best tire for snow, road and mud - Page 3 - JeepForum.com
Search  
Sign Up   Today's Posts
User: Pass: Remember?
Advertise Here
Jeep Home Jeep Forum Jeep Classifieds Jeep Registry JeepSpace Jeep Reviews Jeep Gallery Jeep Clubs Jeep Groups Jeep Videos Jeep Events Jeep Articles
Go Back JeepForum.com > General Technical Discussions > Tires & Wheels > best tire for snow, road and mud

The Original 3/8" Ruffstuff Diff Cover!Safety Thimble FairleadsEngo winches available at www.rockridge4wd.com! Free shipp

Reply
Unread 10-11-2013, 09:40 PM   #31
KKiowaTJ
Registered User
1995 YJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Iowa
Posts: 3,530
I sure as hell wouldn't want a worthless a/t in deep or light snow with all the designs and technology in the m/t tire of today. I would rather run my normal size and pay the ticket, That's if the cop is too stupid to notice massive biting edges and lugs that out perform a/t's all day long.
To each their own, But sounds like Canada just added another reason to **** their citizens and cost them more $$ with tire prices as high as they are with their 'snowflake' law .

__________________
YJ, TJ, XJ, ZJ..... Too many Jeeps!
KKiowaTJ is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-11-2013, 10:36 PM   #32
jfive
dos heeps
 
jfive's Avatar
2011 JK Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Denvah, CO
Posts: 257
I would agree with the BFG AT comments being poor in snow and in my experience of owning this tire on 2 different vehicles they're not really good on wet highways. I've found they float more than many other tires I've owned.

And for the comments on the harsh ride of the Toyo, I'd suggest you drive in a rig with them. In my JKU they're as nice as any MT I've run in my YJ (they're the only set I've run in my JKU). The wheelbase helps. I also don't have to stick a pound of weight on them to get them to balance. IIRC I've got 4 ounces max on each heavy Toyo
__________________
Cheers,
John
'11 JKU
'88 YJ
jfive is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-13-2013, 08:05 PM   #33
SLADE
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: 26537
Posts: 1,923
I'll take a Toyo Open Country MT or a Nitto Mud Grappler over a BFG A/T any day in the snow. I have ran all 3 at one point along with many others.


If you think BFG a/t's are good in the snow, you have no idea what you are missing. BFG a/t's and KM2's are overrated, over priced, and underperforming.
__________________
2014 Wrangler JKU
2013 Wrangler JK
2004 Wrangler TJ on LEAFS
2001 Dodge Ram 2500
SLADE is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-13-2013, 08:52 PM   #34
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,847
Most MT are terrible on ice. Many times I've seen 4x4s with MT sliding off the road on ice while people with AT and AS are easily driving past them. Even 2 wheel drive rear wheel drive cars with AS driving right past the guys with their big MT. It's laughable when soccer moms in 2wd mini-vans are driving past 4x4s with MT that can't cut it on ice.

I saw that ^ every Winter when I was a kid growing up in the Pacific Northwest Cascade Mountains. I live in the lowlands now. So less snow and ice, but when it does get slick I still see some MT slipping on ice like beached whales struggling for life while people with AT and AS drive right past them.

Though I should add that where I live, the ice and snow are generally wet and near the freezing/melting point. So wet very slippery ice. Ice that is colder is also drier and less slick. In fact, if it gets cold enough, ice can get sticky (like when tongue sticks to a frozen juice can from the deep freeze). Very cold ice offers good traction because tires and shoes stick to it. So people from colder regions might not realize how slippery the warmer wet ice is in my area. In my area lots of sipes are a requirement, and soft grippy rubber helps too.

However, there are a few MT that are good on wet slippery ice. The MT with softer rubber and lots of sipes have good enough traction on wet slick ice. The more sipes the better for ice.

Trxus MT and Duratrac come to mind as being pretty good on ice here. Though I realize Duratrac isn't really an MT, it certainly isn't a typical AT either - it's in between. I've heard Toyo MT with extra sipes added to center treads are good on ice.

Does the OP just need to deal with snow only, or snow and ice? At what temperatures typically? Temp is important because the colder it is, the better the snow and ice traction, while warmer snow and ice are wetter and slicker. Especially warmer ice is very slick.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-15-2013, 08:24 AM   #35
Michel347
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Laurentians, Quebec
Posts: 135
Quote:
Originally Posted by KKiowaTJ View Post
I sure as hell wouldn't want a worthless a/t in deep or light snow with all the designs and technology in the m/t tire of today. I would rather run my normal size and pay the ticket, That's if the cop is too stupid to notice massive biting edges and lugs that out perform a/t's all day long.
To each their own, But sounds like Canada just added another reason to **** their citizens and cost them more $$ with tire prices as high as they are with their 'snowflake' law .
I've seen too many accidents in my life because of people not properly equipped for driving in winter conditions.

Managing vehicles fleet in a big company makes you understand that providing winter driving lessons and equip vehicles with dedicated winter tires equal to savings, in lowering the cost of insurances, cost of accident repairs, cost associated with injuries and deaths. This is also valid for individuals and society.

It's not only related to massive biting edges and lugs, but mainly to compound. Two identical tires with different compound won't perform the same. Even on dry the winter tires will outperform the all seasons ones at 45F and below.
Michel347 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-15-2013, 12:45 PM   #36
KKiowaTJ
Registered User
1995 YJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Iowa
Posts: 3,530
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michel347 View Post
I've seen too many accidents in my life because of people not properly equipped for driving in winter conditions.

Managing vehicles fleet in a big company makes you understand that providing winter driving lessons and equip vehicles with dedicated winter tires equal to savings, in lowering the cost of insurances, cost of accident repairs, cost associated with injuries and deaths. This is also valid for individuals and society.

It's not only related to massive biting edges and lugs, but mainly to compound. Two identical tires with different compound won't perform the same. Even on dry the winter tires will outperform the all seasons ones at 45F and below.



Once again, It comes down to common sense when driving in bad elements. It gets cold here and the lugs slap a little louder, Don't mean im going to waste another $1500 on 'snowflakes' for a few months when I can, Have, and will continue to drive on a m/t tire flawless if you use, Again, Common sense.
If you lack skill and the soft winter tires are the only thing you can navigate with, That's you're short coming. I drive to the conditions and have yet to have a problem no matter what element im driving in. Tire technology is not what it was yesterday and the m/t's of the newer design(s) and compounds allow that.
__________________
YJ, TJ, XJ, ZJ..... Too many Jeeps!
KKiowaTJ is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-15-2013, 12:57 PM   #37
mschi772
Web Wheeler
 
mschi772's Avatar
1997 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 2,255
Quote:
Originally Posted by KKiowaTJ
Once again, It comes down to common sense when driving in bad elements. It gets cold here and the lugs slap a little louder, Don't mean im going to waste another $1500 on 'snowflakes' for a few months when I can, Have, and will continue to drive on a m/t tire flawless if you use, Again, Common sense. If you lack skill and the soft winter tires are the only thing you can navigate with, That's you're short coming. I drive to the conditions and have yet to have a problem no matter what element im driving in. Tire technology is not what it was yesterday and the m/t's of the newer design(s) and compounds allow that.
I really want to pick apart your assertion that MT are great for anything but deep snow (unless of course they're specifically rated for it, but then I'd still prefer something else anyway), but you're clearly entrenched in that opinion, so whatever. Hopefully you never find yourself in a situation where your skill can't help you anymore.

I will however point out that snow tires are never a waste of money. Time spent on snow tires is time not spent on other tires. Your other tires will last longer time-wise, so you'll have to replace them less often. You'll still get the exact same number of miles per dollar as you did before. Extra set of wheels? Pocket change in the long run for cheap steroids for the winter months, so I don't even count them as part of the cost. Sent from my phone
mschi772 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-15-2013, 09:25 PM   #38
KKiowaTJ
Registered User
1995 YJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Iowa
Posts: 3,530
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschi772 View Post
I really want to pick apart your assertion that MT are great for anything but deep snow (unless of course they're specifically rated for it, but then I'd still prefer something else anyway), but you're clearly entrenched in that opinion, so whatever. Hopefully you never find yourself in a situation where your skill can't help you anymore.

I will however point out that snow tires are never a waste of money. Time spent on snow tires is time not spent on other tires. Your other tires will last longer time-wise, so you'll have to replace them less often. You'll still get the exact same number of miles per dollar as you did before. Extra set of wheels? Pocket change in the long run for cheap steroids for the winter months, so I don't even count them as part of the cost. Sent from my phone


I drive to the conditions of road and rig for safety. I get to the same places a few minutes late so I plan ahead. I have went all out to see the outcome and it holds fine just like a good a/t to an extent, But not worth the trouble. I can slow down a bit and give a wide berth for braking. Never failed me yet and I have always ran a m/t or a m/s tire. But I know what im driving and the reactions, Like I said, To each their own.
__________________
YJ, TJ, XJ, ZJ..... Too many Jeeps!
KKiowaTJ is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-15-2013, 09:34 PM   #39
noleyy
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 38
K can we please get back to topic I'm wanting to know what will be best pluss I want at least a 35
noleyy is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-15-2013, 10:19 PM   #40
KKiowaTJ
Registered User
1995 YJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Iowa
Posts: 3,530
Quote:
Originally Posted by noleyy View Post
K can we please get back to topic I'm wanting to know what will be best pluss I want at least a 35

That is 'on topic'. If you want a tire for mud and snow, You will want a newer technology, Better compound m/t. Factory sipes, Great DD ride. I have ran many types and styles.
Best 'all around tire' for what you originally listed, Would be a STT or Toyo m/t. Both come in 35" and are great in any condition. Get used to them and how they react in certain conditions and drive on them. Good luck either way
__________________
YJ, TJ, XJ, ZJ..... Too many Jeeps!
KKiowaTJ is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-15-2013, 11:16 PM   #41
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Posts: 3,847
Quote:
Originally Posted by Michel347 View Post
Just the small snow flake is not enough starting this year, it needs the pictogram representing a mountain with a superimposed snowflake.
The mountain and snowflake superimposed is what I meant by snowflake rating.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-16-2013, 12:39 PM   #42
Dave2002ti
Web Wheeler
2012 WK 
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Clifton, VA
Posts: 1,307
Sorry Wrong

M/Ts and A/Ts just dont have the tread compounds that a good winter tire has.
They make a significant difference in handling and braking. Now its great you got to where you need to go on your M/Ts but you were lucky and its probably wasnt driver skill.

I was at BMWCCA drivers school at Summit Point in early Nov and then went to dinner with some friends in Winchester. When we all left the restaurant the parking lot and roads were covered with a nice Fall snow. I had nearly bald Yokohama 008s on my 90 3 series. I got on I81 and drove 3 exits to my motel I figured my death would be quick at 55mph in the snow with the 18 wheelers. Some how I got to my exit and then slid the half mile to my motel. Drivers skill I had it but I was just damn lucky and the man upstairs was looking out for me. I had a lot of wet skidpad time back then but I would have preferred being on winter tires.
Dave2002ti is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-17-2013, 11:03 AM   #43
ton45
Registered User
2005 LJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley3 View Post
Snow flake rated AT or AS cut it, IMO.

Don't your laws recognize snow flake rated (Winter rated) tires?

I have heard from other Canadians that winter rated ATs are acceptable for your laws and insurance. Also Winter rated AS (all season).
I lifted this from the site that regulates these laws in Quebec where I live.

"What is the definition of winter tires?

The regulation defines tires specifically designed for winter driving as those that meet one of the following criteria prior to December 15, 2014:

Tires on which one of the following inscriptions appear: Alaska, Arctic, A/T or AT, AT/S, AT-S , Blizzard, Cresta, Ice, INSA T1, INSA T2, INSA TT770, LT, Nordic, Snow (but not mud and snow), Stud, Studdable, Studded, Studless, TS, Ultra grip , Ultratraction or Winter, or the icon representing a mountain with a superimposed snowflake.

Or

Tires that are equipped with studs and used in accordance with the Regulation respecting the use of non-skid devices on the tires of certain road vehicles.

Starting on December 15, 2014, tires will have to bear the icon or be equipped with studs and be used in accordance with the Regulation respecting the use of non-skid devices on the tires of certain road vehicles.
ton45 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-17-2013, 11:05 AM   #44
ton45
Registered User
2005 LJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 7
They also say this for the reasoning:

What is the purpose of this measure of the Highway Safety Code?

It is designed to increase road safety.

Information collected in 2005 shows that 38% of the accidents that occur during the winter involve at least one vehicle that is equipped with all-season tires. These vehicles are strongly overrepresented in these accidents, as it is estimated that before 2008, 90% of passenger vehicles were driven with winter tires. In addition, the proportion of the occurrence of loss of control is even higher when the vehicles involved are equipped with all-season tires.

Tires that are designed specifically for winter driving conditions are a safe solution for driving in winter. They are designed to achieve maximum adherence on snow or ice covered surfaces.
ton45 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Unread 10-17-2013, 12:51 PM   #45
musicbis
Registered User
2004 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Cottonwood, AZ.
Posts: 34
I have settled on a tire that has good feed back every where I have read up on them. Made by Goodyear. Kelly Safari TSR. I have mounted some for a customer in the past and they balanced out well taking much less weight than most tires of the same size. Reported good wear with regular rotation, no surprise there though, regular rotations will extend the life of any tire. That said the TSR is reported to wear better than average. Supposed to good in wet and snow. Price is lower than most as well.

We will see how they do. Saving up right now.

Just sharing what I have found with my research.

Chris
musicbis is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the JeepForum.com forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid e-mail address for yourself.
Note: All free e-mails have been banned due to mis-use. (Yahoo, Gmail, Hotmail, etc.)
Don't have a non-free e-mail address? Click here for a solution: Manual Account Creation
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Thread Tools






Jeep, Wrangler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, and other models are copyrighted and trademarked to Jeep/Chrysler Corporation. JeepForum.com is not in any way associated with Jeep or the Chrysler Corp.