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abajoczky 11-20-2013 09:13 PM

Tire Recappers in Nashville, TN
 
I see plenty of discussion about Treadwright, but I haven't seen any discussion here about Tire Recappers in Nashville. I need some tires on the CHEAP for my newly lifted Commander and stumbled on a set of 4 Tire Repcappers Cross Grip M/T for $380. It's a KM2 looking tread pattern. Does anybody have any experience with them?

drexelsteve 11-24-2013 06:20 PM

I stumbled upon them last night. I definitely like the km2 style tread pattern. I can find nothing about them online, though. You ought to buy a set and let everyone know how try are.

abajoczky 11-25-2013 07:07 AM

Yeah, I was tempted to just try them out but was a little hesitant on a retread with no prior experiences for my DD. Maybe somebody from here did try them out, because I went back to the ebay listing the next morning after posting this thread and they were sold. I did find a thread on a Land Rover forum and there were some very mixed feelings about them.

I ended up buying a set of used Duratracs off Craigslist for $120. They'll take me well into next year, but after I recoup my moving expenses I'll figure something out about tires. These may be back on the list to try.

Miker1529 03-14-2014 08:26 AM

I have a set from tirerecappers
 
I ordered a set of there mega mud 205/65r15s about three weeks ago to go on my 1989 dodge dakota . It was 344 shipped. They got here lighting fast with there free shipping deal ( I got 4 so the shipped them for free) they shipped them with fedex tags on each tire so no fright to worry about. I love how the tread is wearing. My mistake was taking them to a use tire place to mount them the balance was great until some fell off the guys who mounted mine ( not tirerecappers ) reused old weights. So when they were balanced the road noise at 70 mph was as normal as my firestone m/ts . They did give me four diffent brand cores which does not bother me. The edge where the cap ends and the old tire is shows some buff lines but it is not bad. It is a recap that is to be expected. I did call them before I ordered them they answered the phone with no hold time (awesome ) . I will be ordering a set of hwy tires from them for my van soon. To put it short it was a great deal good product fast ship great customer service. Just get them mounted at a off-road shop . I'm at eastern now getting them balanced right.

mschi772 03-14-2014 07:04 PM

Don't be afraid of retreads. They're not actually any more dangerous than new tires assuming they're of proper quality. I know nothing about Tire Recappers, but Treadwrights go above and beyond--they're at least as safe as new tires. Most tire failures whether new or retreaded are due to improper care--inappropriate tire pressure, bad alignment, bad balance, lack of rotation...

I'd take Treadwright over these guys based on what I see, but they don't have a KM2 clone, and if you really love the KM2, go for it--much better than paying 2-3x more just for the BFG name on the side (which is possible you'd get anyway if the tread is mounted on BFG carcasses).

Quote:

Originally Posted by mschi772 (Post 19697105)
Retreads are not the devil, and Treadwrights are exceptional retreads. They were exceptional retreads before they had their bead-to-bead rubber tech, and now they're even better. All tires can fail. When a new tire fails, people usually dismiss it more easily as a freak occurence, but when a retread fails, their misconceptions/prejudices lead them to blame the retreading without a second thought. Treadwright's failure rate is comparable to if not better than other "regular" tire manufacturers.

The misconception that retreads are dangerous comes from a variety of factors especially those somewhat unique to the trucking industry. Even in the trucking industry, retreads are not inherently more dangerous than new tires. Source: http://www.wsdot.wa.gov/NR/rdonlyres...thesis9309.pdf

Here is the conclusion section of the study. If you have questions/criticisms, they're likely addressed earlier in the study, so I suggest reading through it because it is extremely thorough. I understand that reading scientific papers can be boring if not difficult to the point of impenetrable for many people; I am a scientist and had to learn not only how to read but also how to author this kind of literature years ago, so I'll do my best to answer questions if anyone has them.
Quote:

Misunderstandings by the typical road user have incorrectly attributed the nature, extent, and contributing factors precipitating the formation of the roadside alligator. In clarifying this issue, several tire debris studies conducted since 1990 have sought to determine the probable cause of tire failure and to validate or disprove whether a commercial medium- or wide-base truck tire’s retread status is also a contributing factor. The TDS was one of such studies. Executed during summer 2007, this survey involved the collection of 85,000 pounds of rubber that provided approximately 1,500 truck tire samples for subsequent failure analysis.

The TDS results suggest that the proportions of commercial medium tire debris collected according to adjusted VMT shares may not be significantly overrepresented if localized traffic flow characteristics are taken into account. Indeed, the OE versus retread proportions of the collected tire debris broadly correlated with accepted industry expectations. There was a strong similarity between casings and tire fragments with respect to probable damage/failure cause where the OE/retread status was known. In these cases, road hazard or maintenance/operational reasons were two of the top three probable damage/failure causes. The importance of this result suggests that the majority of tire debris items found on the nation’s highways is not a result of manufacturing/process deficiencies. Indeed, similar findings are corroborated in earlier studies of tire debris that also prove the direct link between deficient tire maintenance and inflation pressures and premature tire failure.

U.S. trucking industry practices have strongly influenced the OE/retread tire mix on the typical 18-wheeler tractor-trailer combination (described in paragraphs #1 (page 9) and #4 (page 10)). Insulation of the driver’s cab from the steer/drive versus trailer axle tires has also contributed to the extent that a failure in any tire may go unnoticed by the driver while the vehicle is in operation (discussed in paragraph #4 (page #10)). These two factors, we believe, suggest that the retread tire fragments tested were not overrepresented in the debris items collected. With respect to the tire and truck fleet industry stakeholders, there is the possibility that the TDS results confirm accepted beliefs. In any given location roadside alligators often represent tire debris from all vehicle types as inadequate tire inflation pressure has the potential to precipitate tire failure for all types of tire (i.e., OE and retread) and not just the commercial medium. However, two primary challenges remain: firstly increasing public awareness about the origins, characteristics, and impacts of tire debris, and, secondly, ensuring adherence to the highest standards in commercial driver truck operations and associated tire maintenance. Resolving these challenges has the potential to see a significant reduction in roadside tire debris, correct the understanding of all highway users regarding the origins of the roadside alligator and sustain the attention of all vehicle operators about the importance of maintaining correct tire inflation pressures.
TRB


strvger01 03-14-2014 07:43 PM

i buy Treadwright tires. main thing is they always use matching casings when you buy sets of their tires. my current ones are on Michelin casings. the other thing is they don't really recap tires, they remold them completely. in their process, the tires also are balanced before they are shipped out. set i have now i got just last summer. the ones they replaced i got from Treadwright over 5 years and 50k miles ago. they work for me.

Scrmngchicken 03-15-2014 10:24 AM

I don't know enough about them to say yes or no. Personally I don't see why, as I am sure you can find same quality new tires for the same cost as retreads. And I'd take new over retreads any day.

mschi772 03-15-2014 11:43 AM

Retreads are almost always cheaper than their clone or similar counterparts. If you find a new tire with the tread you want/need, go for it, but with all other hints being equal, retreads should have better prices.

Retreads are also more environmentally friendly as you're recycling/reusing instead of making whole new tires (very dirty) and disposing of them all the time.

Sent from my phone

Scrmngchicken 03-15-2014 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mschi772 (Post 21263801)
Retreads are almost always cheaper than their clone or similar counterparts. If you find a new tire with the tread you want/need, go for it, but with all other hints being equal, retreads should have better prices.

Retreads are also more environmentally friendly as you're recycling/reusing instead of making whole new tires (very dirty) and disposing of them all the time.

Sent from my phone

Can't argue your first. Makes sense.

The second part depends on the state. Here in North Carolina, tires don't just sit around in a landfill. Companies like Central Carolina Holdings recycles or repurposes old tires into different things. Mulch, playground equipment, etc, is usually what old tires end up as.

mschi772 03-15-2014 01:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Scrmngchicken
Can't argue your first. Makes sense. The second part depends on the state. Here in North Carolina, tires don't just sit around in a landfill. Companies like Central Carolina Holdings recycles or repurposes old tires into different things. Mulch, playground equipment, etc, is usually what old tires end up as.

True, I've seen better use of old tire rubber than in the past, but chopping a tire up into playground padding or whatever still means a new carcass has to be made to replace it whereas a retread reuses that carcass for at least one more lifecycle--a whole new tire doesn't need to be manufactured. Tire manufacturing is actually what I was getting at as the polluter, not tires in landfills (though that does happen and is bad).

Sent from my phone

Scrmngchicken 03-15-2014 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mschi772 (Post 21266169)
True, I've seen better use of old tire rubber than in the past, but chopping a tire up into playground padding or whatever still means a new carcass has to be made to replace it whereas a retread reuses that carcass for at least one more lifecycle--a whole new tire doesn't need to be manufactured. Tire manufacturing is actually what I was getting at as the polluter, not tires in landfills (though that does happen and is bad).

Sent from my phone

Depends. Tire companies are getting better at reducing their pollution by using more natural substances and creating compounds that last longer and have lower rolling resistance.

Two years ago I was invited by Yokohama to tour their plant in Salem, Va. It was a 12 hour endeavor. Half was speaking with the designers and chemists and the other was watching and conversating with the builders themselves. And what I got out most was that tires of 10 years ago are nothing in comparison to today's tires.

Yokohama uses an average 195 different parts in an average tire. This ranges from rubber types to different metals and fibers. The major problem with tires is not all of these materials will stick to each other. The butyl liner that acts as an integrated innner tube won't stick to the underlying rubber components. It has to be "smoked" in. Insanely high temperatures. And this is before the final cure.

I know what is involved with making a carcass. What I don't know is the strip and recure procedures when it comes to remanufacturing a retread. I have seen the processes with AG and heavy truck tires. But those carcasses were designed and manufactured new with the intent on retread later in life. Passenger and light truck tires (with the exception of the Michelin XPS Rib and Traction) are not.

Miker1529 03-19-2014 09:37 PM

Update after about 600 more miles on my set of mega mud recapped tires from tire recappers of Nash.since the rebalance. They ride great. I will try to post pics . Soon.


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