Good QUIET exhaust? - JeepForum.com
Search  
Sign Up   Today's Posts
User: Pass: Remember?
Advertise Here
Jeep Home Jeep Forum Jeep Classifieds Jeep Registry JeepSpace Jeep Reviews Jeep Gallery Jeep Clubs Jeep Groups Jeep Videos Jeep Events Jeep Articles
Go Back JeepForum.com > Models > Jeep Cherokee & Comanche Forums > XJ Cherokee Technical Forum > Good QUIET exhaust?

Premium LED Lighting by VISION X, Proudly sold at ROCKRIDGBds fox ipf 2.0 racing series shocks now available at rockEngo winches available at www.rockridge4wd.com! Free shipp

Reply
Unread 05-17-2013, 09:47 PM   #1
Xride
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Edmonton Alberta
Posts: 1,415
Good QUIET exhaust?

Managed to snag a hole in my stock muffler and need to replace it so it doesn't sound like an old tractor.

What's my best option for maybe a bit of power but I don't want it to be loud, I like hearing passengers talk when on the highway and that's already hard enough with the stock exhaust.

__________________
99 XJ, black, 4x4, NP231, 8.25 rear. Fully locked.
3" Old Man EMU, 31x10.5x15 Runway Enduro M/T
Xride is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-17-2013, 10:57 PM   #2
AddictedToJeeps
Registered User
1997 TJ Wrangler 
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Clemson, SC
Posts: 242
I bought my jeep after the PO took out the cat, added a magnaflow muffler, and put a tip on it. It sounds like a ricer... don’t go that route.
__________________
White Jeep Club #219
AddictedToJeeps is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 05:55 AM   #3
Motorcharge
Registered User
1992 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Richmond, Virginia
Posts: 11,742
Stock exhaust is quiet. Just get an OEM replacement muffler.
__________________
|Project Motörcharge | XJ Non-Tech FAQ | Ammo Can Lock Box | Motorcycle Build|

WANTED: YJ Rollbar - PM for details.
Motorcharge is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 06:52 AM   #4
mschi772
Web Wheeler
 
mschi772's Avatar
1997 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 1,872
If the muffler is all that's damaged, you can just replace that. Short of rebuilding the thing as a high-performance stroker, there's just never going to be anything you can do to get big gains with a 4.0. If you do want to do what you can, though, I snagged a Dynomax cat-back system from Summit for $75 after a $75 rebate from Dynomax. They throw that rebate around fairly often, so you might be able to get the same deal as I. The only difference in sound is back by the tailpipe where it only growls slightly more. It's basically as quiet as stock, especially inside.

Just for ****s and giggles, check out www.SoundDeadenerShowdown.com. I got a quote from Don for about $960 for the WHOLE Jeep. To significantly quiet the interior, though, you only really need to do the front floor, and the doors--much cheaper. This guy is a great resource, and below is an example of his customer service dedication--I haven't even paid him a penny yet, and he's already provided me with a ton of info.

Quote:
I'm going to use the
measurements you provided to create a quote based on what I'd expect to
find, not having worked on your vehicle. You sometimes have to improvise.

Front Doors (each):
4 CLD Tiles, outer skin
1 CLD Tile, cut into smaller pieces, inner skin
1 CLD Tile, cut into smaller pieces, trim panel
Extruded Butyl Rope
5.1 ft² MLV
7.5 ft² 1/8" CCF
5.1 ft² 3M Thinsulate Acoustic
2.5 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Rear Doors (each):
4 CLD Tiles, outer skin
1 CLD Tile, cut into smaller pieces, inner skin
1 CLD Tile, cut into smaller pieces, trim panel
Extruded Butyl Rope
3.9 ft² MLV
5.7 ft² 1/8" CCF
3.9 ft² 3M Thinsulate Acoustic
2.5 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Clean the outer skin thoroughly. No matter how clean the rest of the
vehicle is, the inside of the doors is likely to be very dirty. I use
denatured alcohol on a rag. Wipe it down until the rag comes out clean.

Start by pressing Extruded Butyl Rope (EBR) between the outer skin and
the side impact protection beams. Leave gaps every few inches to allow
water to drain. Cut some strips from a heavy plastic bag and press them
into the top surface of the EBR to protect it from dirt.
* All doors are configured differently. Some have more than one side
impact beams. Some have the gap filled already, others have rubber or
foam bumpers every few inches. The best way to know whether or not
you’ll be able to do this treatment is to look inside your own doors.

Apply half the CLD Tiles allocated to the outer skin above and half
below the side impact protection beam, assuming the impact beam divides
the door evenly. Cut the remaining CLD Tiles into smaller pieces and
apply them to the inner door skin.

Start with passenger side - the driver side is often a mirror image of
the passenger side with one or two more connectors. Hang MLV on the
inner door skin using Velcro Strips with pressure sensitive adhesive on
both sides. The strips are 2"X4" but you can cut them in half for this
application (most applications really). Start with 2 pieces in the top
corners to hold the MLV in place while you trim it to fit. You want it
to be as large as it can be - just barely fitting inside the trim panel
when it is replaced. You will need to cut some holes in the MLV to allow
cables, rods, shafts, wires, clips and the speakers to come through. You
want these holes to be as small as possible. Every place we use MLV we
are building a barrier and a barrier needs to be as large and contiguous
as possible.

It helps during the fitting process to periodically remove the MLV from
the door and lay it in the trim panel to test fit it. The Velcro makes
this easy. When you first hang the MLV on the door, cut holes where the
trim panel clips go into the door. You can then use these holes to
orient the MLV inside the trim panel.

When you are satisfied with the MLV fit, add two more Velcro Strip
pieces to the bottom corners. It's generally a good idea to add a third
piece on top for added strength. Try the fitted MLV on the driver side
door. If it fits (reversed) use it as a template. You've just saved
yourself a lot of time. If it doesn't, sorry to get your hopes up

By now you should be familiar with the interface between the trim panel
and inner skin. The next step is to add a layer of 1/8” CCF between the
MLV and the inner skin, using this technique:
http://sounddeadenershowdown.com/wp/...arrier-layers/
There probably won’t be space to go all the way to the edges. It’s not
critical that you fully cover the MLV – just do the best you can. It is
a good idea to use a temporary adhesive, like double stick tape during
test fitting, before using HH-66 to permanently tack the CF and MLV
together.

Use HH-66 Vinyl Cement to tack some closed cell foam (CCF) on the side
of the MLV facing the trim panel where it will make contact with the
trim panel. When the trim panel is reinstalled, the CCF will compress
slightly, getting rid of rattles and buzzes in the trim panel itself and
between the trim panel and the inner door skin.

Finally, cover as much of the trim panel as possible with 3M Thinsulate
Acoustic. Use a few drops of hot glue to tack it in place. Make sure you
don't interfere with any moving parts. *There is considerable variation
between trim panel configurations. I don't know for a fact that yours
will accommodate 3M Thinsulate Acoustic.

http://sounddeadenershowdown.com/wp/...e-areas/doors/

Kick Panels (each):
1 CLD Tile
1.5 ft² MLV
1.5 ft² 1/8" CCF
1 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 side

Floor:
10 CLD Tiles
48.9 ft² MLV
64 ft² 1/8" CCF (extra is to double up in the bottoms of the foot wells)

I've specified 1/3 as many CLD Tiles as the area would normally
indicate. Most vehicles have some stock vibration damper on the floor.
Assuming it is in good condition and you don't intend to pull it out,
this should be enough to treat the bare metals areas. There's nothing to
be gained from adding CLD Tiles on top of existing material.

You really don't need any adhesive or other attachment products for the
floor. Gravity, the carpet and trim panels will hold everything in
place. Finally, lay MLV on top of the CCF, extending up and over the
center tunnel, sills and everywhere you can without interfering with
trim panel replacement. You will need to cut holes for the seat bolt
downs and seat belt anchors if they are on the floor. Again, make these
holes as small as possible. You are basically upholstering the floor
with MLV. MLV is quite flexible and will easily follow a simple curve.
Where it needs to be fitted to complex curves you will need to do some
cutting. Use HH-66 to seal the seams in the MLV as you go, overlapping
about 1/2" (more on this in the General Notes section).

Back Seat Platform / Riser:
4 CLD Tiles
6.8 ft² MLV
6.8 ft² 1/8" CCF
2 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Roof:
20 CLD Tiles
33.3 ft² 3M Thinsulate Acoustic

CLD Tiles are the critical treatment for the roof - it's a large
resonant panel directly over your head. I'm very impressed with the
results I've gotten by filling the space between the headliner and roof
with Thinsulate. It soaks up mid to high frequency sound that can make a
very big difference in the noise levels inside the cabin. It's an
excellent thermal insulator for good measure.

I use a few drops of hot glue to hang the Thinsulate in place - it
doesn't take much. Black side toward the roof, white side facing down.

Cargo Area Floor:
9 CLD Tiles
15 ft² MLV
15 ft² 1/8" CCF
4 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Quarter Panels (each):
4 CLD Tiles
5.6 ft² MLV
5.6 ft² 1/8" CCF
2.5 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

Cargo Door:
5 CLD Tiles
6.8 ft² MLV
6.8 ft² 1/8" CCF
3 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides

General Notes
HH-66 is a contact adhesive that will only bond materials with vinyl
content. That means MLV to MLV, CCF (like the material I sell with vinyl
content) to CCF and MLV to CCF. You need to coat both surfaces and let
them dry until just tacky, 3-5 minutes. Press the two parts together.
The bond is more than strong enough to work with immediately. It will
achieve its full strength after a few hours.In most cases you won't need
to coat the entire surface - tacking in a few spots is usually sufficient.

Velcro Strips can be cut in half (2”X2”), or thirds, for all but the
most demanding applications. When working with the self-adhesive side(s)
of the Velcro Strips press the entire assembly into place. It is a good
idea to gently separate the hook and loop sides and press them down
individually to make sure the bond is complete.

I think it’s important that the MLV and CCF layers be removable. It’s
just not a good idea to install these materials assuming that vehicle
maintenance will never be required. Preserving the ability to remove and
replace the barrier won’t harm performance and should be considered
during installation.

Overlapping MLV is one way to deal with seams. I usually prefer to cut
2” wide strips to use as “tape”. I butt the pieces of MLV together and
then use HH-66 to bond the 2” strip over the seam. This is almost always
easier and makes it easier to follow compound curves.

Totals:
82 CLD Tiles
1 roll Extruded Butyl Rope
109.7 ft² MLV
133.2 ft² 1/8" CCF
51.3 ft² 3M Thinsulate Acoustic
26 Velcro Strips, adhesive 2 sides
1 32 oz can HH-66 Vinyl Contact Cement

As an Order:
82 CLD Tiles @ 2.25 = $184.50
1 roll Extruded Butyl Rope @ 8.75 = 8.75
1 121.5 ft² roll MLV @ 256.12 = 256.12
10 sheets 1/8" CCF @ 14.15 = 141.50
52.5 ft² 3M Thinsulate Acoustic @ 3.70 = 194.25
2 Velcro Strips, adh. 2 sides, 10-pack @ 14.65 = 29.30
3 Velcro Strips, adh. 2 sides, 2-pack @ 3.25 = 9.75
1 32 oz can HH-66 Vinyl Contact Cement @ 15.25 = 15.25
1 2" Maple Roller (Free w/ 60+ CLD Tiles) N/C

Sub Total: $839.42
Shipping for MLV: 69.39
Shipping for Balance: 58.10
Total: $966.91

I know you said you planned to treat in stages so I stand ready to break
this down any way you need me to.
mschi772 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 10:23 AM   #5
Paradise XJ
Registered User
1990 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Paradise, CA, Northern California
Posts: 2,067
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xride View Post
What's my best option for maybe a bit of power but I don't want it to be loud
You're not about to get "more power" from a different muffler unless you gut/remove the cat, and even then it would be very minimal. I have to agree with Motorcharge that an OEM muffler is quiet.

There could also be other issues upstream in the pipe connections or even at the manifold if it's sounds like a tractor. I'm going through my whole exhaust system now and have found 2 leaks in the manifold (fixed) one at the donut (fixed) and a crack in the pipe at the cat (a broken weld).
__________________
1990 XJ Laredo - White & Chrome
1988 MJ Pioneer - Metallic Green and Black
Paradise XJ is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 10:46 AM   #6
Xride
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Edmonton Alberta
Posts: 1,415
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paradise XJ View Post
You're not about to get "more power" from a different muffler unless you gut/remove the cat, and even then it would be very minimal. I have to agree with Motorcharge that an OEM muffler is quiet.

There could also be other issues upstream in the pipe connections or even at the manifold if it's sounds like a tractor. I'm going through my whole exhaust system now and have found 2 leaks in the manifold (fixed) one at the donut (fixed) and a crack in the pipe at the cat (a broken weld).
It started sounding like a tractor the moment the stick punched a hole in it and gashed it (1"x3" tear)
I am sure that after 180k km my cat is doing nothing at this point, although don't want to take it out yet.

How do I check for other leaks? I had a peak under in the winter and couldn't see any exhaust leaking, but that could have changed now, but not sure how to tell without the visual cue.
__________________
99 XJ, black, 4x4, NP231, 8.25 rear. Fully locked.
3" Old Man EMU, 31x10.5x15 Runway Enduro M/T
Xride is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 12:22 PM   #7
mschi772
Web Wheeler
 
mschi772's Avatar
1997 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 1,872
I don't want to give you the impression that I'm trying to tell you want to do or that any other course is the wrong one, but consider the fact that cat-backs can be pretty inexpensive, a new cat isn't too bad either (~$100; all cats are low restriction, so "high-flow" is a gimmick to rip you off), a new manifold or even a quality header like APN is like $150, and a downpipe is whatever .... heck, how about just save-up a little and replace the whole exhaust system front to back? Unless you've changed them, your O2 sensors are probably quite old, so replacing them would be smart/beneficial, too.
mschi772 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 03:34 PM   #8
Xride
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Edmonton Alberta
Posts: 1,415
Quote:
Originally Posted by mschi772 View Post
I don't want to give you the impression that I'm trying to tell you want to do or that any other course is the wrong one, but consider the fact that cat-backs can be pretty inexpensive, a new cat isn't too bad either (~$100; all cats are low restriction, so "high-flow" is a gimmick to rip you off), a new manifold or even a quality header like APN is like $150, and a downpipe is whatever .... heck, how about just save-up a little and replace the whole exhaust system front to back? Unless you've changed them, your O2 sensors are probably quite old, so replacing them would be smart/beneficial, too.
It's not even a matter of saving up. I just hate spending money where it isn't spent in good use.

I have new O2 sensors sitting on my workbench actually. Doing the manifold back probably wouldn't be a bad idea.
To bad dumping the exhaust before the axle would make it so loud. Seems like that's the trickiest part.
__________________
99 XJ, black, 4x4, NP231, 8.25 rear. Fully locked.
3" Old Man EMU, 31x10.5x15 Runway Enduro M/T
Xride is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 04:37 PM   #9
mschi772
Web Wheeler
 
mschi772's Avatar
1997 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Racine, WI
Posts: 1,872
Not sure what you mean by "trickiest part." Installing a pre-bent tailpipe was a little tricky, but I did it alone in my driveway when I was still a bit of a newbie, so I have to say that it's still quite easy. Dumping the exhaust that early would also be risky for anyone inside the vehicle in terms of CO poisoning; I'd never risk such a thing.
mschi772 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 04:49 PM   #10
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 3,359
IME of 16 years with 4 L engines in 2 XJs and 1 LJ, an OEM stock muffler is by far the quietest and breaths plenty good too.

I don't believe any claims of aftermarket mufflers being quiet. I tried a Hush Power after market muffler on my LJ due to the bull poop promises of the manufacturer and a local 4 wheel drive shop. That frigging Hush Power gave me head aches on the freeway and caused cops to follow me around town.

And it did NOT improve power at all. If anything, the reduced back pressure reduced my torque and reduced lowend and midrange power. Seemed like high end was better, but who needs that?

I went back to stock muffler. The stock muffler is the best for 4L engines. IMO

Having learned my lesson, I'll always use stock exhaust system. The stock exhaust breathes great and is quiet too. This is a case where stock is best. IMO

I suggest OEM muffler ideally, or Crown OEM equivalent replacement muffler.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 05:01 PM   #11
Charley3
Web Wheeler
1999 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Longview, WA
Posts: 3,359
If you think your flow is obstructed, check the cat and replace if necessary.

If cat does need replacing, put in a high flow aftermarket cat made for XJs specifically, or at least made for 4L engines in general.

That would noticeably improve power compared to a clogged cat, and would still be quiet when used with an OEM or Crown stock muffler.
__________________
Warning: Sometimes I edit a post a few times to get it how I want it.
Charley3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 05-18-2013, 06:45 PM   #12
RockRodHooligan
Web Wheeler
 
RockRodHooligan's Avatar
1996 XJ Cherokee 
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Noblesville, Indiana
Posts: 5,253
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xride View Post
It's not even a matter of saving up. I just hate spending money where it isn't spent in good use.

To bad dumping the exhaust before the axle would make it so loud. Seems like that's the trickiest part.
These are listed as fitting 86-92, but I put one on my 96 and my buddy's 97, worked great.
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/wl...model/cherokee

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/wl...model/cherokee
__________________
96 XJ:Parking lot Pre-Runner

89 MJ: Project: Ground up - Sold
Project: Silverback - Totaled

Quote:
Originally Posted by Apex View Post
Penis inches...
Good god man. Indyorv :rofl: d**k and fart jokes. :rofl:
RockRodHooligan is offline   Reply With Quote




Jeep, Wrangler, Cherokee, Grand Cherokee, and other models are copyrighted and trademarked to Jeep/Chrysler Corporation. JeepForum.com is not in any way associated with Jeep or the Chrysler Corp.