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Stainless Steel Door Hinge PinsPoly Door Hinge BushingsDisc Brake Kits from ECGS

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Unread 01-09-2011, 03:54 PM   #1
E_ROCK
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1993 YJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Crawlerado
Posts: 2,406
EROCK's Complete Build

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Year & Model
1993 Jeep YJ Wrangler

Engine
Stock 4.0L

Transmission/Transfer Case
Stock AX-15 transmission
Energy Suspension poly Tranny mount
Atlas 2 speed with 5.0 ratio
Centerforce II Clutch
CV rear driveshaft
Custom made square front CV driveshaft

Front axle
Wagoneer D44 axle
Spicer 4.88 gears
ARB locker
CTM u-joints
USA Alloy 4340 Chromoly shafts
Custom Axle truss
Warn Premium lockout hubs
Ballistic Fab D44 knuckle gussets
Rockcrusher Diff cover
Spidertrax 1.5” wheel spacer

Rear Axle
Wagoneer D44 axle
Spicer 4.88 gears
ARB locker
TnT Axle truss
Rockcrusher Diff cover
Spidertrax 1.5” wheel spacer
TSM Mfg. disk brake kit


Suspension - Custom spring over axle leaf spring suspension
Front
6” stretch with relocated steering box
Alcan springs using Ruffstuff spring hangers, custom thru the frame shackle hangers, and Ground Pounder Fab boomerang 3/8” thick shackles
Energy Suspension leaf spring poly bushings
Custom 1.5” DOM shock hoops
BBCS 11” travel gas charge shocks
2" Fox air bumps

Rear
4” stretch using GenRight Crawler gas tank
Ford Ranger bastard packs using Ruffstuff spring hangers, Ruffstuff Way Back shackle hangers, and Rough Country boomerang 3/8" thick shackles
Energy Suspension leaf spring poly bushings
Poly Performance outboarding shock kit w/ Ballistic Fab gussets
Bilstein 14” travel gas charged 5125 series shock (255/70 valving)
Modified MORE anti-wrap bar
Custom Timbren faux air bumps

Steering
Sky Manufacturing tall high steer arms w/ cone washers, and 5/8” stud kit
1.25” x 0.28” wall DOM with 7”-18tpi tapped ends
1 ton GM TREs
MORE steering box brace
Tapped Saginaw steering box for hydro assist
PSC 1.75" hydraulic assist ram assist w/ custom made mounts

Armor
Custom made 1.75” tube fenders
Custom made Ό” thick boatside rockers
Custom made Full 6 point, 1.75” tubing cage
Custom made 2”x4” boxed tube cross member bumper w/ build-in hitch and frame gussets
Custom made front 2”x4” boxed tube stubby bumper w/ custom winch mount
Genright Tub guards
Poison Spyder Comp Cut Crusher Corners with 3” tube flare
Custom made bellyup T-case skid plate
Custom made 1.75” tubing radiator hoop
AEV Oil Pan Skid Plate

Wheel and Tires
15” AR-23s (Spyderlock 17” 6061 T-6 aluminum wheels sitting on the garage shelf)

Seats
Yonaka Samurai Synthetic leather racing seats
RCI 5 point harnesses
Custom seat mounts tied to cage

Misc
Superwinch EPi9.0 winch
Sanden On Board Air
MORE 1” lift "Bomb Proof" Motor Mounts
Energy Suspension Body mounts
AAI Speed Equipment SS braided brake lines
Advance Adapters SS braided clutch line
Custom cold air intake tube by Hanksville Hot Rod w/ Spectre air filter
Mac Custom tie-down tracks in bed
Herculined interior
Grenade shift knob
CJ swingdown tailgate
40mm ammo can console
QuickFist for spare shaft storage

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Unread 01-09-2011, 03:54 PM   #2
E_ROCK
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Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Crawlerado
Posts: 2,406
(REV 0)
I bought my 1993 jeep wrangler in 2003. The jeep was pretty much stock. It needed new shoes right away. I put some 31” Pro-Comp X-terrains on. The jeep was clean, but a clean jeep wasn’t in this jeeps future.
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Unread 01-09-2011, 03:55 PM   #3
E_ROCK
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Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Crawlerado
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(REV 1)
3.5” Black Diamond Lift, OBA, Kargo master rack, and Rear TJ flares
The goal, at that time, was a great camping/hunting/exploring vehicle. The next logically step was to add a cargo rack, small lift, TJ rear flares, and OBA.

Camping roof rack, small shackle lift.


I added a Blackdiamond 3.5” lift with TJ rear Flares


Sanden OBA
http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f37/s...ard-air-58213/

The first step for OBA is acquiring an A/C compressor. I limited my junkyard search to a stock compressor that came out of a ’91 to ’95 Wrangler or Cherokee. Compressor of those years will bolt directly into the A/C mounting bracket. If you are buying a compressor, you will need to get an additional idler pulley, pulley bushing, bolt, and belt. The Figure 1 shows the location of the pulley (1) and bushing (2).


If you are using your stock A/C, you are one step ahead. But you will need to purge the A/C system of all the Freon. You will not need to buy a new belt or pulley. The next picture is a schematic of the system.


Figure 3 show the intake side of the compressor. (3) is the air filter. (4) is the air tool lubricator. The air filter is a crankcase filter. The air tool oiler can be bought at harbor freight.


Figure 4 shows the fitting used on the suction and discharge ports of the compressor. (5) is a 1/4" NPT elbow. (6) is a 3/4" to 1/2" NPT (female to female) fitting. (7) is a 1/2" to 1/4" NPT (male to female) fitting.


Figure 5 shows what is needed after the discharge port. I chose to mount everything to the scissor jack mount. (8) is the oil/air filter. (9) is the check valve. (10) is pressure gage. (11) is pressure sensor switch.


Figure 6 show the location of my front quick connect.


Figure 7 show the location of my rear connect.


Figure 8 show the location of my tank. I drilled up through the tub and used 4 bolts.
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Unread 01-09-2011, 03:56 PM   #4
E_ROCK
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1993 YJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Crawlerado
Posts: 2,406
(REV 2)
Waggy 44 axle swap with ARBs, SOA, high steer
I got involved in a 4-wheeling group that liked to push my skills and limits of my jeep. I had to make a decision about my rig. Would it be a weekend warrior or would it become a rock crawler? I just enjoyed the difficult trails to much. It was time to move on to a suspension/axle setup that could handle the abuse. SOA, axle swap, lockers, and high steer were all needed.




http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f12/d...e-swap-146457/

I started off by completely rebuilding the waggy D44 axles. I replaced all the bearings, installed ARBs, 4.88 gears, put in a rear disk brake conversion kit on the rear axle, and install junkyard flattop knuckle with highsteer arms. I also took the transfer case out and installed a stubby SYE kit. I don’t have any picture of that stuff. The next step was cutting all the un-used items off the axles. This is my buddy doing some handy work with the plasma cutter. After cutting you need to grind everything down to make a smoother surface for welding on new perches. I used Mopar perches since they are cheap and are good quality.


The next step is setting the rear pinion angle. I don’t have any pictures of this either, but it is not biggie. Install you springs and have your new U-bolts and plates ready. (Side note – get beefy U-bolts custom made like 5/8” dia and plates at least 1/2" thick plates). Center you axle under the vehicle by measuring distance from the springs to end of axle on both sides in multiple spots on your springs. Put your new perches on the axle tube and drop the springs on them (lower the vehicle so all the weight is on the springs). Install your U-bolts and plates, but don’t tighten the u-bolts so tight that the axle can’t rotate. Put a floor jack under the pinion and move it to the desired pinion angle. I have a CV rear drive shaft, so I pointed mine just a touch under the transfer case yoke. Check and recheck all your measurements and angles because after the next step there it is hard to go back. Tighten your U-bolts and tack weld the perches. Remove the U-bolts and the axle. Finish the weld and reinstall the axle. Here is a look at the rear when after that is done.


The next step is to install some sort of traction bar so the rear axle doesn’t get axle wrap. I made a custom cross member out of 2”x2”x 3/16” tube. I bent angles in the tube to allow my transfer case to be removed. It hangs down a little low but no lower than my skid plate. The traction bar that was used was a MORE. The traction bar has mounting brackets provided that weld to the axle tube. The cross member that holds the traction bar mount. (NOTE – this traction bar setup worked, but it caused the rear end of my jeep to hop when climbing rock ledges. I later increased the length of the traction bar when I did my rear stretch and the rear doesn’t hop anymore).


The frame tie in for the cross member.


The traction bar from MORE.
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Unread 01-09-2011, 03:57 PM   #5
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I made a custom upper shock mount by doing another cross member. It spans the width of the frame right at the gas tank. It is really fun welding this one in! I waited to put the shock tabs and bump stops until I got the front axle in. If you wait you can test the articulation to see where your problems interferences will be.
The shock mount cross member


Here is the finished rear with shock tabs welded in. Hook up your brakes, axle breather tubes.


Now for the front
The front axle has a little more to it but not much. Same procedure cut off everything you don’t need and grind everything smooth. Put your springs on and center your axle under the vehicle. Put your perches, plates, and U-bolts on. Now here is the tricky question, front pinion angle. In the front there is going to be three choices you can face. 1) you can make your castor correct but have a pinion that points really low 2) have a better pinion angle but have poor castor 3)cut and rotator your knuckle Castor is important because this is what makes your vehicle drive straight down the highway and it also makes your steering wheel re-center after completing a corner. I choose number two because I was a little tight on money and I only drive my jeep to get to trails. I set my jeep up to have 4 degrees of positive castor (instead of the desired negative 5 degrees).
(NOTE – This wasn’t the best choice. I didn’t like how my jeep drove, so I ended up cutting and rotating the knuckles on my waggy axle. This is the best choice. My pinion is rotated up out of the way and my jeep drives great on the highway).

Here is a picture of the front




Front driver’s side U-bolt on waggy D44 front axle



Checking shocks and bumpstops.


The last step is measuring your drive shaft lengths and installing them.


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Unread 01-09-2011, 03:58 PM   #6
E_ROCK
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Location: Crawlerado
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Swing-out Tire carrier
I made a swingout tire carrier to hold the spare 36” Iroks and two jerry cans.


I used a trailer hub from Northern Tools (http://www.northerntool.com) or my hinge. The hub comes with a spindle, two bearings, seal, hub, castle nut, and a cap with a grease zerk.


I looked at my bumper to decide where I was going to mount and weld the spindle to the bumper. I have two round bars that stick out of the top of my bumper and bolt through the bottom.


I removed to passenger side bar to see if the spindle would slip in the hole that was left.


The spindle was a little larger than the hole, but it would work! I had a good idea that actually came from the rods that stuck out of my bumper. Since the rods were bolted through the bottom, I decide to bolt my spindle through the bottom too. The spindle was already had a hole all the way through the shaft. All I had to do was too drill out the hole larger and tap threads in it.



The next step was a two phased step. I had to remove the material from the hub to get a good weldable surface and I also had to weld the spindle in. I used a plasma cutter on the hub, followed by a lot of grinding with a 4" grinder. I also cut a hole on the backside of my bumper to weld the spindle on the inside.


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Unread 01-09-2011, 03:59 PM   #7
E_ROCK
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Location: Crawlerado
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Finish up the bumper by welding the patch back in and grinding down the weld.


I used 2"x2"x3/16" square tubing for my tire carrier. (NOTE – use lighter material this swingout tire carrier is way too heavy)









With the tire on


Broke the tire off the carrier in Moab



I fixed it by mounting the tire higher and more of an angle
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Unread 01-09-2011, 04:00 PM   #8
E_ROCK
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1993 YJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Crawlerado
Posts: 2,406
(REV 3)
Full Roll Cage, Boat-side Rockers, Tube fenders

I was starting to have quite a collection of rock rash and I was starting to push my jeep where it wasn’t safe without a cage. The next stage of jeep evolution was starting to take shape. Boat side rocker with a full cage tied into them and finish everything off with some front tube fenders.

Opps……


Boat-side Rockers
They are a great mod. They let you glide through obstacles and rocks would hang you before. It doesn’t look like you are cutting much out, however the gains seem huge on the trail. The only downfall are the stock body mounts locations. They seem to get beat up a lot.

Why do they call it boat-sides? Well, you jeep will begin to look like a boat hull. Kinda like this \____/

The hardest question to answer is “how far in do I want to cut?” Ideally, the further inboard you cut the better. However, if I would have cut too far inboard, I would lose space for the roll cage and get into seat belt issues.

I decide to avoid relocated my lower seat belt mount, so it meant only cutting 3” inboard and 4” vertical.
Here is a dimensional drawing of the new rockers.


Instead of getting the metal bent first and cutting my rockers, I decided to make a sheet metal guide. With the guide, I was able to use a light piece of metal that was easy to work with rather than a 70lb object. Here is a picture of the sheet metal guide with another guide I made. One sheet metal guide is about 10” long, the other was about 2 ft long.


After my guide was made, I made my first mark to cut and remove my front fenders. I drew a line across the side of my rocker with a marker 4” up. I cut from front to back using an air angle grinder. This cut is the easiest. After the jeep is cut all the way across, I needed to remove the side of the rocker without cutting into the floor board. The easiest way to do this is removing all the tack welds in the lip the hold the floor pan and the rocker together. I used the angle grinder to grind most of the tack weld apart and a screw driver to break the remaining spot weld apart.

Here is a picture of the tack weld from under the jeep looking at the lip.


Continue removing the tack welds and pulling off the sheet metal.



After you are done removing the side of the rocker, you should have an easier time marking and cutting the floor pan.


I used my sheet metal guides to mark the floor pan where to cut. The plan with the floor pan was to leave an extra inch and fold the floor pan where it meets the rocker. Then I would have a place to tack weld the floor to the rocker to stiffen the cut floor. I started at the rear wheel well and worked forward.
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Unread 01-09-2011, 04:01 PM   #9
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Rear wheel well area


Seat Belt area


Seat area


After I was finished cutting, I put the guide to get a feel for the final look.


Just and FYI….If you are using crappy roller tires in your garage, make sure they hold air before storing a tool box under your axle. Otherwise it turns into a jack stand.

From the front.


I had the rockers bent at a local metal fab shop. It takes a pretty big metal brake to bend Ό” plate for that long of distance.


The rockers have to be cut to account for the area of the frame that is wider (rear). I cut an angled line to keep the rocker so that is will extend to the centerline of the frame.




I capped the ends of the rocker and counter-sunk all the bolts.


The forward most forward body mount is welded to the frame slightly higher than the rest. This is how I took care of this body mount.
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Unread 01-09-2011, 04:03 PM   #10
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Tube fenders and hood hoop

I bought a little home made bender and started to kink some tube.

The biggest problem with is type of bender is that you can’t bend tubing much more than 90 degrees and makes hood hoops hard to do.

Hoop while bending (taken a beer break)


Finished hoop


Metal strap bolted to firewall


Notching tube


I made a piece of tube that followed the angle of the hood. The tube has one single bend 13" from the firewall at 12 degrees. I also used tubing flanges to make the bumper and tube fender removable.


The other angle


To add some strength, I put in an angled piece from the bottom of the hoop to the tube fender.


Welded nuts to the inside of the boat-tub rockers
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Unread 01-09-2011, 04:04 PM   #11
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Tube flange on the outside











Inner fenders

Pre-bend



After bending with some trimming













NOTE – I don’t suggest building tube fenders where the hood hoop or stinger ties into the fenders. If you push you hood hoop into rocks, it will dent and buckle your firewall. I ended up using a rack at a body shop to pull my firewall back out and I modified my tube fenders.
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Unread 01-09-2011, 04:05 PM   #12
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Modification to tube fenders

I had a friend bend a traditional hood hoop


Added a genright tub guard



Welded the piece of metal to the front edge of the Gen right tub guard


I cut the tubing off that attached to hood hoop.



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Unread 01-09-2011, 04:09 PM   #13
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Full cage

Removed on roll bars



B-pillar hoop


B-pillar floor plates


The rocker was drilled with a 1.75” hole and spacers were welded.


Finished picture of B-pillar plates




B-Pillar was set in and tack welded to floor plate.


C-pillar frame tie-in



A picture of the frame tie-in.



A-pillars
The legs where made with two bends in it. I worked my bends from the floor up to the B-pillar. The first is 23 degrees to follow the windshield. The second is 67 degrees with 6 degree off axis with the first bend.
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Unread 01-09-2011, 04:10 PM   #14
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How to use a pipe master
First place a piece of masking tape where the leg will meet up with the B-pillar.


Take a small piece of tube and put a piece of steel strap vise gripped to it. The strap will help you position the tube on the curve of the hoop. Eyeball the tube with the tape and tack weld it on the B-pillar.



Take your tube master and get the pattern of the notch. It is easier to push the pins with your fingers than sliding the whole pipe master into position. Transfer the pattern to the work piece (A-pillar leg). You need to mark the A-pillar where you think the notch will be.


A-pillar legs


A-pillar floor plate. Since this plates sit directly over the boat side rockers, I am not worried about it punching though the floor board, so no lower plate was made.


Windshield spreader bars


Seat mounts


Seats and harnesses


Rear hoop and C-pllar legs


Roof



Hoisting the cage out for finally welding and paint


Finished





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Unread 01-09-2011, 04:12 PM   #15
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(REV 4)
Shackle reversal, Rotating knuckles on a LP D44, square front driveshat, front axle truss and hyrdo assist ram

I ripped the shackle clean from the frame. I didn’t like how my jeep was driving anyway. It wondered all over the road. The caster needed to be adjusted. Cutting and rotating the knuckles was in order. I was having trouble steering on the trails. The stock pump/box was underpowered. A truss completed the package.

http://www.rockfrogs.org/video/indy-eric.wmv


Shackle Reversal
Front leaf spring mount



Dropped the front suspension


Using a piece of all-thread, I was able to get everything lined up.


Side view of bracket


The next part was to drill a 1.5" hole into the frame and sleeve it with a piece of tubing. I put the vehicle weight on the springs and used a 1/4" plate to leave some space between the spring eye and the frame. I bolted one shackle plate to the leaf eye and used the shackle to strike an arc. I then drew a line down the frame about 1" from the bottom of it. My springs measure 44.5" eye-to-eye with vehicle weight. Completely flat, they measure 46". To figure out where to drill, I just measured 1.5" (46"-44.5") away from where the arc and the line intersect. Drilled a pilot hole and finished off with a 1.5" hole saw. The tube is stitched welded in.


This is shackle with vehicle weight.


I definitely gained some approach angle. No more banging huge shackles on rocks.
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