ZJ/ WJ FAQs. *READ FIRST* -- Contact a mod for changes/additions - Page 3 - JeepForum.com
Search  
Sign Up   Today's Posts
User: Pass: Remember?
Advertise Here
Jeep Home Jeep Forum Jeep Classifieds Jeep Registry JeepSpace Jeep Reviews Jeep Gallery Jeep Clubs Jeep Groups Jeep Videos Jeep Events Jeep Articles
Go Back JeepForum.com > Models > Jeep Grand Cherokee & Commander Forums > ZJ Grand Cherokee Forum > ZJ/ WJ FAQs. *READ FIRST* -- Contact a mod for changes/additions

Introducing MONSTALINER™ UV Permanent DIY Roll On Bed LineDan's Old as Dirt Birthday Sale!GEARSHADE Pocket Tops in stock and available at ROCKRIDGE

Closed Thread
Unread 06-27-2007, 07:07 PM   #31
Texas ZJ1
Jeep Jedi Master
 
Texas ZJ1's Avatar
1994 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 20,099
How To: Overhead console install on 93-95 ZJs

Overhead console install for 93-95 Jeep Grand Cherokees (ZJ)
Written by Ewout_vB


First we need to discuss what is needed to install an overhead console into a jeep that did not come with it. You will need the following parts:
• The overhead console, the fabric color is not important as you can always redo the material on there. The console has to be from 93-95, as the other years communicate differently with the car as the 96 and after jeeps have a BCM.
• Mounting bracket with the 2 bolts and 1 screw to hold up the front of the overhead console.
• Wiring--either the complete wiring harness or enough wire to connect the ambient temperature sensor and overhead console with the connector for the overhead console, 100 way connector, and ambient temperature sensor (if you have the ATC – automatic temperature control then you should already have the ambient temp sensor). You can always visit a junkyard to get the connectors or even the whole wiring harness; just make sure to read the notice below about the 2 different versions so that you get the right version.

Wiring the 100-way connector.

If you have the wiring harness for the overhead console, then you need to check whether it really is the correct wiring harness before you plug it in. The wiring gets a little more complicated as I found out with my 95ZJ which had electrical components from a 93ZJ service manual. Under the passenger kick panel there are 2 versions of the “100-way connector”. This is what the “100-way” connector cluster looks like:


There is a wiring harness with a green and red connector. This is from a 94-95 ZJ, however make sure to check as my 95 ZJ didn’t have this layout. Then there is the earlier version that has a black and red connector for the 100-way connector which can be found in the 93 ZJ service manual. The easiest way to check is to look at the black and green connector. If you have a green plug with 1 wire, then you need the “94-95” harness with the green and red plug. If you have a black plug near the top of the cluster with 1 wire, then you need the 93 harness with the black and red plug. Please note that the “year” I’m using to refer to the harness types doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to get it from a jeep from that year, it’s just that they reflect the service manual from those years.

Here is an example:


This is a black plug with only 1 wire, which means that this person needs a 93 wiring harness. This is what my 95 ZJ had.

Here are the important connectors from the 94-95 ZJ for the 100-way connector cluster, **PLEASE NOTE** just because it is from the 95 ZJ service manual DOES NOT mean it will be in your 94-95 ZJ. My 95 ZJ did not have this layout.




__________________
00 4.7 Laredo...stock

94 5.9 Laredo 6.5 RE lift with 35 Maxxis Bighorns
and 33 Bridgestone Duelers
Detroit and true trac
Red Jeep Club Member
REDNECK JCM
Texas Jeep Owner #6
USN Jeep Club #4
http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/
602.841.3355

For your performance needs:

kolak@kolakperformance.com
480.998.3661
Texas ZJ1 is offline  
Unread 06-27-2007, 07:09 PM   #32
Texas ZJ1
Jeep Jedi Master
 
Texas ZJ1's Avatar
1994 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 20,099
Now here are the “same” connectors on the 93 ZJ (please note connector G is black and H is red):



Now if you have the overhead console OEM wiring harness you can go ahead and plug it in if you have the right connector that replaces the one with 1 wire in it. Be sure to connect the single wire that was in the “blank” old harness to the new connector. I believe it’s VT/YL (violet striped yellow) for circuit G71 which is the VTA lift gate key cylinder connection. However, if the connector does not match the blank (1 wire) one in your 100-way connector, then you have to go to a junkyard and get a connector (black or green) that can fit in the correct slot with all the wires in it so you can use it to wire all the needed connections. Just cut off the old connector if needed and solder on the new one. At this point, you should be done with most of the wiring if you already have the wiring harness with the original or new connector that match your vehicle. So if you have the correct wiring harness now you can now just skip to the wiring of the ambient temperature sensor.

If you are making your own wiring harness, you do not have to get the red plug if you already have the keyless entry option, you can instead tap these wires of off the wiring harness of the keyless entry module. If you do not have the keyless entry dome then you have to get the red plug as well so you can have the wire the keyless entry module in the overhead console.

Now here are the pin outs for connectors of the overhead console and keyless entry module. This is the same in every 93-95 as far as I know.


Now just wire it correctly between the connectors and plug it in. As for the length of the wires it’s never a bad idea to have the wires a little too long and trimming it later to the right length.

If you are making your own wiring harness and you already have the keyless entry module present and you do not want to also wire the red connector as it’s already wired up to the above the headliner anyway, then do the following (worked for me):
The only connections that the overhead console does not get from the black/green connector in the 100-way connector (depending on your year) is pin 6-8 on the overhead console connector pinout. These connections in the factory wiring harness are in fact spliced from the red connector before it reaches the overhead console and keyless entry module. In other words you can simply connect to the wires that go to the pins 6 (red striped white), 8 (yellow striped dark green), and 12 (yellow) on the keyless entry module.

Wiring the ambient temperature sensor.

Now we still have 2 wires that are not connected yet. That is pin 9-10 on the overhead console connector. These have to go to the ambient temp sensor. If you do not have the climate control (ATC) then you have to run 2 wires through the firewall to behind the grill, which is where you connect the wires to the ambient temperature sensor. I went to the junkyard to get the connector and then bought a new temperature sensor. I guided the wires from the middle of the ceiling down the right A-pillar to the passenger kick panel. From there I guided them all the way to the driver side where I made a hole in one of the grommets through the firewall and finally guided them to behind the grill where I soldered it to the connector I picked up at the junkyard.

Now for if you have the ATC or climate control. The ATC should send the info via the HEVAC module over the CCD bus that is already connected via the black/green connector from the 100-way connector cluster. Your best bet is to leave the 2 wires on the overhead console disconnected at first and connect the 2 connectors on the overhead and see if it receives any temp information or whether it states OC. If the overhead console states OC (open connection), try to get the connector to plug into the red connector or just cut the connector off and solder it on. Here is a picture of this red connector:

Before you wire the overhead console to this connector, it would be smart to take a multi-meter and see if the resistance makes sense. It should be 336K ohms at -40 Fahrenheit and 2.488K ohms at 140 Fahrenheit, anywhere in between should be good.

Mounting the overhead console.
The mounting bracket should come with 2 bolts. I believe they’re self tapping, but I’m not sure. It has FWD stamped on there – point this forward. This way the bracket only fits behind the bracket for the dome/keyless entry one way. The holes should already be there, but they are really small.

Now you also need a screw to hold the front of the overhead console. Simply get a screw that is long enough so that you can put it in the hole of the overhead console and that it sticks out enough to hold onto the metal but without being crazy long where you might go through the roof. I suggest you take a screw out of the sun visor hold (the little plastic holder) and get a screw that’s the same type but longer).

Cutting the headliner.
I can’t really say much here. I tried getting measurements from people who had overhead consoles but no one was able to help me. I suggest getting a piece of cardboard and cut this first instead of the headliner. Then use this to cut the headliner. I used these 2 pictures as references and always make sure the hole is less wide than the overhead console (thanks Yardman Harry from JeepForum.com).



Good luck!

PS the rumor going around on various boards that you need the right VIC or ATC or even BCM to get the overhead console working is false. The 93-95 ZJs don’t even have a BCM this was added in 96. The VIC only communicates to the metric / US standard button and nothing else. And the ATC also uses this metric/US standards button and sometimes to be used to transmit the temp sensor information via the CCD bus instead of a straight wired connection to the overhead console from the ambient temp sensor behind the grill. You can put an overhead console in any 93-95 jeep, you just have to make sure you connect everything correctly. The only thing that “could” be incompatible might be the PCM I have not seen any different PCMs that are incompatible.

Please notice most of these pictures are not mine, thanks for everyone’s help!
__________________
00 4.7 Laredo...stock

94 5.9 Laredo 6.5 RE lift with 35 Maxxis Bighorns
and 33 Bridgestone Duelers
Detroit and true trac
Red Jeep Club Member
REDNECK JCM
Texas Jeep Owner #6
USN Jeep Club #4
http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/
602.841.3355

For your performance needs:

kolak@kolakperformance.com
480.998.3661
Texas ZJ1 is offline  
Unread 12-13-2007, 05:59 AM   #33
Texas ZJ1
Jeep Jedi Master
 
Texas ZJ1's Avatar
1994 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 20,099
4.0 Engine misfires

Models affected (applies to vehicles equipped with a 4.0L engine):
1999-2001 (XJ) Cherokee;
1999-2004 (WJ) Grand Cherokee (All Markets);
1999-2004 (TJ) Wrangler; and
2001-’04 (WG) Grand Cherokee (International Markets).

The customer may experience an incident of engine misfire during certain vehicle operating conditions. The misfire may occur when the vehicle is operated between 50-70 mph and under light loading conditions, e.g. slight uphill road grades. This condition may occur at all ambient conditions, but is more noticeable when ambient conditions are less than 0° C (32° F).

If the vehicle is OBD equipped, an MIL illumination may also have occurred due to DTC P0300 - Multiple Cylinder Misfire. Various single cylinder misfire DTCs may also be present. If the frequency of misfire is high, the PCM may place the engine in “limp-in” mode.

The misfire condition may be caused by one or more engine exhaust valves that are slow to close. Late closure of an exhaust valve may be the result of no valve rotation and associated buildup of carbon on the exhaust valve stem.

DIAGNOSIS

1. This condition may occur when the engine is not allowed to run at engine rpm that are greater than 3,200 rpm. At 3,200 rpm or higher the engine exhaust valves will rotate if not impeded by high carbon deposits. Low engine rpm and high carbon deposits are associated with short-trip driving where the vehicle engine is not allowed to fully warm to normal engine operating temperatures. Cold ambient temperatures will increase engine warm-up time and add to the opportunity of carbon deposit buildup on the stem of the engine exhaust valve.

2. Verify that an engine misfire condition is present. Use of the DRBIII during a road test, or a Co-Pilot data recording, may help to determine engine misfire and misfire counts. If carbon deposit accumulation is severe, then a cylinder leak down test may detect one or more cylinders leaking greater than 15%. Save any misfire DTC freeze-frame data that was stored for later misfire correction verification.

3. Verify that the engine misfire condition is not caused by faulty engine mechanical or electrical components.

4. If the engine mechanical and electrical systems are operating properly, perform the Repair Procedure.

REPAIR PROCEDURE

Inspection:

1. Raise the vehicle’s hood.

2. Remove the engine valve cover and all six exhaust valve rocker arms (the intake rocker arms are also removed during this step). Refer to the appropriate vehicle service manual for detailed removal instructions. The valve cover gasket is reuseable. Keep each pair of rocker arms matched to their respective valve and cylinder.

3. Inspect the end, or tip, of each exhaust valve stem where it makes contact with the respective rocker arm.

4. Determine if each exhaust valve is rotating within its respective valve guide. An exhaust valve that is rotating will have a “bulls eye” or circular wear pattern on the face of the valve stem tip. If the exhaust valve is not rotating, a straight mark-like pattern will be present across the face of the valve stem tip.

5. If there are exhaust valves that are not rotating, then proceed to the Valve Rotation section of this Repair Procedure.

6. If all exhaust valves are rotating, then this bulletin does not apply and further diagnosis is required. Install the engine rocker arms and valve cover. Refer to the appropriate vehicle service manual for detailed installation instructions.

Valve Rotation:

1. If one or more engine exhaust valves are not rotating, perform the valve rotation procedure to all six exhaust valves.

Note: It’s important that the Valve Rotation section of this repair procedure be performed.

2. Clean and mark the tip of each exhaust valve stem with a paint marker. The paint mark will be used later to assist with determining if the exhaust valve has been rotated 90°.

3. Bring the #1 cylinder piston to top dead center using the mark on the crankshaft front dampener/pulley. This step is important to prevent the possibility of the exhaust valve from falling completely into the cylinder.

4. Install the essential service tool valve spring compressor, MD-998772A, to the #1 cylinder exhaust valve spring.

Note: The following valve rotation procedure was developed with the use of valve spring compressor tool, MD-998772A. The MD-998772A compressor engages the entire perimeter of the valve spring retainer, unlike other make valve spring compressors.

5. Compress the #1 cylinder exhaust valve spring enough to gain access so that the exhaust valve can be rotated 90°. Rotate the exhaust valve 90°. Slowly remove the compression on the exhaust valve spring. Verify that the valve keeper is properly seated to the valve stem and valve spring retainer.

6. The 4.0L firing order is 1 - 5 - 3 - 6 - 2 - 4. Without rotating the engine crankshaft, repeat steps 3 through 5 to cylinder #6.

7. Rotate the engine crankshaft 1200 and repeat steps 3 through 5 to cylinders #5 and #2.

8. Rotate the engine crankshaft another 1200 and repeat steps 3 through 5 to cylinders #3 and #4.

9. Install all cylinder rocker arms (intake and exhausts) and retaining bridge. Make certain that the push rods are properly seated to their respective rocker arm and lifter. Tighten the respective cylinder bridge/rocker arm cap screws to 30 Nm (21 ft.-lbs.) when each cylinder piston is at top dead center (cylinder intake and exhaust valves are closed).

10. Install the engine cylinder head valve cover. Tighten the valve cover bolts to 10 Nm (85 in.-lbs.). Refer to the appropriate vehicle service manual for detailed assembly instructions.

Decarboning Combustion Chamber and Valves:

1. Start the vehicle’s engine and allow the engine to reach normal operating temperature.

2. Remove the air tube from the engine throttle body.

3. With the engine at idle, spray the entire contents of Mopar Combustion Chamber Cleaner, P/N 04318001AB, directly into the throttle body. As the cleaner is being ingested, allow the vehicle to “load up” with the cleaner to the point that the engine is almost stalling out. Maintain this condition until all of the cleaner is used/ingested.

4. Stop the engine once the entire can of cleaner has been ingested.

5. Install the air tube to the throttle body.

6. With the hood closed and the vehicle parked inside the garage, allow the vehicle engine to heat soak for two to three hours. This will ensure that the engine will maintain its temperature and will allow proper solvent penetration.

7. After engine soak, start the engine and drive the vehicle until the engine is has reached normal engine operating temperatures.

8. If the vehicle is equipped with an automatic transmission, place the gear selector into “L” (low). If the vehicle is equipped with a manual transmission, place the transmission into first gear.

9. In a safe vehicle operating location that will allow the vehicle to be driven safely and at the posted speed limit, accelerate the vehicle until the engine reaches 4,500 rpm.

10. Hold the engine speed at this rpm for 15 seconds.

11. Slow down and in a safe location pull to the side of the road. Allow the engine to idle for five seconds.

12. Repeat steps 9 through 11 five more times.

13. With the vehicle at operating temperature and using any available freeze-frame data recorded when the misfire DTC occurred, verify that the misfire condition has been corrected.

14. Erase any engine DTCs once the misfire condition has been corrected.

Technical service bulletin courtesy of Mitchell 1.

For additional information, visit www.mitchell1.com.


Redbob suggested this. Say thanks to him for the find.

Hunter
__________________
00 4.7 Laredo...stock

94 5.9 Laredo 6.5 RE lift with 35 Maxxis Bighorns
and 33 Bridgestone Duelers
Detroit and true trac
Red Jeep Club Member
REDNECK JCM
Texas Jeep Owner #6
USN Jeep Club #4
http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/
602.841.3355

For your performance needs:

kolak@kolakperformance.com
480.998.3661
Texas ZJ1 is offline  
Unread 12-25-2007, 08:52 PM   #34
10achik
I ate what?
 
10achik's Avatar
1999 WJ 
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: STL (IL side)
Posts: 8,341
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaq123
so all the air comes in from the bottom so no mud or water gets in.

do your tranny a favor and do this if you plan to swim in the water a lot

tap 1/8-27 NPT hole on top



tap out the oem vent hole located behind the torque converter and install a 1/8" pipe plug




new vent location:



__________________
Ken

99 GC Limited - 4.7L HO V8, 6.5" IRO HC LA lift, F&R D44s locked & trussed, 242HD, IRO TC Skid, KMA Bumper, 35's
2006 Saturn Redline -2.0L Eaton supercharged I4, GMPP Stage 2, Custom Tune, AEM CAI, Ebiach Pro Kit w/ swaybars, EVO Ventus V12s (13.76 @ 103.85)
2006 Pontiac G6 GTP
2012 Nissan Juke - (hers)
2000 SV650 - naked, integrated tail light, sliders, corbin, pilot roads, RK chain & sprokets, D&D full exhaust, FactoryPro Stage I jet kit, +4 Ignition Advancer, Barnett race clutch
2006 Triumph America 900 - Full Dresser

January 2009 Grand Cherokee of the Month (GCOTM)
10achik is offline  
Unread 01-05-2008, 10:47 AM   #35
Texas ZJ1
Jeep Jedi Master
 
Texas ZJ1's Avatar
1994 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 20,099
I borrowed this from another website

Everything you need to know to lift your WJ... components, tires, & bs

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This thread is to answer most of your questions regarding which parts are and are not necessary for a lift kit on a WJ (Jeep Grand Cherokee 1999-2004) as well as clarifying the many "will if fit" questions in regards to lift height, tire sizes, and the backspacing on your wheels. This thread is NOT for discussing which company makes the best lift kit at 3" or 4" or if you should get 3" coils versus UC springs and BB. Here you will find most of the pertinent information necessary to decipher what parts you need to buy in order to safely lift your jeep to your desired height. Suggested tire sizes and back spacing in respect to lift height is also addressed at the bottom of the page. Please keep in mind this information is specific for WJs (Jeep Grand Cherokees 1999-2004) and not your mom's Liberty or your uncle's ZJ.

Below are the parts that are recommended or required to lift a WJ to the specified height. "No" means the part is not required, "Yes" means that the part is necessary to lift to the specified height, and "Recommended" is, well... recommended for a better/more comfortable ride or may be necessary based on your individual preference. A description of each part can be found below the chart.



1. Sway bar links (front): the sway bar links in the front should be long enough so that the angle of the sides of the sway bar where it attaches to the links should form a 25-35 degree angle with the an imaginary line running parallel to the ground. For those of you that think you will be taking your vehicle off-road, JKS quick or quicker disconnects are recommended as they allow you to easily disconnect your sway bar, allowing the front axle more articulation to help overcome more difficult terrain.

2. Sway bar links (rear): the sway bar links in the rear should be long enough so that the angle of the sides of the sway bar where it attaches to the links should form a 0-10 degree angle with an imaginary line running parallel to the ground.

3. Track bar: the correct length of the track bar is the length from the upper and lower track bar mounts while the jeep is sitting on level ground after the installation of the lift kit. You should not have to manipulate the length from upper and lower track bar mounts by jacking up the suspension or body parts to shorten or lengthen the distance between the two mounts to make the track bar fit.

4. Shocks: shock length should be based on the size of your lift. Incorrect length of shocks will affect your overall ride quality and limit your flexibility in off camber situations, by limiting your length of up and down travel. A soft shock will ride nicely on the highway but will suffer in performance off road, where as a stiffer shock will have the opposite affect. A high quality shock can easily cost over $100 a piece while a cheaper shock simply used for DD can be found for $30.

5. Drop transfer case kit: a drop transfer case kit usually lowers your transfer case 1” (depends on manufacturer) by placing metal spacers in-between your transfer case cross member and the body of the vehicle. This helps to alleviate stress placed upon your pinion, drive shafts, and transfer case due to the increased angles of the driveline after lifting the suspension. Typically you can make it to around 4” of lift before considering dropping your transfer case. Another way to alleviate stress from the driveline is with a double cardan driveshaft (02-04 come from the factory with a double cardan driveshaft) as it adjusts to the steeper angle created after lifting the vehicle. As with any size lift, there will be increased stress on driveline components.

6-8. Control arms (for our purposes, 6-8 reference “short arms”, and are simply a longer version of the stock control arm. “Short arms” utilize the stock mounting locations on the body for your new, longer, “short arms”): as you increase the size of your springs and/or add spacers on top of your springs, the axles will start to sweep in towards the center of the vehicle as the length of your control arms determine where the axle will be placed in relation to the center of the wheel well. Longer front and rear control arms (short arms) will help push your axle back away from the center of the vehicle and back to the center of your wheel wells. Stock control arms are effective up to around 4” of lift, after which it is wise to upgrade to “short arms” or “long arms”.

9-10. Long arms (for our purposes, 9-10 reference “long arms”, and simply mean that the stock mounting locations on the body for the control arms are no longer used, and instead a new mounting bracket must either be welded or bolted to the body to serve as a new point of attachment for the long arms): long arms via the new attachment points greatly reduce body roll as they offer an amazing amount of stability and ride comfort. Long arms also serve to correct the geometry of suspension components. A front long arm upgrade will make driving a dream at any lift greater than 4.5”, and is highly recommended once you come close to the 5” or 5.5” mark. You may be able to scoot around upgrading to rear long arms when you are close to 6” of lift, but your ride quality will be much improved with the rear long arm upgrade. The rear long arm upgrade also does away with the jeeps A-arm, the triangular shaped bracket that secures to the top side of the axle and the underside of the vehicle. A rear long arm upgrade typically will require your exhaust system to be modified as the new attachment points and control arms will interfere with the stock routing of the exhaust.

11. A-arm spacer: this block of metal squeezes in-between the a-arm and the pumpkin on the axle. It allows more movement and flexibility in the rear axle and is suggested for lift heights just below 4” and all the way up to 6” or greater when used in conjunction with adjustable rear LCAs. An a-arm spacer is not needed when using rear long arms, as the a-arm is removed completely.

12. Steering stabilizer: a lift increases the pressure on steering components which are often too much for the wimpy stock SS. A high quality SS reduces the looseness of your steering wheel by preventing your wheel from jumping around as much.

13. Sway bar (rear): lowered vehicles feel tighter in turns because their center of gravity is lower; well once you lift your jeep you’ll feel more like a school bus going around turns. A bigger diameter sway bar offers more resistance as the jeep leans during a turn as well as helps to cure rear bump steer (tail wag).

One additional item to think about buying while you have your jeep torn apart are extended bumpstops as these will limit the travel of the axle towards the underside of the jeep, preventing your rotating tire from ripping the plastic out of your wheel well, and may also save your windshield washer fluid reservoir!


Below are common conversions for a 16x7" and 17x7" wheel and the suggested backspacing each tire size at various ride heights. For reference, stock wheels that measure 16x7 have 6” of backspacing, while 17x7.5 wheels have 6.25” backspacing.

*Heavy duty tie rods and drag links are recommended when moving into the 32" size tire and larger size tire.


Backspacing is important as it moves your rotating tire away from components that like to remain fixed. The front lower control arms and the rear shocks are often the items that become abused when backspacing is insufficient on larger diameter tires. Now a 16x7” wheel with 4” backspacing may sound like a full inch more backspacing than a 16x8” wheel with 5” backspacing, however due to the extra inch in width of the 8” wheel, it relocates the tire a half an inch. In essence, the difference between 4” bs on 7” width wheel vs 5” bs on 8” width is really only ½”. The diagram below illustrates how wheel width and backspacing effects where your tires are position. Each tire/wheel combo below is aligned at a fixed point to better reference the distance between the tire and the shock, and how much farther the tire has been pushed outside of the fender. I apologize for the pixilated picture as I am not very artistic. The picture is in the perspective of you standing behind your jeep looking at your driverside rear tire with your Superman vision so you can see through the outside layer of rubber and see the cross section of the rim and where it bolts on to the axle. The “Gained Fender Clearance over Stock 245 Tire” column does not mean that the value in the column represents how far the tire will stick out of the fender, but rather shows how far the tire has been displaced in the wheel well in comparison with a 245 tire. The measurement from tire to the shock is fairly accurate but obviously some shocks are much wider in diameter than others, and this is the measurement you should expect to see while the jeep is stationary on level ground. You should expect that distance to fluctuate while driving. I noticed while running a set of hydro shocks which were slightly larger than previous sized shocks, with a set of 245/75/16 Revos on stock rims, that when stationary I could barely fit my finger between the shock tube and the tire. Although there was evidence as to the tire rubbing on the shock via black rubber marks, supporting the fact that stationary clearance is not the same as clearance during transit. To examine backspacing in relation to tire width and lateral displacement, the height of the tire is irrelevant; the only thing the diagram is concerned with is tire width, wheel width, backspacing, the corresponding distance between the rear shock and the tire, and an estimated distance of how far the tire has moved outward in comparison with a typical 245 width tire.




Performance and city gas mileage will obviously suffer with larger diameter and heavier rims/tires. The chart below was found at 4lo.com is their computations and represents their work. This chart illustrates how your gas mileage will be affected by your tire size and gear ratio. The table can be used to get a rough idea on gear ratios (again, this chart is NOT specific to the WJ, but rather serves as an illustration). The colors represent ideal RPM's at highway speeds (65) for a given vehicle (not a WJ, I say again, NOT A WJ). For highway cruising and best fuel economy stay towards the yellow (2600 rpm), around town daily driving is color coded green (2800 rpm), and for better towing power or just more 4-low power use the ratios near the red (3100 rpm). In layman terms, if you run 30” tires and 3.73 gears, at 65 mph you generate 2715 RPM according to this chart. If you get some new rubbers in a size 33”, your new RPM at 65 mph is now 2469. It takes less RPMs to run a bigger tire than a smaller tire, but consequently your acceleration and power have dropped significantly. Therefore, to get that lost power back and maximum efficiency, you want to find what size gears is going to make your jeep perform like it did when you first bought it. So ideally with your new 33” tires you want to buy new gears that make you your 65mph highway RPM close to what it was at stock. To do this you walk your eyes down the 33” tire row to where you find a RPM that is close to 2715, in this case a set of 4.11 gears makes your RPM 2720.



For a more precise method, you can use the gear ratio calculator, which is the second calculator from the top found at http://www.4lo.com/4LoCalc.htm. Input your stock tire and gear settings (3.55 or 3.73), then input your new tire size and you can see what your recommended gear would be.


As you can see, life is simple prior to and around 4". However around the 4" mark things will start to get tricky and slightly more complicated. As more parts are needed to upgrade to and above 4", you will see the cost rise exponentially. You will see diminished ride quality on stock control arms. Upgrading to longer/adjustable control arms in the front and the rear and the addition of an a-arm spacer will increase the ride quality, while relocating the control arms via new mounting brackets and long arms will provide the best ride quality. A new and/or longer double cardan driveshaft may also be necessary to reduce driveline vibrations. Determine your goals for your jeep prior to lifting, and don't ever attempt to lift your jeep when money is tight. You best bet is to save up until you can build your rig the way you want it. Buying a 2" BB and a new set of tires right away based on your available funds and then upgrading 6 months later to what you really wanted just leaves you with a couple hundred dollars less than you would have had and an extra set of tires in your garage that are in great condition, yet are too small for your new height. Do it right the first time and you won't end up with an extra set of shocks, tires, control arms and sway bar links taking up space in your garage. Good luck, and the "Search" button at the top is your friend!
__________________
00 4.7 Laredo...stock

94 5.9 Laredo 6.5 RE lift with 35 Maxxis Bighorns
and 33 Bridgestone Duelers
Detroit and true trac
Red Jeep Club Member
REDNECK JCM
Texas Jeep Owner #6
USN Jeep Club #4
http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/
602.841.3355

For your performance needs:

kolak@kolakperformance.com
480.998.3661
Texas ZJ1 is offline  
Unread 01-21-2008, 08:06 PM   #36
ArloGuthroJeep
Mr. Hyde!
 
ArloGuthroJeep's Avatar
2004 WJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 23,081
WJ NP247-->NP242 Swap - FAQ - HOWTO
http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f310/jeep-wj-247-242hd-swap-510546/

Oxygen Sensors (O2 Sensors) Information:
http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f13/oxygen-sensors-more-info-than-you-probably-want-508460/

How to fix the Clogged AC Drain:
http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f13/repairing-clogged-ac-drain-501895-post4647950/

Gear Table & Calculator:
http://www.4lo.com/calc/geartable.htm
__________________
'04 WJ, 6" Clayton LA's, 242 SYE, 35" BFG MT KM2's, 4.56 gears, & D44a locked
'14 WK2 Limited w/5.7L, ORAI, & Tow Package
ArloGuthroJeep is offline  
Unread 01-21-2008, 09:51 PM   #37
10achik
I ate what?
 
10achik's Avatar
1999 WJ 
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: STL (IL side)
Posts: 8,341
WJ 247 -> 242HD Swap

Submitted by Nierace

1999-04 Jeep Grand Cherokee WJ Quadra-Trac/Quadra-Drive to Selec-Trac
(NP247 -> NP242HD)

Additional information: http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f13/2...-posts-957163/



Parts needed:

242HD (Only found in 2002-03 V8 grand Cherokees with Selec-Trac)
Matching drive shaft out of a 2002-03 V8 WJ with Selec-Trac
2 quarts of ATF +4

Optional:
Shifter assembly from a WJ with Selec-Trac
Mopar Part number: 52109671AB

If you have a 1999-2001 WJ, you might have a CV joint at the transfer case instead of a u-joint. In this case you will need to also find a donor shaft out of a 02+ V8 Grand Cherokee, or swap your old output to the new transfer case. The u-joint setup is much better and highly recommended however.


Tools needed:

1/4” Ratchet set
Short 1/4“ extension
14mm or 9/16” deep socket
14mm or 9/16” regular socket
14mm or 9/16” wrench (ratcheting wrench highly recommended)
12mm regular socket
8mm regular socket
10mm Allen key
Pliers
Slotted screw driver
Lock-tite
Oil bucket
Floor jack
Jack stands (optional)



NP247 Removal:

1.) Depending on the rig you are working on you may or may not want to put it on jack stands.
a. If you have a 4” lift you will have enough room to work underneath on level ground, if not I would recommend putting it on stands.
b. Putting it on stands will also make it easier to take off the drive shafts.

2.) Once on stands and you have a transfer case skid plate, you will need to remove it. The stock one uses 3 bolts on the cross member, and 2 on the unibody.

3.) You will now need to drain the transfer case fluid.
a. Place your oil bucket below the drain plug.
b. Using a 10mm Allen key remove the fill and drain plugs.
c. Clean them and put them some where safe.

Diagram 1.1:


4.) While the transfer case drains remove the rear drive shaft.
a. Using a 1/4“ ratchet, extension and 8mm socket, remove the bolts and the straps on the universal joint at the differential end of the rear drive shaft. Place them in a safe place.
b. Use a mallet if needed to knock the u-joint out of the yoke on the rear differential.
c. Once freed pull the drive shaft out of the slip yoke end of the transfer case. Place some where safe, though it will not be re-used.

5.) Remove the front drive shaft.
a. Using a 1/4“ ratchet and 12mm regular socket remove the bolts from the front output of the transfer case to the drive shaft.
b. Use a mallet if needed to knock the u-joint out of the yoke at the transfer case.
c. Once free you can rest the drive shaft on the cross member as you will be re-using it.

Diagram 1.2:



6.) Lower the cross member so that you have room to work.
a. Use a floor jack to support the center of the cross member, jack it up so there is some pressure on the floor jack.
b. Remove the bolts.
- Use 15mm socket on the bolts.
- I have Claytons LA’s, so I use 14mm sock and wrench.
- Place the bolts/nuts in a safe location.
c. Carefully Lower the cross member 1-2” ***Do not drop it lower***

Diagram 1.3:


7.) Remove shifter lever cable and bracket.
a. Pop the cable end off of the lever at the transfer case, you should be able to use your hands, if not use a slotted screw driver to pry it off.
b. Using 14mm socket remove 3 bolts located on driver side on the transmission. (Diagram 1.4)
c. Using a large wrench, put the bottom jaw on the bottom of the bracket, then the top jaw on the lip of the spring clamp holding the cable in the bracket. Apply pressure and it will pop right off. (Diagram 1.5)
d. Put the cable through the bottom hole, then put the spring clamp back on.

Diagram 1.4:


Diagram 1.5 - In original position:


Diagram 1.6 – In new position:


8.) Remove transfer case nuts.
a. Clean off the showing thread and soak in penetrating oil or WD40.
b. Use a combination of the 14mm deep socket, regular socket and ratcheting wrench.
c. The reason you will need the short sockets is there is not much room once you start to unthread the nuts on some of them. So you need to swap out or it will get stuck and you wont be able to get the wrench/socket out.
d. Be very patient as you will be doing a lot of 1 click ratcheting.
e. Clean the nuts thoroughly.

9.) Once the bolts are out, remove the transfer case. Having another person would be helpful, it weighs 80lbs so you should be able to manage it on your own. Place in a safe place.
a. Check your transmission output seal and replace if needed.
b. Check your breather tube to make sure its not split, if it is, cut off the split section and connect a new piece.

Diagram 1.7:



NP242HD Installation:

1.) Lift up and line up the 242HD with the bolt holes in the transmission mount.
a. You may need to rotate the input of the transfer case to line up with the transmission for it to slide in.
b. Once all the way in, it will be able to support its on weight.
c. Put the transfer case nuts back on, and use anti-seize.

2.) Once the transfer case is in position, bolt the shifter cable bracket back up.
a. Reinstall the 3 14mm bolts.
b. Clip the end of the cable onto the transfer case shifter, you may need to use a pair of pliers to pop it on.

3.) Bolt the cross member back up. Torque the 15mm bolts to 30-34ft lbs

4.) Reconnect the front drive shaft. Apply lock tite on the 12mm bolts then tighten.

5.) Connect the new rear drive shaft.
a. Slide the transfer case end into the slip yoke. You may need to rotate it so the splines match up.
b. Place the differential end back in the yoke, put the u-joint straps on, apply lock-tite to the 8mm bolt then tighten.

6.) Drain any remaining oil in the NP242HD.
a. Place your oil bucket below the drain plug.
b. Using a 10mm Allen key remove the fill and drain plugs.
c. Let what ever is in it drain out, then reinstall the drain plug.
d. Now use 2 quarts of ATF+4 to fill the transfer case.
e. Reinstall the fill plug

Diagram 1.8:



7.) Reinstall skid plate.

8.) Remove jack stands.


Notes:

I used a sticker instead of switching out the shifter assembly, since you can use your old one without a problem.

Expect to spend approximately 4-8 hrs to complete this swap.
__________________
Ken

99 GC Limited - 4.7L HO V8, 6.5" IRO HC LA lift, F&R D44s locked & trussed, 242HD, IRO TC Skid, KMA Bumper, 35's
2006 Saturn Redline -2.0L Eaton supercharged I4, GMPP Stage 2, Custom Tune, AEM CAI, Ebiach Pro Kit w/ swaybars, EVO Ventus V12s (13.76 @ 103.85)
2006 Pontiac G6 GTP
2012 Nissan Juke - (hers)
2000 SV650 - naked, integrated tail light, sliders, corbin, pilot roads, RK chain & sprokets, D&D full exhaust, FactoryPro Stage I jet kit, +4 Ignition Advancer, Barnett race clutch
2006 Triumph America 900 - Full Dresser

January 2009 Grand Cherokee of the Month (GCOTM)
10achik is offline  
Unread 02-22-2008, 12:13 PM   #38
ArloGuthroJeep
Mr. Hyde!
 
ArloGuthroJeep's Avatar
2004 WJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 23,081
D35 & TrueTrac - http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f13/there-truetrac-fitment-dana-35c-517770/
__________________
'04 WJ, 6" Clayton LA's, 242 SYE, 35" BFG MT KM2's, 4.56 gears, & D44a locked
'14 WK2 Limited w/5.7L, ORAI, & Tow Package
ArloGuthroJeep is offline  
Unread 03-01-2008, 10:47 AM   #39
Texas ZJ1
Jeep Jedi Master
 
Texas ZJ1's Avatar
1994 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 20,099
Replacing lift gate struts by Jimmer.

How To Replace Lift-gate Struts

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I replaced the lift-gate struts on my 1998 GC yesterday. It was a very easy 15-minute job.

I used Mopar genuine parts. On the parts packages, the lift-gate struts are called “LIFTGATE SUPPORTS”. Since there are left and right parts, the part numbers are G0004856AC and G0004857AC. They cost $36.10 each plus tax at the dealership. There are instructions on the back of the packages, but I didn’t notice them until just now.

The bolts on the top of the support use a T-8 External Torx socket. I had trouble finding a set of these in my town, but I did find them at NAPA for about $20. They are ¼” drive and I used a 3” extension on my wrench.

I used a push broom to prop up the lift-gate while I removed the first strut. Something a little longer, such as a 2X4 or stepladder, might have been better to use. You will want to lift up on the gate a little to remove the tension on the bolts as you are removing them.

After the top bolts are removed, use a little screwdriver to pry the ball connector clip out about a ¼” to release the bottom of the strut from the ball connector on the vehicle.

For installing the new strut, I put the bolts in on the top of the strut first (to keep the tension off of the bolts). In retrospect, I think I should have disconnected the ball connector first when I removed the old one, to help relieve the tension off the bolts. If you don’t get the tension off the bolts, there is a possibility of cross-threading them. You don’t even want to cross-thread the bolts! After getting the bolts in, just pry the clip out about ¼” on the ball connector and press it on to the ball.

I thought that one new strut would hold up the lift-gate adequately while I removed and replaced the other side. This didn’t work for me, so I had to again use the push broom handle to keep the lift-gate up.

The great result is that the lift-gate actually goes up automatically after opening it about halfway! It is now working just like it did when it was new. I wish I had done this about three years ago.


Thanks Jimmer for the write up.

Hunter
__________________
00 4.7 Laredo...stock

94 5.9 Laredo 6.5 RE lift with 35 Maxxis Bighorns
and 33 Bridgestone Duelers
Detroit and true trac
Red Jeep Club Member
REDNECK JCM
Texas Jeep Owner #6
USN Jeep Club #4
http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/
602.841.3355

For your performance needs:

kolak@kolakperformance.com
480.998.3661
Texas ZJ1 is offline  
Unread 03-27-2008, 03:37 PM   #40
ArloGuthroJeep
Mr. Hyde!
 
ArloGuthroJeep's Avatar
2004 WJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 23,081
Quote:
Originally Posted by WJChris
If you are experiencing electrical "gremlins" like your dash lights are flickering, and your Jeep doesn’t start, but magically will a moment later....

SECURE YOUR BATTERY CABLES!

Here is how to MAKE SURE it’s on there good:

Remove Negative cable. Remove Positive cable.

Take positive cable, loosen the nut all the way out and with a large flat blade screwdriver, carefully pry the ends of the "clamp" apart to open it up wide. Next, seat the "clamp" back onto the battery post, twisting back and forth as you push down. Hold the "clamp" down onto the BASE of the post while tightening it to the post.

Repeat for negative cable.

The reason for all this is due to the batteries posts being conical and is wider at the base. This will ensure a solid connection, everytime!
__________________
'04 WJ, 6" Clayton LA's, 242 SYE, 35" BFG MT KM2's, 4.56 gears, & D44a locked
'14 WK2 Limited w/5.7L, ORAI, & Tow Package
ArloGuthroJeep is offline  
Unread 04-15-2008, 12:39 PM   #41
Texas ZJ1
Jeep Jedi Master
 
Texas ZJ1's Avatar
1994 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 20,099
WJ Lift Combos

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks to Krupples26 for putting this together

This thread is to answer most of your questions regarding which parts are and are not necessary for a lift kit on a WJ (Jeep Grand Cherokee 1999-2004) as well as clarifying the many "will it fit" questions in regards to lift height, tire sizes, and the backspacing on your wheels. This thread is NOT for discussing which company makes the best lift kit at 3" or 4" or if you should get 3" coils versus UC springs and BB. Here you will find most of the pertinent information necessary to decipher what parts you need to buy in order to safely lift your jeep to your desired height. Suggested tire sizes and back spacing in respect to lift height is also addressed at the bottom of the page. Please keep in mind this information is specific for WJs (Jeep Grand Cherokees 1999-2004) and not your mom's Liberty or your uncle's ZJ.

Below are the parts that are recommended or required to lift a WJ to the specified height. "No" means the part is not required, "Yes" means that the part is necessary to lift to the specified height, and "Recommended" is, well... recommended for a better/more comfortable ride or may be necessary based on your individual preference. A description of each part can be found below the chart.



1. Sway bar links (front): the sway bar links in the front should be long enough so that the angle of the sides of the sway bar where it attaches to the links should form a 25-35 degree angle with the an imaginary line running parallel to the ground. For those of you that think you will be taking your vehicle off-road, JKS quick or quicker disconnects are recommended as they allow you to easily disconnect your sway bar, allowing the front axle more articulation to help overcome more difficult terrain.

2. Sway bar links (rear): the sway bar links in the rear should be long enough so that the angle of the sides of the sway bar where it attaches to the links should form a 0-10 degree angle with an imaginary line running parallel to the ground.

3. Track bar: the correct length of the track bar is the length from the upper and lower track bar mounts while the jeep is sitting on level ground after the installation of the lift kit. You should not have to manipulate the length from upper and lower track bar mounts by jacking up the suspension or body parts to shorten or lengthen the distance between the two mounts to make the track bar fit.

4. Shocks: shock length should be based on the size of your lift. Incorrect length of shocks will affect your overall ride quality and limit your flexibility in off camber situations, by limiting your length of up and down travel. A soft shock will ride nicely on the highway but will suffer in performance off road, where as a stiffer shock will have the opposite affect. A high quality shock can easily cost over $100 a piece while a cheaper shock simply used for DD can be found for $30.

5. Drop transfer case kit: a drop transfer case kit usually lowers your transfer case 1” (depends on manufacturer) by placing metal spacers in-between your transfer case cross member and the body of the vehicle. This helps to alleviate stress placed upon your pinion, drive shafts, and transfer case due to the increased angles of the driveline after lifting the suspension. Typically you can make it to around 4” of lift before considering dropping your transfer case. Another way to alleviate stress from the driveline is with a double cardan driveshaft (02-04 come from the factory with a double cardan driveshaft) as it adjusts to the steeper angle created after lifting the vehicle. As with any size lift, there will be increased stress on driveline components.

6-8. Control arms (for our purposes, 6-8 reference “short arms”, and are simply a longer version of the stock control arm. “Short arms” utilize the stock mounting locations on the body for your new, longer, “short arms”): as you increase the size of your springs and/or add spacers on top of your springs, the axles will start to sweep in towards the center of the vehicle as the length of your control arms determine where the axle will be placed in relation to the center of the wheel well. Longer front and rear control arms (short arms) will help push your axle back away from the center of the vehicle and back to the center of your wheel wells. Stock control arms are effective up to around 4” of lift, after which it is wise to upgrade to “short arms” or “long arms”.

9-10. Long arms (for our purposes, 9-10 reference “long arms”, and simply mean that the stock mounting locations on the body for the control arms are no longer used, and instead a new mounting bracket must either be welded or bolted to the body to serve as a new point of attachment for the long arms): long arms via the new attachment points greatly reduce body roll as they offer an amazing amount of stability and ride comfort. Long arms also serve to correct the geometry of suspension components. A front long arm upgrade will make driving a dream at any lift greater than 4.5”, and is highly recommended once you come close to the 5” or 5.5” mark. You may be able to scoot around upgrading to rear long arms when you are close to 6” of lift, but your ride quality will be much improved with the rear long arm upgrade. The rear long arm upgrade also does away with the jeeps A-arm, the triangular shaped bracket that secures to the top side of the axle and the underside of the vehicle. A rear long arm upgrade typically will require your exhaust system to be modified as the new attachment points and control arms will interfere with the stock routing of the exhaust.

11. A-arm spacer: this block of metal squeezes in-between the a-arm and the pumpkin on the axle. It allows more movement and flexibility in the rear axle and is suggested for lift heights just below 4” and all the way up to 6” or greater when used in conjunction with adjustable rear LCAs. An a-arm spacer is not needed when using rear long arms, as the a-arm is removed completely.

12. Steering stabilizer: a lift increases the pressure on steering components which are often too much for the wimpy stock SS. A high quality SS reduces the looseness of your steering wheel by preventing your wheel from jumping around as much.

13. Sway bar (rear): lowered vehicles feel tighter in turns because their center of gravity is lower; well once you lift your jeep you’ll feel more like a school bus going around turns. A bigger diameter sway bar offers more resistance as the jeep leans during a turn as well as helps to cure rear bump steer (tail wag).

One additional item to think about buying while you have your jeep torn apart are extended bumpstops as these will limit the travel of the axle towards the underside of the jeep, preventing your rotating tire from ripping the plastic out of your wheel well, and may also save your windshield washer fluid reservoir!


Below are common conversions for a 16x7" and 17x7" wheel and the suggested backspacing each tire size at various ride heights. For reference, stock wheels that measure 16x7 have 6” of backspacing, while 17x7.5 wheels have 6.25” backspacing.



*Heavy duty tie rods and drag links are recommended when moving into the 32" size tire and larger size tire.


Backspacing is important as it moves your rotating tire away from components that like to remain fixed. The front lower control arms and the rear shocks are often the items that become abused when backspacing is insufficient on larger diameter tires. Now a 16x7” wheel with 4” backspacing may sound like a full inch more backspacing than a 16x8” wheel with 5” backspacing, however due to the extra inch in width of the 8” wheel, it relocates the tire a half an inch. In essence, the difference between 4” bs on 7” width wheel vs 5” bs on 8” width is really only ½”. The diagram below illustrates how wheel width and backspacing effects where your tires are position. Each tire/wheel combo below is aligned at a fixed point to better reference the distance between the tire and the shock, and how much farther the tire has been pushed outside of the fender. I apologize for the pixilated picture as I am not very artistic. The picture is in the perspective of you standing behind your jeep looking at your driverside rear tire with your Superman vision so you can see through the outside layer of rubber and see the cross section of the rim and where it bolts on to the axle. The “Gained Fender Clearance over Stock 245 Tire” column does not mean that the value in the column represents how far the tire will stick out of the fender, but rather shows how far the tire has been displaced in the wheel well in comparison with a 245 tire. The measurement from tire to the shock is fairly accurate but obviously some shocks are much wider in diameter than others, and this is the measurement you should expect to see while the jeep is stationary on level ground. You should expect that distance to fluctuate while driving. I noticed while running a set of hydro shocks which were slightly larger than previous sized shocks, with a set of 245/75/16 Revos on stock rims, that when stationary I could barely fit my finger between the shock tube and the tire. Although there was evidence as to the tire rubbing on the shock via black rubber marks, supporting the fact that stationary clearance is not the same as clearance during transit. To examine backspacing in relation to tire width and lateral displacement, the height of the tire is irrelevant; the only thing the diagram is concerned with is tire width, wheel width, backspacing, the corresponding distance between the rear shock and the tire, and an estimated distance of how far the tire has moved outward in comparison with a typical 245 width tire.




Performance and city gas mileage will obviously suffer with larger diameter and heavier rims/tires. The chart below was found at 4lo.com is their computations and represents their work. This chart illustrates how your gas mileage will be affected by your tire size and gear ratio. The table can be used to get a rough idea on gear ratios (again, this chart is NOT specific to the WJ, but rather serves as an illustration). The colors represent ideal RPM's at highway speeds (65) for a given vehicle (not a WJ, I say again, NOT A WJ). For highway cruising and best fuel economy stay towards the yellow (2600 rpm), around town daily driving is color coded green (2800 rpm), and for better towing power or just more 4-low power use the ratios near the red (3100 rpm). In layman terms, if you run 30” tires and 3.73 gears, at 65 mph you generate 2715 RPM according to this chart. If you get some new rubbers in a size 33”, your new RPM at 65 mph is now 2469. It takes less RPMs to run a bigger tire than a smaller tire, but consequently your acceleration and power have dropped significantly. Therefore, to get that lost power back and maximum efficiency, you want to find what size gears is going to make your jeep perform like it did when you first bought it. So ideally with your new 33” tires you want to buy new gears that make you your 65mph highway RPM close to what it was at stock. To do this you walk your eyes down the 33” tire row to where you find a RPM that is close to 2715, in this case a set of 4.11 gears makes your RPM 2720.



For a more precise method, you can use the gear ratio calculator, which is the second calculator from the top found at http://www.4lo.com/4LoCalc.htm. Input your stock tire and gear settings (3.55 or 3.73), then input your new tire size and you can see what your recommended gear would be.


As you can see, life is simple prior to and around 4". However around the 4" mark things will start to get tricky and slightly more complicated. As more parts are needed to upgrade to and above 4", you will see the cost rise exponentially. You will see diminished ride quality on stock control arms. Upgrading to longer/adjustable control arms in the front and the rear and the addition of an a-arm spacer will increase the ride quality, while relocating the control arms via new mounting brackets and long arms will provide the best ride quality. A new and/or longer double cardan driveshaft may also be necessary to reduce driveline vibrations. Determine your goals for your jeep prior to lifting, and don't ever attempt to lift your jeep when money is tight. You best bet is to save up until you can build your rig the way you want it. Buying a 2" BB and a new set of tires right away based on your available funds and then upgrading 6 months later to what you really wanted just leaves you with a couple hundred dollars less than you would have had and an extra set of tires in your garage that are in great condition, yet are too small for your new height. Do it right the first time and you won't end up with an extra set of shocks, tires, control arms and sway bar links taking up space in your garage. Good luck, and the "Search" button at the top is your friend!


Helpful/suggested readings:
http://www.wjjeeps.com for everything you need to know about the WJ
http://www.4crawler.com/4x4/CheapTri...line-101.shtml answers and explanations of driveshafts and anything driveline related (pinion angles too!)
http://www.4lo.com a great compilation of tons of calculators


Disclaimer: if you feel that any of the information above is inaccurate in any way, or if you would like to add or see something added, please PM me with what you perceive to be incorrect and what you would like changed, or with what you would like to add or see added, and I will make the corresponding amendments as necessary. This post will be updated as needed. Thank you.

Thanks to Krupples26 for putting this together
__________________
00 4.7 Laredo...stock

94 5.9 Laredo 6.5 RE lift with 35 Maxxis Bighorns
and 33 Bridgestone Duelers
Detroit and true trac
Red Jeep Club Member
REDNECK JCM
Texas Jeep Owner #6
USN Jeep Club #4
http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/
602.841.3355

For your performance needs:

kolak@kolakperformance.com
480.998.3661
Texas ZJ1 is offline  
Unread 05-13-2008, 10:23 AM   #42
ArloGuthroJeep
Mr. Hyde!
 
ArloGuthroJeep's Avatar
2004 WJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Boulder, CO
Posts: 23,081
How-To replace WJ Radiator: http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f310/wj-radiator-replacement-write-up-w-pics-530365/
__________________
'04 WJ, 6" Clayton LA's, 242 SYE, 35" BFG MT KM2's, 4.56 gears, & D44a locked
'14 WK2 Limited w/5.7L, ORAI, & Tow Package
ArloGuthroJeep is offline  
Unread 08-07-2008, 10:24 PM   #43
moparrr07
Registered User
1998 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: belvidere, Illinois
Posts: 772
your asking yourself: do i have the up country package?

Up Country ZJ

there has been allot of questions of people wondering whether or not their zj has the up country package, well I was one of the lucky few who got a zj equipped with it

The only TRUE way to discover if your zj came with the package from the factory is to go to your dealership and ask them for a build sheet for your vehicle the code for the up country package is AWE, on a 16 year old vehicle, someone could have taken off parts or added parts

'93-'95 available on both limited and Laredos
'96 available on the Laredo model only
'97-'98 available on both limited and Laredo
'95-'97 standard on all orvis models
'98 not available on 5.9 limited

the first thing you get with the package is slightly taller and stiffer springs, they are said to be about 1" but by now most have sagged, mine are around 3/4" all the way around

the second thing you get with the upcountry pack is upgraded shocks, they are made by Sachs-Boge (made in Schweinfurt Germany), these shocks are uniquely mounted upside-down with the tube end up and rod end (boot) down they are mounted this way to help reduce unsprung weight, they are high pressure monotube gas charged shocks, from '93 through '96 the shocks were painted with standard blue paint, in '97 and '98 they used a new 5 stage black paint which was more resistance to salt spray, this was because the shocks are so visible on the zjs

Here are the original shocks combined with my 2 inch shock spacers I made to go with my 2 inch budget boost spacers, I choose to make shock spacers because I liked the UC shocks so much

rear


front


Along with the taller springs, you get aluminum bumpstop spacers front and rear, they aren’t quite an inch high but you can identify them because they don’t have any rust on them

front


rear


Even though you could get them without the UC package, all UC packages came with tow hooks and skid plates,



The skid plates you got were under the front of the engine



And a transfer case skid plate



You lose some ground clearance because there is a lot more metal hanging underneath the t-case, but this way you don’t drag it over everything



The last and most important part of the whole package is the sticker that you get with the package, It goes in the rearmost driver side window



Somebody removed my sticker somewhere down the road but it looks like this



I would love to get a hold of one, but they cost way too much, with my dealership discount, they still cost around $75 for one sticker, there is a box with around 100 of them sitting in a warehouse in Milwaukee and they will be there until the end of time

if a mod could sticky this or add it to the faqs that would be great!
__________________
-Black Limited 1998 Jeep ZJ 5.2 nv3550 np242, 35s, lots of other stuff
moparrr07 is offline  
Unread 08-18-2008, 04:44 PM   #44
CLNinja
Registered User
1993 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Denver, CO
Posts: 6,975
can someone please put this in the FAQ section?


__________________
[color="#003300"]Matt[/COLOR]
[color="white"][CENTER][size="1"]
[url="http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=434081"][color="white"]Click Here For My Build Thread[/COLOR][/url]
[/COLOR][/SIZE][B]**September 2009 Grand Cherokee Of The Month**[/B]
[SIZE="2"][url="http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=123"][color="white"]Colorado Jeep Club Member #88[/COLOR][/url][/SIZE][/CENTER]
CLNinja is offline  
Unread 03-30-2009, 01:54 AM   #45
Texas ZJ1
Jeep Jedi Master
 
Texas ZJ1's Avatar
1994 ZJ 
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Omaha, NE
Posts: 20,099
How to replace a ZJ sunroof seal by NevadaGary

Great writeup with pics. Thanks Gary.

After removing the glass, with attached frame, I removed the sun shade to reattach the fabric to the front and back by pushing the spring plungers on one side and lifting it out of its groove under the slide. You can see the spring plungers in the picture. I used two way trophy tape to hold down the fabric but it was so rotten in spots that I used Gorilla tape on the whole front of it. The back wasn’t bad so trophy tape worked just fine.




Next picture is the glass with the old seal on it. You can see how twisted the seal was and in the upper left corner how ripped and damaged it was.



Next step is removing the old seal which just pulls off no problem and installing the new seal. Start at the middle of back side of the glass which is the side with the trademark on it and put the seal in place with the rubber part on the glass side not the metal (frame) side. Use a rubber hammer and stretch it into place and wrap it around the corners gently pounding it into place. Pound it down good and secure. Be careful that you don’t roll the rubber part as you install the seal. Make sure it is flat against the glass. Make sure you have straight smooth edges that meet tightly. Follow the maker’s instruction on this. At this point I removed all the nuts and put a drop of non hardening thread locker on each one and screwed the nuts in place leaving about a 1/16 inch space between the base of the nut and the frame. That will allow plenty of room when installing the glass on the mechanism.





After you have installed the seal you are ready to put it all back together. If you pulled the sunshade you have to install that first. Just lay it over the opening and push the two spring plungers on one side to drop the sunshade into its place in the groove. Repeat on the other side and make sure it is seated in its groove and moves easily.

Next put the glass with nuts in place over the keyholes, line the nuts up and push down. When all three nuts per side are in place push the glass forward and tighten the nuts with your 10mm wrench. I just tightened good and tight but didn’t use a torque wrench.

Almost finished. Now you have to reinstall the covers. Note the clips and the pins they snap on to. There’s three on each side and you just line them up and push the cover toward the back of the vehicle.



Now you can enjoy the beautiful sunshine and stay dry too.
__________________
00 4.7 Laredo...stock

94 5.9 Laredo 6.5 RE lift with 35 Maxxis Bighorns
and 33 Bridgestone Duelers
Detroit and true trac
Red Jeep Club Member
REDNECK JCM
Texas Jeep Owner #6
USN Jeep Club #4
http://www.kevinsoffroad.com/
602.841.3355

For your performance needs:

kolak@kolakperformance.com
480.998.3661
Texas ZJ1 is offline  
Closed Thread
Thread Tools


Suggested Threads





Jeep, Wrangler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, and other models are copyrighted and trademarked to Jeep/Chrysler Corporation. JeepForum.com is not in any way associated with Jeep or the Chrysler Corp.