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Unread 02-10-2014, 11:02 PM   #1
cherokeesport94
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Transmission shift issue

My 94 jeep cherokee sport auto is having trouble shifting. It stays in one gear and when driving my rpms are at 2000 to 2500. It drives fine but it takes a bit for it to get it going I have to put it to a low gear (1-2) for it to pick up to speed then I shift it into drive. Is there something I can adjust for it to properly shift through all the gears?

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Unread 02-11-2014, 05:46 AM   #2
uberxj92
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It sounds like the tcm isn't getting power. Check fuses. Check the plug in the tcm make sure its still plugged I good. Check plugs on trans too. Search on how to test for power to the tcm. If its getting power it may be bad. They're a dime s dozen in the junk yards. Be sure to replace it with 91-95.
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Unread 02-11-2014, 09:19 AM   #3
tjwalker
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Ever seen a check engine light?

1. The "throttle position sensor" is an engine management sensor that is directly involved in shifting characteristics of the AW4 and should be verified. Here's more on this important sensor.

2. Be sure your TV cable is adjusted properly. Here's a link.
http://www.cherokeeforum.com/f2/free-quick-fix-41821/

3. Be sure transmission fluid is at the correct level, is red in color, and does not smell burnt. When was it changed last?
------------------------------------------------------------
The throttle position sensor is connected to the throttle shaft on the throttle body. It sends throttle valve angle information to the PCM. The PCM uses this information to determine how much fuel the engine needs. The TPS is really just a simple potentiometer with one end connected to 5 volts from the PCM and the other to ground. A third wire is connected to the PCM. As you move the accelerator pedal with your foot, the output of the TPS changes. At a closed throttle position, the output of the TPS is low, about a half a volt. As the throttle valve opens, the output increases so that, at wide open throttle, the output voltage should be above 3.9 volts. Testing can be performed with an electrical meter. Analog meter is best. You are looking for a smooth sweep of voltage throughout the entire throttle band. While slowly opening and closing the throttle, take note to the movement of the voltmeter needle. There should be a direct relationship between the needle motion to the motion of the throttle. If at anytime the needle moves abruptly or inconsistently with the movement of the throttle, the TPS is bad

You should have 5 volts going into the TPS. At idle, TPS output voltage must be greater than 200 millivolts. At wide open throttle (WOT), TPS output voltage must be less than 4.8 volts.. The best is to use an analog meter (not digital) to see if the transition from idle to WOT is smooth with no dead spots. With your meter set for volts, put the black probe on a good ground like your negative battery terminal. With the key on, engine not running, test with the red probe of your meter (install a paper clip into the back of the plug of the TPS) to see which wire has the 5 volts. One of the other wires should show .26V (or so). The other wire will be the ground and should show no voltage. Move the throttle and look for smooth meter response up to the 4.49 at WOT.

Perform the test procedure again and wiggle and/or tap on the TPS while you watch the meter. If you notice any flat spots or abrupt changes in the meter readings, replace the TPS.

The TPS is sensitive to heat, moisture and vibration leading to the failure of some units. The sensor is a sealed unit and cannot be repaired only replaced. A TPS may fail gradually leading to a number of symptoms which can include one or more of the following: -

NOTE: The throttle position sensor is also DIRECTLY involved with transmission shifting characteristics! It should be verified early in the troubleshooting process, when a transmission issue is suspected!

• Poor idle control: The TPS is used by the ECU to determine if the throttle is closed and the car should be using the Idle Air Control Valve exclusively for idle control. A fault TPS sensor can confuse the ECU causing the idle to be erratic or "hunting".
• High Idle Speed: The TPS may report faulty values causing the engine idle speed to be increased above normal. This is normally found in conjunction with a slow engine return to idle speed symptom.
• Slow engine return to idle: A failing TPS can report the minimum throttle position values incorrectly which can stop the engine entering idle mode when the throttle is closed. Normally when the throttle is closed the engine fuel injectors will be deactivated until a defined engine RPM speed is reached and the engine brought smoothly to idle speed. When failing a TPS will not report the throttle closed and fueling will continue causing the engine to return to idle very slowly.
• Engine Hesitation on Throttle Application: The TPS is also used by the ECU to determine if the driver has applied the throttle quicker than the Manifold Air Pressure sensor can read. The fueling is adjusted accordingly to cope with the sudden increase in air volume, however a faulty sensor can cause the ECU to ignore this data and the engine will "hesitate" when applying the throttle. In extreme cases with the engine at idle, a sudden application of full throttle can stall the engine.
• Engine Misfire: A fault TPS can report values outside the denied acceptable range causing the ECU to incorrectly fuel the engine. This is noticeable as a slight misfire and can trigger the misfire detection software and/or Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) light on the dashboard. Extreme cases can cause excessing misfires resulting in one or more cylinders being shut down to prevent engine and catalytic converter damage.
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Unread 02-11-2014, 09:27 AM   #4
CCKen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uberxj92 View Post
It sounds like the tcm isn't getting power. Check fuses. Check the plug in the tcm make sure its still plugged I good. Check plugs on trans too. Search on how to test for power to the tcm. If its getting power it may be bad. They're a dime s dozen in the junk yards. Be sure to replace it with 91-95.
Actually, the TCM for the '92-'95 are the same. '91 is different.

'92-'95 TCM part number is 56026769.
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Unread 02-11-2014, 09:29 AM   #5
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All good advice above from tjwalker.
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Unread 02-11-2014, 09:11 PM   #6
JbmLaredo
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X2 on tps!! I replaced a trans before I knew any better because of that &@$!ing thing
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Unread 02-11-2014, 09:42 PM   #7
cherokeesport94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjwalker
Ever seen a check engine light? 1. The "throttle position sensor" is an engine management sensor that is directly involved in shifting characteristics of the AW4 and should be verified. Here's more on this important sensor. 2. Be sure your TV cable is adjusted properly. Here's a link. http://www.cherokeeforum.com/f2/free-quick-fix-41821/ 3. Be sure transmission fluid is at the correct level, is red in color, and does not smell burnt. When was it changed last? ------------------------------------------------------------ The throttle position sensor is connected to the throttle shaft on the throttle body. It sends throttle valve angle information to the PCM. The PCM uses this information to determine how much fuel the engine needs. The TPS is really just a simple potentiometer with one end connected to 5 volts from the PCM and the other to ground. A third wire is connected to the PCM. As you move the accelerator pedal with your foot, the output of the TPS changes. At a closed throttle position, the output of the TPS is low, about a half a volt. As the throttle valve opens, the output increases so that, at wide open throttle, the output voltage should be above 3.9 volts. Testing can be performed with an electrical meter. Analog meter is best. You are looking for a smooth sweep of voltage throughout the entire throttle band. While slowly opening and closing the throttle, take note to the movement of the voltmeter needle. There should be a direct relationship between the needle motion to the motion of the throttle. If at anytime the needle moves abruptly or inconsistently with the movement of the throttle, the TPS is bad You should have 5 volts going into the TPS. At idle, TPS output voltage must be greater than 200 millivolts. At wide open throttle (WOT), TPS output voltage must be less than 4.8 volts.. The best is to use an analog meter (not digital) to see if the transition from idle to WOT is smooth with no dead spots. With your meter set for volts, put the black probe on a good ground like your negative battery terminal. With the key on, engine not running, test with the red probe of your meter (install a paper clip into the back of the plug of the TPS) to see which wire has the 5 volts. One of the other wires should show .26V (or so). The other wire will be the ground and should show no voltage. Move the throttle and look for smooth meter response up to the 4.49 at WOT. Perform the test procedure again and wiggle and/or tap on the TPS while you watch the meter. If you notice any flat spots or abrupt changes in the meter readings, replace the TPS. The TPS is sensitive to heat, moisture and vibration leading to the failure of some units. The sensor is a sealed unit and cannot be repaired only replaced. A TPS may fail gradually leading to a number of symptoms which can include one or more of the following: - NOTE: The throttle position sensor is also DIRECTLY involved with transmission shifting characteristics! It should be verified early in the troubleshooting process, when a transmission issue is suspected! • Poor idle control: The TPS is used by the ECU to determine if the throttle is closed and the car should be using the Idle Air Control Valve exclusively for idle control. A fault TPS sensor can confuse the ECU causing the idle to be erratic or "hunting". • High Idle Speed: The TPS may report faulty values causing the engine idle speed to be increased above normal. This is normally found in conjunction with a slow engine return to idle speed symptom. • Slow engine return to idle: A failing TPS can report the minimum throttle position values incorrectly which can stop the engine entering idle mode when the throttle is closed. Normally when the throttle is closed the engine fuel injectors will be deactivated until a defined engine RPM speed is reached and the engine brought smoothly to idle speed. When failing a TPS will not report the throttle closed and fueling will continue causing the engine to return to idle very slowly. • Engine Hesitation on Throttle Application: The TPS is also used by the ECU to determine if the driver has applied the throttle quicker than the Manifold Air Pressure sensor can read. The fueling is adjusted accordingly to cope with the sudden increase in air volume, however a faulty sensor can cause the ECU to ignore this data and the engine will "hesitate" when applying the throttle. In extreme cases with the engine at idle, a sudden application of full throttle can stall the engine. • Engine Misfire: A fault TPS can report values outside the denied acceptable range causing the ECU to incorrectly fuel the engine. This is noticeable as a slight misfire and can trigger the misfire detection software and/or Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) light on the dashboard. Extreme cases can cause excessing misfires resulting in one or more cylinders being shut down to prevent engine and catalytic converter damage.
there no check engine light on when driving and I'm possibly thinking the cable needs adjusted and also get a new tps
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Unread 02-12-2014, 04:02 AM   #8
Roler
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Does it shift ok manually?
You can always adjust the kickdown cable, to see if that makes any difference at all...
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Unread 02-12-2014, 06:15 AM   #9
mjonesjr
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Pull the codes anyway. I'd bet there is a bad shift solenoid.

This is the exact same thing my '98 was doing when I bought it. It didn't have a check engine light, but it had a "B Shift Solenoid" code. I replaced the solenoids and it shifts perfect now. The solenoids can be had from Amazon for $69 for all 3 (A Shift, B Shift, and TQ lockup).

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1


Here is what I used to test the resistance on my solenoids. I got this from a member on Cherokee Forum.


There are tests you can perform at the TCM connector to see if the Transmission Range Sensor (NSS) contacts are defective and to see if a solenoid is bad.

You'll need a digital Volt/Ohmmeter.

Refer to the TCM pinout below.

Turn the ignition to RUN, without cranking the engine.

Test the NSS contacts:

Use a Voltmeter.

Shift the trans to 1-2.

Read between pin cavity 21 and pin cav 24, you should see battery voltage.

Repeat voltage tests at pin cav 9 in shift select 3, pin cav 22 in shift select D, and pin cav 18 in shift select R.

If any one of these tests shows a low voltage or no voltage, suspect that the NSS needs to be rebuilt.

Test the Solenoids:

Use an Ohmmeter.

Ignition OFF/LOCK, disconnect battery negative post connector.

Read between pin cav 12 and pin cav 24 as ground. You should see between 11 and 15 Ohms. 1-2 and 3-4 solenoid (A).

Repeat tests at pin cav 13. 2-3 solenoid (B), and pin cav 11. Lock-Up solenoid (C).

If any one of these tests shows a solenoid with out of range resistance, suspect the respective solenoid is bad.

Note that pin cav 24 is the TCM ground at ground G101 on the engine. It's located at the ignition coil attach bracket studs.

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Unread 02-12-2014, 07:39 AM   #10
CCKen
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The above TCM connector pinout is for '98-'01 AW4 TCM's. The procedures are for '97-'01 AW4's.

Below is the '94 TCM pinout that cherokeesport94 has.

The TCM is located under the passenger side dash.

The photo below the TCM pinout is a guide to the solenoids and at the bottom gives the TCM pins for the '94 TCM connector.

When checking the resistance of the solenoids at the TCM connector, use pin cavity D7 as the ground. D7 grounds at the oil dipstick tube mount bracket.

Before doing any resistance checks, disassemble the wire ring terminals at the ground point and clean them using Scotch-Brite pads to remoove any corrosion deposits, then reassemble dry. Do not use Dielectric grease on these ground wire ring terminals.

The resistance values of 11 to 15 Ohms remains the same for all years AW4 solenoids.



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Unread 02-12-2014, 09:32 AM   #11
mjonesjr
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CCKen View Post
The above TCM connector pinout is for '98-'01 AW4 TCM's. The procedures are for '97-'01 AW4's.

Below is the '94 TCM pinout that cherokeesport94 has.

The TCM is located under the passenger side dash.

The photo below the TCM pinout is a guide to the solenoids and at the bottom gives the TCM pins for the '94 TCM connector.

When checking the resistance of the solenoids at the TCM connector, use pin cavity D7 as the ground. D7 grounds at the oil dipstick tube mount bracket.

Before doing any resistance checks, disassemble the wire ring terminals at the ground point and clean them using Scotch-Brite pads to remoove any corrosion deposits, then reassemble dry. Do not use Dielectric grease on these ground wire ring terminals.

The resistance values of 11 to 15 Ohms remains the same for all years AW4 solenoids.



Thanks for the correction. I didn't realize what year he was working with.
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Unread 02-12-2014, 04:32 PM   #12
cherokeesport94
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I'm gonna try the simple things first before I start getting into the shift solenoids and all thaf
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Unread 02-12-2014, 05:34 PM   #13
mjonesjr
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I'd say ohming the shift solenoids out IS an easy and CHEAP test. Worst case is they are good and you plug the wiring back in.
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Unread 02-13-2014, 06:40 PM   #14
cherokeesport94
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mjonesjr
I'd say ohming the shift solenoids out IS an easy and CHEAP test. Worst case is they are good and you plug the wiring back in.
yeah that true doesn't hurt to test them
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Unread 02-20-2014, 11:08 PM   #15
cherokeesport94
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Well I got the chance to look at it and come to figure the tcm connector wasn't connected and it now shifts but It shifts at high rpms so i guess I'm going to adjust the tv cable.
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