.e. the timing could be off). This reduces the power and efficiency of the engine. In this case, use a higher octane gas and see if it helps. (And by higher, I mean 89 and not 92.)
I think I fall into this category.
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