How to Guide: Replacing 8.8 E-brake shoes - JeepForum.com
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Unread 06-11-2011, 11:34 PM   #1
jason280
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How to Guide: Replacing 8.8 E-brake shoes

In the process of converting my 8.8 axle to disc brakes, I noticed the E-brake/parking brake shoes were in terrible condition. Both sides had cracks, and one completely fell off its backing when I removed the rotor. So, since I was converting the brakes, I figured it would be a great time to replace the E-brake shores.

Looking at the pics below, you will notice I cheated a bit. I changed the shoes out while the axle shafts were removed, which is infinitely easier than with them in place. Not only that, but you will see the axle is not even under a Jeep yet (e-brake cable not attached) and the rotors and calipers are removed. I would imagine this job is considerably more difficult to do while the rearend is under the Jeep and with all the components still in place, but this is one lesson I haven't learned yet.

You will also notice that my brake orientation is not what you would find in a mounted axle. In a mounted axle, the springs would be horizontal across the assembly, with the spring pair at the bottom and the adjuster at the top. Because my work was done with the pinion hanging straight down, my springs appear vertical. Regardless, the procedure is the same.

Nevertheless, here is a step-by-step guide of how I changed the shoes:

Here are a couple of pics with the old shoes in place...





Now, there are a couple of different ways to start, but I'll give you what I think is the easiest way.

Looking at the assembly in my pics, you will see two springs running vertically on the right hand side (one outside the shoe assembly and one behind), and one spring running parallel with the adjuster. This particular spring, we'll call it the adjuster spring, seats in the notches of the star bolt on the adjuster to prevent it from turning. Start by removing the adjuster spring, then remove the outside longer spring. The longer spring is a bit of a pain the remove, so be careful! I used a pair of needle nose pliers, and I'm sure they make a tool that's better suited for the job.

Here are the two springs removed:



Once these springs are removed, you will have to remove the clips holding the shoes in place to the backing plate. You can see these in the pic above, located roughly at the 7 & 11 o'clock positions. Here's a closeup:




To remove the clip, simply squeeze the tab in and slide the clip over. It will pop off the stud holding it to the backing plate. It will come apart into two pieces, the clip itself and the stud.



The stud will simply push through the backing plate, just be careful not to lose it!

With both the studs and clips removed, you can now remove the adjuster. To do this, simply pull the two shoe halves apart, and the adjuster can be pulled out. The two halves will the collapse down, so be careful not to pinch yourself. Here's what you should have with the adjuster now removed and the clips/studs out:



Slide the two halves towards one another as closely in as possible, and you will be able to work the opposing sides off the e-brake cable arm assembly, which extends in through the backing plate. Its simply grooved/notched in place, but it can be difficult at times. Once off, the two halves will only be connected via the one lonely spring, so go ahead and remove the spring.

Here's what you end up with:



Here's what my old shoes looked like...




...and a new $20 replacement set from Advance!



Of course, reinstallation is basically everything in reverse, but we'll go through that as well.

Go ahead and assemble the two halves by attaching the spring to the back portion of the shoe assembly.



The ends nearest the spring fit in with the actuating assembly, and you will have to do some manipulating to get it back in place. Once in, it will look like this:



Pull the sides apart, and remount the adjuster.



Now, line up the holes for the studs which hold the shoes to the backing plate, and slide the studs in place. Here's the easiest way I found to pop the clip back over the stud, just use a pair of needle nose pliers:



Do this for both halves, and you can then replace the other longer spring. Don't attach the adjuster spring yet, as you may need to adjust the brakes to accommodate the new shoes. At this point, you should have the studs/clips in place, the two inner and outer springs attached, and the adjuster in place between the two shoes. Now that you are at this point, center the assembly as best as you can in the backing plate. Next, try and slide on the rotor. This will let you know if the assembly is centered, and if not, you can move it around as needed. If you can't seem to get it centered enough, you may have to loosen up the adjuster to account for the new shoes (which is what I had to do).



Once the rotors will slide over the shoes without contact, you should be good to go. Install the adjuster spring, reassemble rotors, tires, etc, and see how the brake holds up in real word conditions.

If I missed anything, or if there is an easier way of doing things, please let me know. This is the fist set of shoes I have ever changed, and it was not as difficult as I had imagined.

Hope this helps!

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Unread 06-11-2011, 11:51 PM   #2
Tompatt
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nice write up. hey jason where you located in middle georgia?
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Unread 06-12-2011, 12:01 AM   #3
jason280
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Yes, right outside of Milledgeville.
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Unread 06-14-2011, 05:55 AM   #4
jason280
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For those who have other axles, specifically the D35 or D44, is the method pretty much the same for changing the e-brake shoes?
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Unread 06-14-2011, 06:00 AM   #5
g4x4xgeoff
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jason280 View Post
For those who have other axles, specifically the D35 or D44, is the method pretty much the same for changing the e-brake shoes?


its similar, with a few little differences (wheel cylinder, etc)
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Unread 06-14-2011, 03:30 PM   #6
jason280
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Quote:
its similar, with a few little differences (wheel cylinder, etc)
Thanks! I assumed they would be fairly close to one another. I may end up doing the shoes on my '91 B2600i 4x4, and it will be interesting to see if they share any similarities.
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Unread 06-14-2011, 04:12 PM   #7
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I remember replacing the shoes on my 8.8. It was major pain in my...side. IIRC I ended up putting one side of the springs on the shoes and sliding the whole assembly over the axle flange. I guess I was just lucky I had the axle on saw horses. Good write-up Jason.
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Unread 06-15-2011, 05:40 PM   #8
jason280
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Yeah, I can see where replacing the shoes with the axle shafts in place would be a major PITA. Certainly doable, but far from easy!
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