Not your average "Who makes the best AT?" thread. This is an above average one! - Page 3 - JeepForum.com
Search  
Sign Up   Today's Posts
User: Pass: Remember?
Advertise Here
Jeep Home Jeep Forum Jeep Classifieds Jeep Registry JeepSpace Jeep Reviews Jeep Gallery Jeep Clubs Jeep Groups Jeep Videos Jeep Events Jeep Articles
Go Back JeepForum.com > General Technical Discussions > Tires & Wheels > Not your average "Who makes the best AT?" thread. This is an above average one!

RIGID LED Light Blowout Sale - All Sizes, All Series, all Introducing MONSTALINER™ UV Permanent DIY Roll On Bed LineJeep Wrangler Bushwacker Flat Fender Flare Sale at Baselin

Reply
Unread 05-29-2013, 03:26 PM   #31
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
P.S. - I think I've done a fair job of explaining when I'm talking reviews vs first hand experience, or sometimes a combination of both, but I could probably do better.

I'll try to be more specific in future.

Also, I do appreciate you Mschi. You are helpful to others, including myself, and you introduced me to Firestone Destination AT, which is on of the great ATs.

I have also appreciated your help on other topics.

__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 05-29-2013, 03:40 PM   #32
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
Part of my country cousin's mile long rural driveway...

Here is something interesting about the Cooper AT3 I'm using on my XJ.

They can drive up a hard packed slick wet muddy STEEP road in 2wd without even spinning at all. Open diff.

My cousin has Toyo MT on his truck. Even when they were new, he could NOT drive up it in 2wd, but could easily drive up it in 4wd. Open diff. Now his tires are worn and slip and spin even in 4wd. Open diffs.

My Buick Park Ave (front wheel drive with limited slip) with Hankook i-Pike Winter tires (looks like AT tread) can drive up it with difficulty (both front tires spinning, but getting er done).

The Grabber AT2 I had on my XJ could drive up it in 2wd, but with some wheel slip. i.e. - some difficulty in 2wd, but did it. Open diff.

The BFG AT I used to have on my prior XJ and my prior LJ could NOT drive up in 2wd, even when tires brand new. The BFG AT were good all around tires, but not very good on mud. Open diffs.

Those are all first hand experiences with me driving, except my cousin's pickup truck, which he was driving, but I was with him.

I have not tried Grabber AT2 or Cooper AT3 in deeper mud, but reviews by users and one 4x4 mag say they do well (for AT) in 6" to 12" of mud. Someday I'll try the Cooper AT3 in deeper mud.

---

The rest of his STEEP CURVEY driveway is gravel on the shared with neighbors part, and one section is paved with jagged baseball size rocks.

---

It's even more fun in Winter with snow and-or ice. He's in foot hills of Cascade mountains.

The earlier Cooper AT, BFG AT, General Grabber AT2, and Hankook i-Pike all did really well on Winter road conditions, including ice, packed snow, and deep snow (within limitations of ground clearance). My cousin likes his Toyo MT just fine, but he say they aren't very good on packed snow or ice.

The Winter road conditions I've had to deal with aren't limited to his mile long driveway. Just getting to his driveway is a Winter adventure.

Though this time of year the challenge is the steep muddy section of his driveway. It,s a very wet climate.

---

One thing I did NOT like about my BFG AT was they hydroplaned a lot on wet freeways. In heavy heavy down pours (common here) they hydroplaned easily and often at speeds above 60 mph.

My General Grabber AT2 and Cooper AT3 have never hydroplaned. Not even a little. Not even at 70 mph in a heavy down pour.

My Hankook Winter i-Pike don't hydroplane much, but the do hydroplane a little at 70 mph in a heavy down pour.

My cousin says his Toyo MT don't hydroplane, but of course we'd expect that from open MT tread.

---

One thing I did like about General Grabber AT2 is it was the largest 30 x 9.5 R15 tire I've ever seen. It was tall and wide for a 30" tire. I also liked its slightly aggressive look. What I did not like was the harsh ride and it seemed to have a high rolling resistance. The Grabber AT2 was reasonably quiet for AT. Slightly less noise than BFG AT, IMO.

By contrast, the Cooper AT3 rides noticeably softer, doesn't look as aggressive (but it performs as well off road), is a lot more civilized on road (softer ride, better high speed steering, very quiet, noticeably less rolling resistance, better gas mileage). Cooper AT3 is IME better than BFG AT and Grabber AT2.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 05-29-2013, 05:53 PM   #33
mschi772
Registered User
1997 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 2,361
To be clear, I wasn't implying that your back prevents experience or eliminates prior experience. I only knew you had a back injury that has some amount of influence over you and your vehicle and was unclear about what your experience is vs what may simply be data you've compiled from other sources. They're both helpful, but it's handy to know which is which.
__________________
Might trade rebuilt 231 for new/rebuilt 242. Contact me.

New sig rules suck.
mschi772 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 05-31-2013, 02:57 PM   #34
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschi772 View Post
To be clear, I wasn't implying that your back prevents experience or eliminates prior experience. I only knew you had a back injury that has some amount of influence over you and your vehicle and was unclear about what your experience is vs what may simply be data you've compiled from other sources. They're both helpful, but it's handy to know which is which.
That's reasonable. OK. Points taken. I apologize for getting testy.

I'm sensitive on the topic of me being handicapped, but you would be too if you'd had the experiences I've had.
A local restaurant asked me not to come there any more. Their reason? The manager said I'm to handicapped (my knees). Besides being really s****y, that was a civil rights violation. Yes, that really happened to me. Also, I am occasionally targeted by thugs who shout biggeted things about me being handicapped while they phyically threaten me with bodily harm. Sometimes people (including the occasional cop) talk to me like I am mentally retarded. I'm physically handicapped, NOT mentally handicapped! I'm probably smarter than they are.
So ya, I'm sensitive and defensive about being physically handicapped, but who wouldn't be? Sorry I over reacted.

---

Due to my back problems I do place a higher priority on ride quality. So when I say the Cooper AT3 and BFG AT ride exceptionally nice (and soft) for AT load C, you know it's a good ride quality.

When I say the General Grabber AT2 rides miserably harsh, it's fair to say part of my gripes about that are because of my bad back. However, some healthy people say it rides exceptionally rough for an AT load C. A person with a healthy spine might not care about rough ride, but these tires ride so rough it interfered with steering when I hit bumps at high speeds, especially on curvy highway. So I don't recommend them. That's to bad because in most other ways I liked them.

To date, the ATs I like best based on personal experience are: Cooper AT3 is my favorite. BFG AT is my second favorite. My only complaint is the BFG AT hydroplanes to easy on wet highway and gets stuck to easy on mud (even mild mud).

The ATs I like best based on reviews are: Cooper Discoverer AT3 and Hankook Dynapro ATM for all climates, but especially for wet and Winter slick climates, and they have some mud ability too. I also like Firestone Destination AT for all climates, but reviews make it clear that it doesn't have much mud ability.

I think the Toyo Open Country AT2 (P and LT versions) will prove itself to be one of the great ATs. There aren't yet enough reviews because it's new, but I think it will prove itsself during the next year.

I think the Nokian Rotiva AT will prove itself to be on of the great ATs, especially for Winter use. There aren't yet enough reviews because it's new, but I think it will prove itsself during the next year.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 05-31-2013, 03:32 PM   #35
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
If you want something more aggressive than AT, but less aggressive than a typical MT, I suggest Good Year Duratrac, or Hankook Dynapro MT and add sipes added to center treads, or Mastercraft Courser CT, or Cooper ST and add extra sipes to center treads.

Of those, the Duratrac will be most civilized on road and have same or similar traction off road.

The Mastercraft CT and Cooper ST are the toughest with tougher sidewalls, which makes them very tear and puncture resistant, but they ride hard. i.e. - you feel every bump on and off road, but don't have to worry about tires holding up to hard use.

I am familiar with these tires from reviews, and from having owned Cooper ST before and after adding extra sipes, and I personally know people who own and wheel each of these tires, and my local tire store sells all of them and I've talked at length with the store owner comparing each.

I loved my Cooper ST after I added extra sipes to center treads, except for the harsh ride. My bad back felt every bump. A person with a healthy spine would probably love this tire. But if you drive on snow or ice, you MUST add extra sipes to center treads to get Winter traction. The Winter traction is good with extra sipes added to center treads. Without extra sipes they are slicker than snot on Winter roads.

The Mastercraft Courser CT is a first cousin to Cooper ST (since Mastercraft made by Cooper). The main difference is the CT has more and better center treads and factory sipes than the ST.

I don't know how long Duratrac last, but I know that Cooper ST and Mastercraft CT typically last 50K to 65K on a 1/4 ton or 1/2 ton SUV or truck.

Of these 3, I'd buy Duratrac because my tire store tells me it rides softer than the other 2. These what I'd call hybrid tires (between AT and MT). The tire industry usually calls them commercial traction tires.

Those are the hybrid (aka commercial traction) tires that offer the most sizes. Other brands of commercial tractiin tires don't offer enough size choices.

Hankook Dynapro MT is called an MT, but I consider it a hybrid, if you add sipes to center treads. I think it'd make a great hybrid (all purpose tire) if you want something more aggressive than AT, but less aggressive than most MT.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-01-2013, 03:53 AM   #36
ADragg
Registered User
2003 WJ 
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
The Duratrac is a great tire for sure, but I personally don't consider it an AT.

I consider it a hybrid tire (part AT, part MT), but you can call it an aggressive AT, if you prefer that phrase.

Whatever you call it, it does beat ATs off road, and beats MTs on road.

I personally don't believe Duratrac can compete with ATs on road (a big factor in the AT rankings), but it is a versatile tire that can be used anywhere. That's my personal opinion.

Tire Rack and Consumer Reports both apparently share my opinion because neither of them included Duratrac in their AT rankings. So there was no way I could include it in their AT rankings.

This in no way detracts from the awesome verstile Duratrac. I'm simply saying it shouldn't be classified as an AT because it's not comparable to ATs. Tire Rack and Consumer Reports didn't say that. They simply omitted it from their AT comparisons and rankings while saying nothing about it. Their AT rankings don't even mention it. Why? IMO they don't mention it because it's not an AT.

I think Duratrac is a great tire for people who want more aggressive than AT, and less aggressive than MT.
I don't think you nor myself are qualified to say whether or not it's an AT. "Hybrid" is a term that I've only heard you use, which is fine if you want to use it to describe a theoretical "style" of a tire or the look of it (as it LOOKS kind of like an MT in the sense that it's a an AT with deeper tread and wider voids that most AT's). You can say "the Duratrac is kind of a hybrid between an AT and an MT because it's an AT with aggressive tread", for instance, but you can't say "I classify it as a Hybrid", because that's not a real classification.

I understand that it's your personal opinion that the Duratrac can't compete with other AT's on road, but you don't seem to have any basis for that opinion. I don't think you have any actual experience with the Duratrac therefore are speculating. And it would seem that speculation comes from simply looking at the tread and determining that because the tread is more aggressive than most AT's (although not nearly as aggressive as an MT's I'm familiar with), it can't compete with them on road. As I mentioned in my previous post, in all of the searching I've done, most users of the tire have been blown away by it's on-road performance NOT compared to Mud Terrains (because it's not a Mud Terrain, it's an All Terrain), but compared to other all terrains. I've never heard anyone say "It's a good hybrid tire, it's quieter than most Mud Terrains". I just feel like all of these things you state as fact are not only not fact, but are completely speculations.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
Tire Rack does not consider Duratrac to be an AT. So they don't include or rank it among ATs.

Look here at Tire Rack's AT rankings:
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/survey....jsp?type=ORAT

Duratrac is not present among Tire Rack's AT rankings.

---

Tire Rack considers it to be a commercial traction tire, which is what the tire industry calls it. I call it hybrid because it's a good description.

Look here at Tire Rack's commercial tire rankings:
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/survey....jsp?type=ORCT

Tire Rack ranks Duratrac #1 commercial traction tire.
The fact that the Duratrac isn't listed with the rest of Tire Rack's AT Ratings isn't proof that Tire Rack doesn't consider it an AT. There's at least one other AT that's not in those AT Ratings, a very unaggressive AT called the Firestone Transforce AT. I think a more likely explanation is that the Duratrac was included in a much smaller category of Commercial Traction tires, and if there are any other AT's that have other specialties, they could be missing from the AT Ratings because they were instead included in another specialty category as well. The Firestone Transforce AT is missing from the AT Ratings but it's right there in Commercial Traction with the Duratrac, despite being much less aggressive. Again, I think any AT that had some specialty that could shuffle it into a smaller category would be missing from the Tire Rack AT Rankings.

No, Commercial Traction is not the same thing you've coined as "hybrid". Commercial Traction is an actual existing sub-category that is there for commercial companies who have fleet vehicles and need tires that fit their needs (which probably include things like long tread-life and ability to perform in snow/ice/wet weather). I would bet the main reason the Duratrac was put in that category is because it's the only AT they carry (possibly the only AT in existence) that carries the mountain/snowflake symbol. There are certain areas of the country that have mountain passes that you are not allowed to drive on without tires with that symbol. That's something a commercial company with huge fleets of vehicles cares about, especially depending on where they are in the country and what their vehicles are used for.

Regardless, saying that what you are calling "hybrid" is what the tire industry is calling Commercial Traction is completely invalid. Look at the other tires in that category. The Transforce AT is in there (despite being an AT and despite being very un-aggressive) and the other two tires look nothing like what you describe as a "hybrid". These are just tires that got shuffled into a different sub-category because they meet the standards that commercial companies might be looking for in a tire.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
GY marketing calls it an aggressive AT (even though it's not an AT) because most 4x4 enthusiasts are not familiar with the phrase "commercial traction" or "hybrid". So GY marketing call it "aggressive AT" so enthisiasts will take an interest in it (and that sells tires, doesn't it?). Good marketing by using incorrect terminology that's easier for new enthisiasts to understand. Hats off to GY marketing.
Goodyear, nor anyone else that I've seen, call it a "hybrid" because that's a made-up term that could be used to describe any tire that might be good at any two things. They don't call it a Commercial Traction Tire, because that's more of a sub-category that only commercial businesses care about and it wasn't necessarily specifically designed for them (however - it only made it into that sub-category because the Duratrac has many good ROAD characteristics, including characteristics rarely found in other All Terrains, and is suitable for fleet vehicles that need to be used for as many miles as possible in all weather, all seasons, on highways and in town, with good gas mileage, etc, etc. - ALL are things commercial businesses care about). They call it an aggressive AT because it's accurate. It doesn't take a brilliant marketing team to call an AT that's aggressive "an aggressive AT". That's just simply what it is. The only thing I can think of that it has in common with an MT is it's more aggressive tread, but it's still built as an AT, on an AT carcass, with characteristics found in AT's that either meet or exceed the standards of any quality AT.

The fact that it's reputed to be as good on-raod as it is and yet has fairly aggressive tread is pretty outstanding, but one could argue that with that reputation for being so good on road for an AT, and being much better in certain areas than average AT's, that the fact that it has such aggressive tread (for an AT) and does so well off-road in dirt and mud was an afterthought. Maybe it was just meant to be the next generation of light weight, soft-riding, quiet AT that was meant to excel extremely well in wet/icy weather and last a very long time, etc., but it just happened to end up with pretty aggressive tread that made it even better at dirt/rock/mud off-road situations as well. I could potentially argue that, but then again I'd just be speculating.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
Consumer Reports doesn't test or rate it at all because they don't consider it an AT, and they don't rate commercial traction tires.
That's not really a valid point. I wonder how many other AT's Consumer Reports didn't happen to test. It's generally best to take what Consumer Reports says with a grain of salt, anyway.
ADragg is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-01-2013, 04:29 AM   #37
ADragg
Registered User
2003 WJ 
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Las Vegas, NV
Posts: 301
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
Duratracs best on road performance features that are commonly cited are light weight, quiet, and good on wet pavement.

Let's look at those claims.

Light weight? Yes, it much lighter than MTs and weighs approx same as ATs. That is a huge accomplishment for Goodyear to make a tire this aggressive, reasonably tough, and still keep it light. That is an impressive feat of engineering.

Ride quality? Yes, it rides softer and smoother than MT; but the best AT ride softer and smoother. However, I do give credit to Duratrac for riding good. However, some best ATs have excellent ride.

Quiet on road? Yes, it is quiet compared to MT. Not so quiet compared to best AT.

Good wet pavement traction? Yes, it has better wet pavement traction than MT, and comparable to best AT.

Good hydroplaing restance? Yes! Its hydroplaning resistance is excellent, but the best ATs are good too.

Good snow and ice traction? Yes! Its snow and ice traction are excellent, but a few of the best ATs are also excellent.

Dry traction, cornering-handling, noise, rolling resistance (gas mileage) the Duratrac is good compared to MTs, but most (perhaps all) ATs are better in those areas.

A Duratrac is good on road for a moderately aggressive tire, but most ATs are better on road.

---

Off road the Duratrac beats ATs at most things, except sand. For sand I'd bet on any AT.
I think my Cooper AT3 would surprise you at how good it is off road, including some mud. Likewise Hankook ATM, Toyo AT2, General Grabber AT2, and a few other ATs would probably surprise you at how good they are off road, including some mud. My Cooper AT3 have impressed me on hard slick wet clay going up a very steep windy "road". My Cooper AT3 actually did better than my cousin's Toyo MT. I haven't tried my Cooper AT3 in deep mud, but reviews say they can handle 12" of goo.

In closing, I never said Duratrac isn't good. It is excellent (when you want something between AT & MT), but it's not an AT, and it can't compete on road with an AT. I give Duratrac credit for being better on road than any other tire with that level of semi-aggressive tread.

Duratrac is the best commercial traction (hybrid) tire on road, and I think it's one of the two best off road. The Mastercraft Courser CT being the other best commercial traction (hybrid) tire off road.
Spot saved so I can respond to these points when I have more time later, but the gist is that you don't have any experience with this tire and all of this is speculation. I will be happy to explain how in all of these areas the Duratrac is at least average or above average compared to other AT's and not even comparable to average MT's - and therefore not at all "in-between" as a "hybrid" would be. In almost every way, the Duratrac is either right on par with the norm of All Terrains and their characteristics or else it in fact performs better or leans FURTHER away from the characteristics of a Mud Terrain.
ADragg is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-01-2013, 07:03 AM   #38
mschi772
Registered User
1997 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 2,361
Quote:
Originally Posted by ADragg View Post
I would bet the main reason the Duratrac was put in that category is because it's the only AT they carry (possibly the only AT in existence) that carries the mountain/snowflake symbol.
I know Kumho SAT and Grabber AT2 are both snowflaked, and I'm sure there are others. I doubt that symbol has anything to do with it. That little symbol is a bit of a joke, though; there are tires that handle cold/snow just great without that symbol, and there are other tires with it that still suck anyway. I'm with you on everything else. Charley3 dispenses some good info and nice summaries, but it is uncomfortable and a little discrediting that he wants to restructure tire categories by inventing his own category and speak of it as if it's official. Is it really so important to have us all think of Duratracs as something else? Really? Even the accepted categories of AT, MT, touring, or whatever are all a bit arbitrary. They're primarily marketing tools and secondarily indices for consumers to get and idea of what to expect from a given tire.

At the end of the day, there's really only one tire category I personally care about--TIRE. I honestly don't care a bit if something is categorized as highway, touring, grand touring, commercial, AT, MT, or whatever. Every tire is different and falls into various places on various spectra because of unique individual characteristics. Adherence to categorization is a short-cut that can limit one's thinking if relied upon too much. Off the top of my head, BFG Rugged Terrain, Kumho SAT, Duratracs, Pirelli Scorpion ATR, even REVO 2s all bridge gaps between conventional tire categories. Heck, I might even throw MTR w/ Kevlar in there as well.

What's in a name? That which we call a tire by any other name would perform just as well.

Just look at the subtle change from a"touring" tire (Continental CrossContact LX20) to a "highway" tire (General Grabber HTS and Destination LE2) to an "AT" tire (Pirelli Scorpion ATR, Kumho SAT, and Bridgestone REVO 2). That's a pretty fine and arbitrary line already without people making-up their own categories willy-nilly. Yeah, the Conti touring tire looks different enough from the Kumho or the REVO, but could you be sure you'd draw the categorical lines in the same places as the manufacturers? Would you even know which of these was a highway or AT tire if I hadn't told you? How about the AT-MT line? It's a little more distinct especially in regards to weight, but look at these guys and see just how subtle the line can be even there. Yes, there is more to a tire than just its tread pattern--weight, compound, load rating, sidewall, etc--but I'm just trying to illustrate an idea here.











P.S. This recent turn in this discussion has given me some ideas prompted me to reassess the way I approach tire advice, hopefully for the better.
__________________
Might trade rebuilt 231 for new/rebuilt 242. Contact me.

New sig rules suck.
mschi772 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-02-2013, 01:23 AM   #39
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
ln one or more of my earlier posts, I said "I don't consider Duratrac to be an AT".

Saying "I don't consider..." indicates I'm stating my opinion, not a fact. Just like if I said "IMO". Same thing.

Then I explain the reasons for my opinion.

If someone doesn't agree with my opinon(s), that's OK. State your opinion(s) and explain your reasons, and then we have an interesting discussion.

---

I did state that Tire Rack and Consumer Reports both don't consider Duratrac to be an AT, and they both classify it as a commercial traction tire. It is a fact that they both classify it as a commercial traction tire, but that is their opinion.

---

I think it's appropriate to include Duratrac in this thread and I appreciate peoples interest in it, but I couldn't include it in the AT rankings because Tire Rack and Consumer Reports were my main sources for the rankings, and they didn't include Duratrac in their AT rankings (because they don't consider it an AT).

So I couldn't rank it with the ATs, but everyone who wants to post about Duratrac in this thread is welcome to do so. Info on it is appreciated.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-02-2013, 01:54 AM   #40
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
It's not just Consumer Reports that classified Duratrac as commercial traction, NOT as AT; it was also Tire Rack too. They both classify it as "commercial traction" and rank it as the best commercial traction tire.

---

IMO, the term "hybrid" is a good description and a lot more descriptive than "commercial traction". Also, the last time I was involved with 4x4 forums was a few years ago and at that time the term "hybrid" was commonly used. At worst, I'm guilty of being dated in my terminology. At best, I used a descriptive term. Either way, I didn't invent the category or the term "hybrid".

If you don't like my choice of terms for the category, do you want to use the official tire industry phrase? It's "commercial traction".

Do you want to use the newer phrase preferred by Goodyear's ad guys? It's "aggressive AT". I think Goodyear invented or popularized that phrase. If that is your preference, Goodyear's ad guys deserve a bonus.

Can we please stop haggling over terms?. What phrase do you guys want to call that type of tire?

Pick a phrase and I'll call it whatever you want, if you unanimously agree. Then I'll call it whatever you all want.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-02-2013, 02:09 AM   #41
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
Double post. Oops
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-03-2013, 04:47 AM   #42
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
Cooper AT3 mudding videos

Tug of war on snowy, slushy, muddy road.

Ford Ranger with BFG AT vs Ford Explorer with Cooper AT3.

http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=plcp&v=n7nZiR_f0Q0
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-03-2013, 12:07 PM   #43
silvanus
Registered User
2006 LJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Swanton,Vt.
Posts: 220
Thanks Charly,

I'll be looking tires after the summer, and will switch to AT rather than MT's. I've been setting up my TJ-L for overlanding and will need a very good AT tire. I too prefer an skinny tire, I'm currently riding on 33-10.5-15's, and plan on dropping down to 31's.

I wish tire manufacturers would make an 32-9.5 or 32-10.5-15 for the U.S. market! I think they would sell quite a few!

Very informative, Thanks for your researching Charly!!!

Carlo
silvanus is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-04-2013, 10:05 PM   #44
TJfunrun
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 1
I just joined this forum. I want to thank you all for the lively discussion about tires. I understand the issues involving semantics and labeling by tire manufacturers and companies that rate products--even jeepers themselves! I've been looking very closely at the Duratracs, and I'm thankful for all the pros and cons that were passed around in the discussion. I would love to see a tire made that handles all circumstances and driving situations -- tough sidewall and aggressive enough tread pattern to handle offload driving, including a bit of rock crawling, and at the same time, ride smooth and quiet on the road and handle well in wet situations. For me and my TJ and my driving needs the Duratrac probably is the best choice. I have BFG AT's on now (31x10.50x15) and while they're tough as nails and great on the road, they get pretty squirrelly on slick surfaces in the winter, especially as they wear. I've run Toyo's on pickups for years and I love them, but I fear their weight will effect mpg. So unless anyone has the miracle solution for someone like me who runs a basically stock TJ, then I thank you very much for putting all that information and opinion out there for people like me. Can't be too informed about major purchases.
TJfunrun is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 06-05-2013, 04:43 PM   #45
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,886
Quote:
Originally Posted by silvanus View Post
Thanks Charly,

I'll be looking tires after the summer, and will switch to AT rather than MT's. I've been setting up my TJ-L for overlanding and will need a very good AT tire. I too prefer an skinny tire, I'm currently riding on 33-10.5-15's, and plan on dropping down to 31's.

I wish tire manufacturers would make an 32-9.5 or 32-10.5-15 for the U.S. market! I think they would sell quite a few!

Very informative, Thanks for your researching Charly!!!

Carlo
There is a 32 x 10.5 R16 load C for you. See below.

You could run 265/75R16 load C on 16 x 8 with 5" BS. Duratrac and Mastercraft CT are available in load C in that size. I consider then to be between AT & MT.

Also, I'm sure there are several brands of ATs available in that size too. For example, Cooper AT3 is available in that size in load C (and in load E).
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the JeepForum.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid e-mail address for yourself.
Note: All free e-mails have been banned due to mis-use. (Yahoo, Gmail, Hotmail, etc.)
Don't have a non-free e-mail address? Click here for a solution: Manual Account Creation
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Thread Tools






Jeep, Wrangler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, and other models are copyrighted and trademarked to Jeep/Chrysler Corporation. JeepForum.com is not in any way associated with Jeep or the Chrysler Corp.