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Unread 08-21-2008, 09:11 PM   #1
Dannn
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how to stop dry rot?

I got a free set of goodyear wrangler at/d 2 tires from my dad they only had 1000 miles on them and sat on an impounded explorer for 8-9 months. they ahve some very minor dry rot and i'd like to stop it... anything i can do?

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Unread 08-21-2008, 09:14 PM   #2
itasor
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Check the date on the inside of the tires after the DOT numbers. If they are >6 years old, don't use them, they could be dangerous. I don't think there is a way to stop dry rot.
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Unread 08-21-2008, 09:17 PM   #3
Dannn
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i'll check tomorrow but i don't think the atd2's were out 6 years ago and thats what i have... i'll check tomorrow for sure when its light outside.
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Unread 08-21-2008, 09:18 PM   #4
That1guy
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do you know how to read the date? It gives the week it was made and what year the week was in.
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Unread 08-21-2008, 09:26 PM   #5
Dannn
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yeah i can probably figure it out but that should help.
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Unread 08-21-2008, 10:14 PM   #6
GreenMeanie
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you will something like tuw5 yat7 1108 the last numbers are the week then the year.
If they are not infalted and keep them off the ground the will not dry rot.
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Unread 08-22-2008, 12:14 AM   #7
blacky_j
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straight from the horses mouth
Quote:
The date of a tire's manufacturer is found on the rim, to the right of the product code. The date code is often found on the inward side of the tire, so if they are already installed on the vehicle, the person has to lie underneath the car with a flashlight to check the dates. The date is a four digit code WWYY, with WW denoting the week (1-52) and YY denoting the year.
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Unread 08-22-2008, 08:50 AM   #8
Carnutzzz
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The only way to stop, or at least slow dry rot is to drive on them.
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Unread 08-22-2008, 09:50 AM   #9
oldmanriver
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnutzzz View Post
The only way to stop, or at least slow dry rot is to drive on them.
Er, how does that work out?

I was under the impression if they are dryrotting then theres not really much you can do about it..

Sounds like theyre running low on electrolytes, I'd soak them in gatorade
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Unread 08-22-2008, 10:24 AM   #10
Carnutzzz
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Tires contain compounds to combat tire rot. While driving, these compounds slowly make their way to the outside surface of the tire, thus "nourishing" it.

If not used, the tire's outside surface is subjected to ozone and other elements which dry out this layer.
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Unread 08-22-2008, 03:36 PM   #11
GreenMeanie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnutzzz View Post
The only way to stop, or at least slow dry rot is to drive on them.
Not ture at all.. I store well over 1300 tires, about 200 of them are discontinued and some up to 4-5 years old. Thes will not rot unless there is 1)air.. 2) ground contact.

Air- This is one of the reasons for the auto dealers move to nitro filled tires, it keeps them from roting while on the lot like "Good for a Year"s are so known to do........

Again, like I said, if they are not mounted order a tire bag or a rack..

http://www.tirerack.com/accessories/...orage_rack.jsp

or get 4 bags and hanging them..

http://www.tirerack.com/accessories/..._tire_tote.jsp



I may be new here, but I have been in the tire business for over 10 years... soo....
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Unread 08-22-2008, 09:19 PM   #12
HeepToJeep
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnutzzz View Post
Tires contain compounds to combat tire rot. While driving, these compounds slowly make their way to the outside surface of the tire, thus "nourishing" it.

If not used, the tire's outside surface is subjected to ozone and other elements which dry out this layer.
Centrifugal force moves molecules through solid material? Are you sure?

Wm
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Unread 08-22-2008, 10:15 PM   #13
Slowride63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carnutzzz View Post
The only way to stop, or at least slow dry rot is to drive on them.
I too am in the tire business, and there is truth in what Carnutzzz is saying. Once dry rot has started it cannot be stopped, but it can be slowed as mentioned. The following quote was taken directly from www.tireindustry.org, something GreenMeanie should be familliar with.

"Tire manufacturers add a wax-based protectant that helps to protect the tire against ozone, which will cause the tire to begin to crack and dry rot. This wax protectant is forced to the surface every time a tire is flexed as it rolls"....

Ozone and UV rays are the two main causes of dry rot, and this wax protectant slows the rot to an acceptable level. Using protectants containing silicone or petroleum products dissolves this wax and actually accelerates dry rot, so think about that the next time you put Armor All on your tires.
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Unread 08-23-2008, 12:01 AM   #14
GreenMeanie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slowride63 View Post
I too am in the tire business, and there is truth in what Carnutzzz is saying. Once dry rot has started it cannot be stopped, but it can be slowed as mentioned. The following quote was taken directly from www.tireindustry.org, something GreenMeanie should be familliar with.

"Tire manufacturers add a wax-based protectant that helps to protect the tire against ozone, which will cause the tire to begin to crack and dry rot. This wax protectant is forced to the surface every time a tire is flexed as it rolls"....

Ozone and UV rays are the two main causes of dry rot, and this wax protectant slows the rot to an acceptable level. Using protectants containing silicone or petroleum products dissolves this wax and actually accelerates dry rot, so think about that the next time you put Armor All on your tires.
The wax is a coating on the tire that will start to break up the first time they are road on. When the tire flexes it breaks up the coating and air can get to the polymer, once this happens the rot has started. The wax is really on to keep it from roting while in storage.
Carbon black is also there to help fight rot, its also the reason tires are black as we know the rubber compounds are white before the carbon black is added.

People ask me all the time why we donít shine the tires in the show room...

Anyway, we all kinda jumped the gun though giving advice before we even know how old the tire are and if rot has even started. Witch if they have already been used its more than likely already started...
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Unread 12-07-2012, 12:51 PM   #15
azvinnie
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Silly idea... if UV causes dry rot, how about putting sun screen on them... it works on the plastic covering on motorcycle clutch cables... why not tires?
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