BFG Rugged Terrains on my Jeep - Page 2 - JeepForum.com
Search  
Sign Up   Today's Posts
User: Pass: Remember?
Advertise Here
Jeep Home Jeep Forum Jeep Classifieds Jeep Registry JeepSpace Jeep Reviews Jeep Gallery Jeep Clubs Jeep Groups Jeep Videos Jeep Events Jeep Articles
Go Back JeepForum.com > General Technical Discussions > Tires & Wheels > BFG Rugged Terrains on my Jeep

Brand New! Quadratec LED Headlights!FS: Wrangler RGB Multicolor Fog Light LEDs: Awesome EffectFS: 2007-2013 Jeep Wrangler "HALO" Angel Eye Kit

Reply
Unread 01-29-2014, 02:40 PM   #16
Kiwi Jeeper
Registered User
2001 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Auckland (New Zealand)
Posts: 806
Bit of an update after nearly 7 months of use. They are wearing well and provide good grip in wet conditions on road. Very happy with them, better than previous two sets of Goodyears and Bridgestones.

__________________
'01 TJ Renegade I6 4.0L
'03 WG Limited V8 4.7L
'12 JK Rubicon V6 3.6L
Kiwi Jeeper is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 01-30-2014, 12:45 AM   #17
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 3,479
I think BFG Rugged Trail and Rugged Terrain are good for paved road all weather and very good on gravel roads.

I prefer these types of tires for gravel roads because they don't pickup stones as much as AT do, and the gravel road traction is as good as AT, IMO.

Not sure how these type tires perform on Winter roads, but I assume they're pretty good. Anyone have input on them for Winter roads?
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 01-31-2014, 10:10 AM   #18
Bhamshooter
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: birmingham, AL
Posts: 599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
I think BFG Rugged Trail and Rugged Terrain are good for paved road all weather and very good on gravel roads.

I prefer these types of tires for gravel roads because they don't pickup stones as much as AT do, and the gravel road traction is as good as AT, IMO.

Not sure how these type tires perform on Winter roads, but I assume they're pretty good. Anyone have input on them for Winter roads?

I was actually going to update this thread sometime soon, but I got the email notification that a reply had been made. I'm sure y'all have heard about the snowstorm we got here, which quickly melted on the roads, and then quickly refroze into sheets of 1 inch thick ice, with snow falling on top of that. My wife got stranded about a half mile from work in her van and was able to find shelter at a local bakery. So she had coffee, heat, and food. She eventually had to hike about a half mile back to her building at work because she wasn't sure she would be able to get back inside after 4:30. I was stuck in gridlock in downtown bham, but once I finally broke through all of that I made it out of downtown. I had to drive up a fairly steep and winding road, covered in ice and snow, to get to her. I have a bone stock TJ and the 31x10.50 BFG Rugged Terrains on it. And I don't know what difference it would have made besides gearing, but a D30/D35 axle combo as well. No D44s yet. This was my first real experience with driving it under extreme conditions and needing 4WD. I put it in 4Lo and climbed that hill like it was dry.

I stayed the night with her at her work, then early the next morning while everything was still shut down, we made it out to a gas station and filled up. And had to drive up another steep hill, covered in ice and snow, avoiding the cars that were stranded there overnight, to get to our son who was still at daycare. We made it there, then made it home. And then I attempted to drive to a friends house who had picked up our daughter from school the day before when he made it there to pick his daughter up. They have been friends since their daycare days at just a few months old. Now in K5. I would have made it to his house except for a car that was left in the middle of the road. I thought briefly about pushing it out of the way with my bumper, but didn't want it, or me, to take off sliding down the ravine to my left if either of them were to slip unexpectedly. So I hiked uphill in the snow about a mile to get my daugher, put her on my back, and carried her back down, then drove home. I finally had to go pick my mother in law up from a hotel she was staying in. She has an Infiniti M35, that was going nowhere. Made it about 30 miles roundtrip, then up her winding road and got her safely home. The Jeep was a beast. My wife has made comments before about my vehicle being impractical for our family, needing another SUV, etc. She posted on her Instagram right as we made it safely home on Wednesday that she will never again accuse me of driving an impractical vehicle again. That by the Grace of God and the way of the Jeep we all made it home.

I do think a set of tire chains, a tow strap, a winch, and maybe a mild lift and some larger tires are in order though. I'll wait until these have a little more mileage on them before replacing, but with them being fairly new (less than 5k miles on them) they were excellent in the wintry conditions.

Oh, and this was before there was any salt/sand on the roads and before snow was plowed off. I saw several fellow Jeepers helping people out of the road, and I gave a few cars assistance as well when I encountered them. There were a few times I was wishing I had a strap with me to help pull people out of ditches.
Bhamshooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 01-31-2014, 07:05 PM   #19
Ed209
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Claremore, OK
Posts: 350
Even a 2" lift could introduce vibration problems, and your front and rear axles will shift in opposite directions, turning your TJ into a sidewinder going down the road, unless you get adjustable track bars. And for what - to run 32 or 33"? You'll only gain .5" or 1" ground clearance and the tires are more expensive. I don't see any real advantage to lifting unless going to 35" tires or bigger.
Ed209 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-01-2014, 10:44 AM   #20
3X4X4
Registered User
2006 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Valley Center, Kansas
Posts: 562
The Rugged Terrains are fine on snow. I am always amazed, being from down South myself, how unprepared for snow and ice and how utterly clueless people and governments types are down there. I stay home if possible, the real danger is not getting stuck but getting hit by a sliding vehicle or being blocked in by all of the front wheel drive ricers high centered on the snow track. Here, the roads are pre-treated 24 hours or more before weather moves in. The snowplows are staged and ready to rock and roll. Usually the roads are in pretty good shape unless it is really heavy.

My Toyota Tacoma TR/OR is better in the snow than my Jeep. It has the Rugged Terrains. Why is it better, the TRAC/VSC and anti-lock brakes. It goes through the snow and ice steady and sure.

Can anyone imagine buying a truck that is not 4WD? Well, down south they do all the time. But, it rarely snows down there. They get the look without the go and extra cost of 4WD, until the weather calls out the poseurs.

J
__________________
2006 TJ Rubicon, Custom 4 inch lift with Currie Arms, TF springs, RS9000 shocks, TF High Steer Kit, TF ST Dual rate anti-rock, TF front track bar, Yellow Box speedo correction, Black Rock 15X10 Streetlock wheels with BFG AT 33X15X12.5 tires, Line-X tub, Bed Rug carpet, Tom Woods shaft, Spidershade, Savvy corner and rocker armor, Exogate.
3X4X4 is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-01-2014, 09:13 PM   #21
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 3,479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bhamshooter View Post
I was actually going to update this thread sometime soon, but I got the email notification that a reply had been made. I'm sure y'all have heard about the snowstorm we got here, which quickly melted on the roads, and then quickly refroze into sheets of 1 inch thick ice, with snow falling on top of that. My wife got stranded about a half mile from work in her van and was able to find shelter at a local bakery. So she had coffee, heat, and food. She eventually had to hike about a half mile back to her building at work because she wasn't sure she would be able to get back inside after 4:30. I was stuck in gridlock in downtown bham, but once I finally broke through all of that I made it out of downtown. I had to drive up a fairly steep and winding road, covered in ice and snow, to get to her. I have a bone stock TJ and the 31x10.50 BFG Rugged Terrains on it. And I don't know what difference it would have made besides gearing, but a D30/D35 axle combo as well. No D44s yet. This was my first real experience with driving it under extreme conditions and needing 4WD. I put it in 4Lo and climbed that hill like it was dry.

I stayed the night with her at her work, then early the next morning while everything was still shut down, we made it out to a gas station and filled up. And had to drive up another steep hill, covered in ice and snow, avoiding the cars that were stranded there overnight, to get to our son who was still at daycare. We made it there, then made it home. And then I attempted to drive to a friends house who had picked up our daughter from school the day before when he made it there to pick his daughter up. They have been friends since their daycare days at just a few months old. Now in K5. I would have made it to his house except for a car that was left in the middle of the road. I thought briefly about pushing it out of the way with my bumper, but didn't want it, or me, to take off sliding down the ravine to my left if either of them were to slip unexpectedly. So I hiked uphill in the snow about a mile to get my daugher, put her on my back, and carried her back down, then drove home. I finally had to go pick my mother in law up from a hotel she was staying in. She has an Infiniti M35, that was going nowhere. Made it about 30 miles roundtrip, then up her winding road and got her safely home. The Jeep was a beast. My wife has made comments before about my vehicle being impractical for our family, needing another SUV, etc. She posted on her Instagram right as we made it safely home on Wednesday that she will never again accuse me of driving an impractical vehicle again. That by the Grace of God and the way of the Jeep we all made it home.

I do think a set of tire chains, a tow strap, a winch, and maybe a mild lift and some larger tires are in order though. I'll wait until these have a little more mileage on them before replacing, but with them being fairly new (less than 5k miles on them) they were excellent in the wintry conditions.

Oh, and this was before there was any salt/sand on the roads and before snow was plowed off. I saw several fellow Jeepers helping people out of the road, and I gave a few cars assistance as well when I encountered them. There were a few times I was wishing I had a strap with me to help pull people out of ditches.
Awesome story, but for future reference, use 4 Hi on Winter roads. It's better than 4 Lo because 4 Hi won't spin tires as easy when starting out, and you can drive faster too.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-01-2014, 09:17 PM   #22
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 3,479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ed209 View Post
Even a 2" lift could introduce vibration problems, and your front and rear axles will shift in opposite directions, turning your TJ into a sidewinder going down the road, unless you get adjustable track bars. And for what - to run 32 or 33"? You'll only gain .5" or 1" ground clearance and the tires are more expensive. I don't see any real advantage to lifting unless going to 35" tires or bigger.
You can lift a TJ front 2" without problems, and can lift rear 2.5" without problems that can't be fixed relatively cheaply (rotate rear pinion to correct pinion angle). That's why ARB/OME lifts are 2" front and 2.5" rear, if you use the springs they intend for the weight/gear of your Jeep.

Any higher than that, and then Eds concerns are totally valid and it's just not worth it, IMO.

Though I am conservative and sharing Ed's concerns, I lifted my XJ 1.5" front and 1.75" rear to ensure no problems. I dodn't even want minor problems to correct. Though it turns out I will need to spend another $100 and get my rear pinon rotated to 3.

You can run 31" with no lift, but they are more awesome with a 2/2.5 OME lift, IMO. The lift increases ground clearance under the belly and bumpers, and OME lifts don't need minimal bumpstop extention (see details of a given lift spring or kit). So OME lifts increase suspension uptravel, which means eats bumps more easily kind of prerunnerish. OME shocks are long and increase suspension down travel.

I had my LJ setup with OME springs and now my XJ is too. It's really eat bumps nicely without ever bottoming suspension. I think of it as being a hybrid of prerunner (extra suspension up-travel) and crawler (extra suspension down-travel).

Update: I revised my lift height vs driveline angle and vibration info in post 24.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-02-2014, 09:21 AM   #23
mschi772
Web Wheeler
 
mschi772's Avatar
1997 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 1,987
Talking about XJ's, depending on transmission, transfer case, and rear axle combo, 2" can and has created driveline vibration issues for people. I can't say for certain that they didn't do something wrong to create or aid the vibrations, but there are enough stories out there that I would be prepared for vibes on anything higher than a stock 1" UpCountry height.


The current discussion is regarding TJ's, however. TJ's have a shorter driveshaft and are more vulnerable to driveline problems. I have no doubt that driveline angles become too great even at a 2" lift under a Wrangler.


To comment on the official topic of the thread, I'm still skeptical of their ability to handle true winter conditions. I'm sure they're not terrible, but I'm sure they also have limitations, and I wonder what they are. Comments from southerners on how a 4x4 in 4wd could get from point A to point B using these tires doesn't really tell me a whole lot especially if automatic traction control is present as well. No offense, guys, but all I really know is that a little snowfall in your areas creates a disastrous panic and calamity--hard to take snow performance evaluations from residents of such a region too seriously. What happened down there recently sounds fairly nasty and, given the south's lack of practice, preparation, and infrastructure, truly does deserve to be called disasterous; I'm glad to hear you were able to get around safely and effectively despite the conditions. Those conditions are quite common for me, however, so a tire's need to handle them (and worse) is mandatory, not a bonus.

Having said that, it sounds like these are a perfect match for a southern Jeeper, at least. They look good, handle Alabama's normal conditions perfectly, and can handle a freak snow storm well enough if necessary. What more could you want, right?
mschi772 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-02-2014, 03:18 PM   #24
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 3,479
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschi772 View Post
Talking about XJ's, depending on transmission, transfer case, and rear axle combo, 2" can and has created driveline vibration issues for people. I can't say for certain that they didn't do something wrong to create or aid the vibrations, but there are enough stories out there that I would be prepared for vibes on anything higher than a stock 1" UpCountry height.
96+ XJ with 242 Tcase usually have vibration issues at 2" lift in rear.

That's why I lifted my 99 XJ with 242 Tcase 1.75" in rear. I am having minor vibrations. But rotating pinion of rear diff will fix it cheaply.

Mschi and Ed may be correct about lifting a TJ. I was thinking LJ because that's what I used to own. So my TJ advice was really LJ advice. I don't know anything about lifting a TJ.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-03-2014, 07:53 AM   #25
Bhamshooter
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: birmingham, AL
Posts: 599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
Awesome story, but for future reference, use 4 Hi on Winter roads. It's better than 4 Lo because 4 Hi won't spin tires as easy when starting out, and you can drive faster too.
I was having to crawl up hills, and 4 Hi wasn't working as well. And I do have a manual transmission, so I can control how little the tires were spinning starting out. I wasn't wanting to go over 15-20 in these conditions, so 4 Lo was perfect.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mschi772 View Post

Having said that, it sounds like these are a perfect match for a southern Jeeper, at least. They look good, handle Alabama's normal conditions perfectly, and can handle a freak snow storm well enough if necessary. What more could you want, right?

Exactly. To get everyone home safely. I do think how new they are played a role as well. We had a similar, but milder snowstorm last January. I still had some old worn down BFG A/Ts on the Jeep then. Sliding a little here and there. The gridlock wasn't a problem then but I did have to go rescue my wife that time and we made it to daycare to pick up our daughter and made it home.
Bhamshooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-03-2014, 01:19 PM   #26
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 3,479
My advice to use 4 Hi was for auto tranny. I incorrectly assumed you had an auto. For an auto, 4Hi is best on Winter roads.

For manual tranny use whichever seems more appropriate to the conditions. One nice thing about a manual tranny in 4 Lo is you have choice of starting out in 1st, 2nd, and perhaps 3rd. So manual tranny is very versatile in 4 Lo.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 02-03-2014, 02:50 PM   #27
Bhamshooter
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: birmingham, AL
Posts: 599
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
My advice to use 4 Hi was for auto tranny. I incorrectly assumed you had an auto. For an auto, 4Hi is best on Winter roads.

For manual tranny use whichever seems more appropriate to the conditions. One nice thing about a manual tranny in 4 Lo is you have choice of starting out in 1st, 2nd, and perhaps 3rd. So manual tranny is very versatile in 4 Lo.
I was starting in 2nd pretty much every time.
Bhamshooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-20-2014, 02:51 PM   #28
Bhamshooter
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: birmingham, AL
Posts: 599
Another update, and a question. I finally bought a matching 5th tire and had it rotated in. All fine and dandy. The problem is, the guys at the tire shop had an issue getting the spare mounted to the tailgate. They finally had to open it, mount the spare, and then shut it with some force. The size difference is only going from a 30x9.50 to a 31x10.50. But it is rubbing on my bumper. I have one of those Quadratec dual-tube bumpers. This one to be exact:



Now the tire shown in that pic is obviously larger than my 31. But it also appears that the 3rd brake light has been removed. Is there some sort of spacer I can get for my spare mount to extend it out past the bumper cutouts? It even says in the Q'tec site that:
Quote:
Rear bumpers feature a cutout to accommodate spare tires up to 33" in diameter.
I saw nothing else to indicate anything else wouldn't be stock. I haven't had the chance to inspect it that closely yet, but I'd rather the door swing freely instead of rubbing every time I open and close it.
Bhamshooter is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-23-2014, 09:09 AM   #29
Bhamshooter
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: birmingham, AL
Posts: 599
Just a heads up for anyone else that might have this bumper combo. You can mount it at two different heights. I know it is made to fit YJs and TJs. When I originally mounted it I mounted it above my hitch. I looked at it on Saturday and there are 3 sets of mounting holes, but only two bolts to hold it, so you can go Center/Top or Center/Bottom holes. I took it off and mounted it on the Center/Bottom holes instead. I had to loosen a bolt on either side of my hitch to get it to fit in there, then tightened it all back up. Now the door swings freely and the tire doesn't hit.

Another thing I noticed is that the spare carrier isn't centered. The 3rd brake light is centered, and my hitch is centered, but if you look at the bolts to put the spare on, the center one is offset to the right a little bit. That's one reason it was hitting the right side of the bumper only. While I had the spare off I took the 3rd brake light off, and added a few washers in each bolt to raise it up some so the tire wasn't rubbing on it.
Bhamshooter is offline   Reply With Quote




Jeep, Wrangler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, and other models are copyrighted and trademarked to Jeep/Chrysler Corporation. JeepForum.com is not in any way associated with Jeep or the Chrysler Corp.