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-   -   Alternative Snow Chains? (http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f15/alternative-snow-chains-1797257/)

turkish6 11-16-2013 04:14 PM

Alternative Snow Chains?
 
Hey everyone,

So I am looking to buy snow chains or an alternative for my wife's car. It is a front wheel drive car. I am not to fond of chains and was looking for an alternative and came across the following. Does anyone have any experience with these or something similar? Thanks

http://www.sahibinden.com/ilan/yedek...44089763/detay

5-90 11-16-2013 07:48 PM

Dunno - I've never used tyre chains or cable, and I see no reason to. FWD, RWD, AWD, 4AWD - if you just THINK AHEAD, you're not likely to run into trouble.

My sole concession to foul weather, usually, was to get out two bags of sand (80# each) to put behind the back seat of my Bug back home. Added traction to get started - and, if I got well & truly stuck, I could open up a bag and scatter sand under the rear tyres to get some grip (usually because I'd parked on ice somehow.)

I decided chains and such were a lost cause when I was driving back home to see family one Christmas (SJC-IND, up I80 into the mountains to Reno) and I saw FWD vehicles with chains on the rear tyres, or 4WD vehicles in the same setup (if you have 4WD, you are supposed to shift into 4HI and put your chains on the front tyres to gain control over steering - 4WD is torque-biased slightly toward the front axle anyhow.)

That trip, I was able to handle the snow & rain better in 4AWG with four bald A/T tyres than anyone else could with good tyres and/or chains - that cemented my opinion that skill counts for FAR more than equipment!

JPGoody 11-17-2013 06:31 PM

Tire Socks?
 
I saw a semi the other day with "tire socks" on. It was an early season snow storm and the chain requirement was on above 8,500 ft for commercial vehicles.

They seemed to be effective.

I've got a set of chains as a legal requirement at the time, used as a test and then for fun at deer camp one year, they have been unused in 6 years, prob won't even fit a 30x9.5 now that I think of it.

Sock On!

samger2 11-23-2013 06:37 PM

Why not just a good set of snow tires?

wilson1010 11-23-2013 07:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by samger2 (Post 17959330)
Why not just a good set of snow tires?

Agreed. Studded if need be. But, do they have any snow in New Jersey?

turkish6 11-28-2013 11:20 AM

New Jersey usually does get a few good snow storms. However currently I am overseas. (I haven't updated my profile yet sorry)

I do of coarse prefer a good set of snow tires and studded would be best of coarse. However funds are a bit tight right now and legally if we don't have snow tires on the car we have to carry chains in the car at all times. So I am looking at alternatives to chains that may be easy to use and/or safer to use for the car as well.

Charley3 12-04-2013 08:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 5-90 (Post 17764961)
That trip, I was able to handle the snow & rain better in 4AWG with four bald A/T tyres than anyone else could with good tyres and/or chains - that cemented my opinion that skill counts for FAR more than equipment!

You must be the best driver ever. Either that, or an incredibly skilled BS-er. Which seems more likely?

Skill does count for a lot, but so does good tires. A good combination of both is ideal.

5-90 12-04-2013 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Charley3 (Post 18260426)
You must be the best driver ever. Either that, or an incredibly skilled BS-er. Which seems more likely?

Skill does count for a lot, but so does good tires. A good combination of both is ideal.

Skill derived from learning to drive in snow, shifting dirt, gravel, &c while growing up.

Paying attention counts for far more than you'd think - look out past the end of your nose, and keep thinking. Don't keep sticking your nose in your coffee cup - pay attention to what's going on around you.

Select a vehicle that is far less likely to get stuck. Some little front-wheel-drive econobox is a bad choice. AWD or 4WD

If the weather (snow, rain, fog, dust, whatever) gets too thick to see, pull well over and stop. I've dealt with all of those, and had to stop when they got bad.

The saddest part about people getting into trouble in foul weather is simple - they stop thinking, which results in dying of the dumbs. (I don't mind so much when someone dies of the dumbs, but it makes me very cranky to find that they took someone else with them...)

Charley3 12-04-2013 09:07 PM

I do agree that a skilled driver helps a lot.

I used to practice snow/ice driving every chance I could when young.
I even went to a deserted area and practiced drifting and controlled skids and correcting out of skids. I also practiced and mastered controlled 180s driving forwards and backwards.

Note: I did the 180s using highway tires on hard packed snow/ice. A well siped AT or a Winter tire has to much traction to have that much fun. I've tried repeating those controlled 180s using good well siped ATs on my Jeep, and Winter tires on my car, and they have to much traction for 180s. I can't get the better tires to slide much because they have to much lateral traction, and to much braking traction. It's even difficult to get better tires to do drifts.

So clearly the tire matters a lot.
I also practiced braking fast as possible while staying under control. That takes skill using a highway tire. It's relatively easy using a Winter rated AT, and very easy using a Winter tire (no studs needed).

Good fun and good practice. Practice that made me a good Winter driver. Also, don't just watch the car ahead. Watch several cars ahead.

However, any driver benefits from better tires, and most drivers need every advantage they can get. Better tires help make it easier and safer.

Charley3 12-04-2013 09:50 PM

Oops. I missed where you said for a car. I was thinking SUV/Jeep tires when I mentioned ATs.

For a car get some Hankook Ipike Winter tires. They are good for year round use, even though they are Winter tires. That's convenient, if you want to leave them on all year.

I have them on my Buick car. They have really good snow and ice traction after an initial 500 miles break in period. Before the break-in period is up, the Winter traction is OK. After break-in, the Winter traction is excellent.

Break-in makes traction better because the tire mold lubricant wears off, or washes off (not sure which) and the treads get scruffed by pavement over a few hundred miles use, which increases traction too.

If you leave them on year round, they are warrented to last 40K miles, though it looks like I'll get 50K from mine. Mine already have 10K miles on them and show no wear than I can see.

They are studdable, but I did not have studs added to mine. My car does great on snow and good on ice. No studs or chaines needed.

===

Nokian makes excellent Winter tires, both of the year round use type, and the dedicated Winter type. Nokian is another good choice, but is expensive. The Hankook cost less.

===

The least expensive choice is Hercules Avalanche Xtreme Passenger snow tires. They are USA owned and made (unlike Nokian or Hankook) and are excellent for Winter traction. They are studdable, but you won't need studs or chains with these tires. Like the Hankook Ipike, they can be used year round and reviews says the Hercules Avalanche Xtreme passenger tires last around 45K miles of year round use (same as Hankook Ipike lasts).

turkish6 12-06-2013 01:39 PM

Thank you for the tire recommendations and the driving tips. However right now we are not able to afford a new set of tires. We just purchased the car new and they came your basic all season tire from the dealer. The amount of snow we see in the area is not to much and I know we will be able to handle it with the new tires and our careful driving. The reason for the chains is, is that by law we have to carry a set of chains in the vehicle at all times during the winter months. Otherwise we can get a ticket.

hustler905 12-06-2013 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turkish6 (Post 18307554)
by law we have to carry a set of chains in the vehicle at all times during the winter months. Otherwise we can get a ticket.

Find a used set on Craigslist, or check a used tire shop. If you're only carrying chains as a method to satisfy what sounds like a silly law, it really shouldn't matter what you get.

Charley3 12-06-2013 08:53 PM

Chains are cheap. I suggest cable chains since they work up to higher speeds than chain chains.

Charley3 12-06-2013 08:56 PM

Also, I'll add that all season tires aired down 5 lbs below normal pressure do rather well in Winter conditions with careful driving.


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