Best brand or type of snow tire chain for off road vechicle tires. Goodyear MTR's - JeepForum.com
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Unread 09-29-2008, 07:58 PM   #1
Rubi Unlimited
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Best brand or type of snow tire chain for off road vechicle tires. Goodyear MTR's

2005 Unlimited Rubicon. With the original Goodyear MTR's

I will likely not need them but want to have a set in the vehicle for a trip into an unfamiliar area of the mountains this winter.

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Unread 09-29-2008, 09:08 PM   #2
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You'll void axle warranties if you put chains on. Manual even says don't use chains. It adds to much rotational weight. You could get those cable type, but honestly with a Rubicon if you can get stuck on paved moutain roads, then you can't drive. Better alternatives: Get the MTR's siped, get some cheap steelie rims & put on some General Grabber AT2s, or get some studded tires.

I dont have lockers and I have never had a problem in 4wd & BFG ATs. I've gone thru white outs, blizzards and sheets of ice on Loveland Pass, Clear Creek Canyon, Ike Tunnel, US36 and 93. Tires will do you better than chains, and those MTRs will slide on ice like crazy, so get some better tires.
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Unread 09-29-2008, 09:48 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Unlimited04 View Post
You'll void axle warranties if you put chains on.
Ok so every combination of "jeep" "studded" and "snow" that I come up with gives me little to work with.

I know at least that if it is to be a winter only tire than it would benefit from being more narrow than the current MTR's on the vehicle.

Studded tires seem to be hard to research for some reason.
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Unread 09-30-2008, 07:56 AM   #4
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LaClede makes a good quality chain. I seriously doubt that added weight of a chain is going hurt anything in you're drivetrain I mean come on people put big tires on that out weigh a tire chain by how much? 5 pound chain 90 pound tire! Even if you were to use them and somehow break an axle the dealer would have to prove that you were using them.
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Unread 09-30-2008, 12:09 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by Rubi Unlimited View Post
I know at least that if it is to be a winter only tire than it would benefit from being more narrow than the current MTR's on the vehicle.

Studded tires seem to be hard to research for some reason.
Actually a 10.5" tire is about perfect for the winter. Studded tires are usually on cars, for Jeep's you'll probably need to have them studded at Discount Tire or someplace. I wouldn't buy from Q-tec, but they had the quickest link: http://www.quadratec.com/products/92612_1XX_PG.htm These have boses for studs.

General Grabber AT2's are another good option: http://www.offroaders.com/tech/AT-MT...abber-AT-2.htm

They are supposedly better than BFG ATs in the snow/ice. I've had very good traction in ice/snow with my BFG's. I've been on the breck side of the Ike tunnel on a full sheet of ice before. Climbing that pass is not fun, especially with a 42RLE, but as soon as I started feeling the back end slipping, I put it in 4wd and walked around everybody. 2wd's stalled everywhere with tires spinning. You don't want to be chaining up in the middle of the highway, its dangerous and even when you get chains on, you can't go very fast, and then you need to stop again and take them off. They serve they're purpose off road or in deep stuff, like if you feel like heading to Boreas Pass, Jones Pass or something in January, but for street use on a Jeep they aren't necessary. Boreas Pass and Jones Pass will be snowmobile only at that time anyway...10-15ft of snow no doubt.

Like I said, I made it thru the 2006 blizzard on US36 with nearly bald stock GSA's. Some other jeepers, me and National Guard H1's were the only thing moving. The 31x10.50 BFG's got me through last winter perfectly (I did the Breck/Keystone/Vail trip almost every weekend, storm or not), you can't go 70mph in an ice storm, but you'll get there just fine. You can lock up the brakes easy on ice too, so definitely use 4wd + downshifting + slight brakes to slow down.

Quote:
Originally Posted by elkfan2
I seriously doubt that added weight of a chain is going hurt anything in you're drivetrain I mean come on people put big tires on that out weigh a tire chain by how much? 5 pound chain 90 pound tire! Even if you were to use them and somehow break an axle the dealer would have to prove that you were using them.
Chains don't just add extra rotational weight like big tires, they add a surging of traction. The tire sees SLIP-TRACTION-SLIP-TRACTION in between tread-chain interaction with the road surface. Thats like throttling the gas on an incline, going airborn with wheel spin, then coming down and having the tires hit a sudden stop as they grab traction. That's what breaks axles.

And how many people with big tires wear out ball joints, break long side axle shafts and destory u-joints? LOTS. The D30 (and Rubi D44) are the same on the outside, where chains (and big tires) will cause the most stress.

on 4x4's chains need to be run on all 4 tires, or the fronts only. You can't run just the rears (unless you're in 2wd) because you're tires will want to spin at different speeds as the rear pushes on the fronts (with less traction).
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Unread 09-30-2008, 12:59 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unlimited04 View Post
You'll void axle warranties if you put chains on. Manual even says don't use chains. It adds to much rotational weight. You could get those cable type, but honestly with a Rubicon if you can get stuck on paved moutain roads, then you can't drive. Better alternatives: Get the MTR's siped, get some cheap steelie rims & put on some General Grabber AT2s, or get some studded tires.

I dont have lockers and I have never had a problem in 4wd & BFG ATs. I've gone thru white outs, blizzards and sheets of ice on Loveland Pass, Clear Creek Canyon, Ike Tunnel, US36 and 93. Tires will do you better than chains, and those MTRs will slide on ice like crazy, so get some better tires.
Never been to WA or OR I see. Many roads there close to all vehicles except 4x4 WITH chains. Paved or not 3-4 feet of snow, unplowed makes driving interesting, esp when ice is mixed in there. I have run chains on my Jeep a few times up there when there was no snow at all; just 2 inches of frozen rain coating the roads. 5mph with chains was hairy; I was taking docs and nurses to work.
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Unread 09-30-2008, 01:26 PM   #7
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Never been to WA or OR I see. Many roads there close to all vehicles except 4x4 WITH chains.
X2! You can get a ticket if you dont run chains when they are required on the major passes here.
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With more stupid comments? Two retards don't make a right.
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Unread 09-30-2008, 08:58 PM   #8
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Its hard to explain but I've been told by many that live where they get lots of snow covered roads but in a drier climate then they come here and try to drive on our winter roads and they cant its kind of funny. Me personally I have never needed chains but do carry them for when we go over the passes.

Quote unlimited04
Chains don't just add extra rotational weight like big tires, they add a surging of traction. The tire sees SLIP-TRACTION-SLIP-TRACTION in between tread-chain interaction with the road surface. Thats like throttling the gas on an incline, going airborn with wheel spin, then coming down and having the tires hit a sudden stop as they grab traction. That's what breaks axles.

They make chains now days that have a link that connects the the horizontal chains that run across the treadface together. That does two things, it gives your vehicle lateral stability, and makes it so there is always chain in contact with the road so you dont get "slip" that you're talking about.
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Unread 10-01-2008, 09:30 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by elkfan2 View Post
Its hard to explain but I've been told by many that live where they get lots of snow covered roads but in a drier climate then they come here and try to drive on our winter roads and they cant its kind of funny. Me personally I have never needed chains but do carry them for when we go over the passes.

Quote unlimited04
Chains don't just add extra rotational weight like big tires, they add a surging of traction. The tire sees SLIP-TRACTION-SLIP-TRACTION in between tread-chain interaction with the road surface. Thats like throttling the gas on an incline, going airborn with wheel spin, then coming down and having the tires hit a sudden stop as they grab traction. That's what breaks axles.

They make chains now days that have a link that connects the the horizontal chains that run across the treadface together. That does two things, it gives your vehicle lateral stability, and makes it so there is always chain in contact with the road so you dont get "slip" that you're talking about.

So Boggers would break my axles as the lateral (chain-like pattern)treads on them "slip-traction-slip" on dirt or mud? The chain is digging into the snow (or mud, works great there also) and acts as a paddle. Unless you are on bare roads there is not load-unload as described. As one cross link is letting go another is biting in unless you are giving it waaaay to much throttle.
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Unread 10-01-2008, 01:28 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elkfan2 View Post
Its hard to explain but I've been told by many that live where they get lots of snow covered roads but in a drier climate then they come here and try to drive on our winter roads and they cant its kind of funny. Me personally I have never needed chains but do carry them for when we go over the passes.
1. Mountain passes - colorado has some of the highest passes in the country. Loveland Pass is 12,000 ft and open year round (weather permitting). I've got pictures of snow as high as a semi-truck. The Eisenhower tunnel cuts through the continental divide at 11,100 ft, it can be sunny and perfect on one side, and a blizzard on the other side.
2. The original poster is from Wheat Ridge, CO, about 50 minutes from where I'm at.
3. You don't need chains in Colorado IF you have the right tires and you drive smart.
4. I've been on ice before, in fact, every time I drive the formentioned tunnel, I typically end up stopped in traffic, with the wind blowing me sideways. Sometimes its too slippery to walk on the highway without crampons. But if I keep it in 4wd and keep moving, no problems.... I grew up in Michigan, so I've seen wet snow too....and again...never saw the need for chains on the highway....
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Unread 10-01-2008, 02:02 PM   #11
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1. Mountain passes - colorado has some of the highest passes in the country. Loveland Pass is 12,000 ft and open year round (weather permitting). I've got pictures of snow as high as a semi-truck. The Eisenhower tunnel cuts through the continental divide at 11,100 ft, it can be sunny and perfect on one side, and a blizzard on the other side.
2. The original poster is from Wheat Ridge, CO, about 50 minutes from where I'm at.
3. You don't need chains in Colorado IF you have the right tires and you drive smart.
4. I've been on ice before, in fact, every time I drive the formentioned tunnel, I typically end up stopped in traffic, with the wind blowing me sideways. Sometimes its too slippery to walk on the highway without crampons. But if I keep it in 4wd and keep moving, no problems.... I grew up in Michigan, so I've seen wet snow too....and again...never saw the need for chains on the highway....

Excellent post except that in some states chains are MANDATORY for driving on certain roads. Not CO and so not applicable to the OP but there are times when chains are needed.
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Unread 10-01-2008, 08:08 PM   #12
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Thanks for the responses thus far however the purpose of the chains if for deep in the backwoods off road potential oh s*** type of problems.

Not necessarily the Icy mountain pass roads such as the Mandatory chain areas sometimes encountered near Eisenhower tunnel.
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Unread 10-02-2008, 12:31 AM   #13
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buy a set of decent winter tires. put studs in cant go wrong . hey i live in canada
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Unread 10-02-2008, 01:00 AM   #14
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oops.... (sorry i dident under stand your question earlier)... invest in a good winch, new mud tires, GO with your buddies.
have fun.
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