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Unread 08-31-2013, 01:12 AM   #16
chris87xj
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The hard line feeding the rear axle brakes uses double flares. 6 months ago the brake line feeding the rear of my 96 DD XJ blew out just in front of the axle distribution block from rust fatigue as I was pulling into my driveway. I sure appreciated the old girl getting me home. Got a a couple of 5' sticks of line at the auto parts store and that was enough to replace the run with a flare joint in the center. The auto parts store also loaned me a double flare tool at no charge. Once I took the old line off it was pretty easy to hold the new stick beside it and replicate the bends. I worked from both ends towards the center so I could pick a good spot along the uniframe to make the joint. There's a short piece coming off the master cylinder with an odd size connector that I reused since it was in pretty good shape.

My tranny shifter has 3 positions, 1st & 2nd gear in the first one, 3rd gear in the second one, and D with an O around it in the third position for overdrive. I don't think it'll shift into overdrive when the shifter is in the second position for third gear.

You are correct about the part-time transfer case functionality. I'd be hesitant to shift into 4wd on dry pavement at highway speeds unless it was an emergency. The transfer case won't go into low range without coming to a stop.

The trailer axle is bent. The tires shouldn't be slanted; that'll cause significant wear to the inside of the tires. People who don't want to replace a bent axle will often wear the inside of the tires so badly that they have to have them taken off and put back on the rim backwards in order to get some use out of the other side of the tire. This leaves the center tread with little wear while both outside edges of the tire are worn out.

If the trailer shows any wobble or shimmy at highway speeds he'll need to stop immediately and move some weight forward on the trailer to get a bit more tongue weight. At speeds, rough pavement, changing lanes, or downhill braking are often catalysts for for shimmy on a trailer without enough tongue weight. If you live near the highway, I'd probably take it for a short test run before heading for the state line.

I'm out for the weekend, but will check back in next week.

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Unread 08-31-2013, 03:58 AM   #17
anony
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uniblurb View Post
Yeah, when I did the rear brakes I installed a whole new spring kit, ebrake cable in the drum and self adjuster.

You sound like you know what you're talking about since I pointed out his rusted brake lines to him right where you said they rust on the rear. I had already soaked all the fittings with rust cutter and he declined the offer. Since I have two 25' foot spools of brake line along with a flaring kit I should go ahead and change them out in the next couple days.

So which 4WD setting should he be in to slow it down with an AW4 trans? Isn't part-time what you're not supposed to use on dry pavement? Thanks!
The owners manual shows to use 4-hi part time while on wet pavement, snow and ice at normal highway speeds. The part time TC locks both axles up so turning sharp corners and prolong use may have adverse effects.

The NP242 select trac besides the part time 4-hi/lo has an additional full time setting similar to AWD, which is designed for dry pavement and prolonged use.

Here is a link that explains some of the basic Jeep 4x4 systems including an older quadra trac system installed in a few of the older Grand Cherokees, always in 4WD mode ... produced poor gas mileage.

http://www.jeep.com/en/4x4/systems_by_vehicle/

http://www.jeep.com/en/4x4/how_syste.../command_trac/
____

While going fairly straight on semi-dry pavement I have used part time 4-hi temporarily, for certain types of situations such as dry pavement with black ice, etc. without any adverse effects.

On dry pavement in 4-hi the wheels and drive shaft may bind, especially while turning, front and rear axles and diffs don't function as open axles.

I might use 4-hi part time for towing emergencies on dry pavement such as emergency stop, preventing a mishap, crash, etc.

Use of 4WD full time (Select Trac - NP242) is designed for use on dry pavement under most any or all driving conditions.

Most of my towing experience with the XJ has been on a relatively flat freeway and dry pavement there was no need for braking other than to come to a stop at low speeds.

Off-road, on wet pavement and snow & ice surfaces 4-hi helps to stabilize a SUV significantly. On wet pavements, off-road and snow and ice an SUV in 2WD mode will potentially slide and fishtail with less braking power.

The best scenario for the different towing conditions is to have trailer brakes.

Last edited by anony; 08-31-2013 at 04:17 AM..
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Unread 09-01-2013, 04:46 AM   #18
dave564
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uniblurb View Post
Thanks for the info and help guys! We finished loading my son's trailer and drove it out to my place only 5 miles away. Nice that we must have the trailer balanced fairly good since when connected to his hitch it barely lowered the rear at all. But will say he has waay to much stuff in the back of his XJ, along with passenger front seat/floor, since it was kind of squatting a little already.

In following him one thing I noticed was both wheels on the single axle were tilted in at the top and out at the bottom. Kind of like there was too much weight on the trailer itself but not sure? Now I'm beginning to wonder if maybe the trailer was traded in because the leaf springs were weak? The tires also have a strange wear pattern since they seem worn on both the inside and outside of the tread but the middle of the tread is in really good shape. Now I wish I would have bought him another new tire/wheel like I did for the spare and used one of the old ones for a spare.

When getting the trailer I had also installed new good bearings in both the inside and outside of the hub. Cleaned all the old grease out and installed new moly-grease.

I asked my son the model of his trailer and he said it read 2,990. I don't think this is the model at all but the GVWR of the trailer and load itself. So since his trailer weighed 1,150 lbs empty the max load capacity should be 1,840 lbs for total of 2,290 GVWR. I don't believe he has near this load on the trailer but it could be close to 1,200-1,500lbs.



Thanks again for all the info!

STOP STOP STOP!!!!

Tell him to take some advice from me, A Truck Driver by trade.

First the weight concerns me a bit, especially since the trailer does not have brakes. It has been several years since I have run the I-40 corridor, but you are correct that the 6% grades through there (CA, AZ, NM) are going to be issue.

I strongly suggest loosing the barbell weights and ship them to him at a later time on a freight company. (Yellow, Roadway etc.) The shipping cost will prove less than a transmission replacement in the middle of nowhere. Look at it as an insurance policy. If he insists on needing them, get him a membership to Powerhouse Gym.

You are right on track with the trailer loading, (60% load forward of axle 40% behind). The tire wear issue might be from them being run with too little air pressure. BE SURE they are at max cold pressure.

TAKE IT TO A TRUCK STOP AND SCALE IT BEFORE HE LEAVES!!!

As for the tires being tilted out, being a used landscape trailer, there is a good chance that the axle is bent from being overloaded in the past. If it looked like that before it was loaded he might be ok. IF NOT then he has too much on it. The scale ticket will tell more. MAX LOAD ON A SINGLE AXLE TRAILER 3500LB GROSS!!! Without brakes I stay under 2400LB, any more you will over limit the XJ brake system in my opinion.

Since it is an XJ pulling load, once he gets to New Mexico I would tell him to park it and sleep during the heat of the day, and travel at night. The cooler temps will help the rest of the way.

All the other tune up/mods that you have done are on track, especially the trans cooler.

MAKE SURE HE HAS THE RIGHT SIZE WRENCH FOR THE TRAILER LUG NUTS!!!! (I got burn't on that one once, they are not always a match to the tow vehicle.)


DRIVING:
3rd gear, especially going up hill. You can run in 3rd up to about 65MPH. Beyond that you are starting to break 3000 rpm, not that the engine can't handle it, I just don't like to go there.

DON'T TRY TO SET THE LAND SPEED RECORD. Take your time on the hills until you find out what will happen on the down side, you can always speed up. SLOWING DOWN IS ANOTHER ISSUE!!

Good luck, and it is not a race...
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Unread 09-01-2013, 04:55 AM   #19
Uniblurb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris87xj View Post
The hard line feeding the rear axle brakes uses double flares. 6 months ago the brake line feeding the rear of my 96 DD XJ blew out just in front of the axle distribution block from rust fatigue as I was pulling into my driveway. I sure appreciated the old girl getting me home. Got a a couple of 5' sticks of line at the auto parts store and that was enough to replace the run with a flare joint in the center. The auto parts store also loaned me a double flare tool at no charge. Once I took the old line off it was pretty easy to hold the new stick beside it and replicate the bends. I worked from both ends towards the center so I could pick a good spot along the uniframe to make the joint. There's a short piece coming off the master cylinder with an odd size connector that I reused since it was in pretty good shape.

My tranny shifter has 3 positions, 1st & 2nd gear in the first one, 3rd gear in the second one, and D with an O around it in the third position for overdrive. I don't think it'll shift into overdrive when the shifter is in the second position for third gear.

You are correct about the part-time transfer case functionality. I'd be hesitant to shift into 4wd on dry pavement at highway speeds unless it was an emergency. The transfer case won't go into low range without coming to a stop.

The trailer axle is bent. The tires shouldn't be slanted; that'll cause significant wear to the inside of the tires. People who don't want to replace a bent axle will often wear the inside of the tires so badly that they have to have them taken off and put back on the rim backwards in order to get some use out of the other side of the tire. This leaves the center tread with little wear while both outside edges of the tire are worn out.

If the trailer shows any wobble or shimmy at highway speeds he'll need to stop immediately and move some weight forward on the trailer to get a bit more tongue weight. At speeds, rough pavement, changing lanes, or downhill braking are often catalysts for for shimmy on a trailer without enough tongue weight. If you live near the highway, I'd probably take it for a short test run before heading for the state line.

I'm out for the weekend, but will check back in next week.
Yeah, I had a darn squirrel bite a hole in the rubber hose going to the RF caliper on my 93 XJ a couple months ago. Of course it didn't blow out until I was 5 miles from home and had absolutely no brakes. Good reason for keeping a good working ebrake and luckily it's a 5-speed manual trans. I was able to limp home in rush hour traffic just downshifting and using the ebrake to stop. Scary but it worked.

I knew the fittings coming out of the MC were double flares w/metric fittings but didn't know the rear lines had double flares. Doesn't really matter since I have a double flaring kit I bought 6 months ago and plenty of line if I want to replace the whole run.

Sure don't like hearing the trailer has a bent axle and that's what's causing the wheels/tires to tilt in at the top/out at the bottom. Believe the PO did flip the tires around on the wheels since both the inside/outside tread is worn off. I'm thinking the tilt wouldn't be so bad if he had new tires on it. Already bought my son a new wheel/tire as a spare. Offered to buy him another one for $100 so he could be running new tires and keep an old one as a spare.

I don't understand my son since he's being real stubborn about having me do any more work on his XJ or trailer. He's afraid I'll take too long, or something will go wrong, and then his trip will be delayed. I tried to explain to him what's going to happen if his rusted brake line blows out when he's going down a steep hill. Also he's going to be disabled by the roadside, have to have everything towed, and will pay hundreds for installing a couple brake lines. Not the best judgement in not allowing someone who knows what they're doing complete the repairs for free as preventative maintenance.

Good tip on taking the trailer for a test drive and we're only a couple miles from a 60mph highway. He did hit about 50mph when coming out to my place on another highway with what seemed with no problems. But the straps holding down the load were buzzing some and we're going to have to check to make sure he doesn't have a tire rubbing somewhere.

Thanks for the help/input!
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-Stalling ZJ? 12 things to check before replacing a sensor; the Dirty Dozen
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Unread 09-01-2013, 05:36 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by anony View Post
The owners manual shows to use 4-hi part time while on wet pavement, snow and ice at normal highway speeds. The part time TC locks both axles up so turning sharp corners and prolong use may have adverse effects.

The NP242 select trac besides the part time 4-hi/lo has an additional full time setting similar to AWD, which is designed for dry pavement and prolonged use.

Here is a link that explains some of the basic Jeep 4x4 systems including an older quadra trac system installed in a few of the older Grand Cherokees, always in 4WD mode ... produced poor gas mileage.

http://www.jeep.com/en/4x4/systems_by_vehicle/

http://www.jeep.com/en/4x4/how_syste.../command_trac/
____

While going fairly straight on semi-dry pavement I have used part time 4-hi temporarily, for certain types of situations such as dry pavement with black ice, etc. without any adverse effects.

On dry pavement in 4-hi the wheels and drive shaft may bind, especially while turning, front and rear axles and diffs don't function as open axles.

I might use 4-hi part time for towing emergencies on dry pavement such as emergency stop, preventing a mishap, crash, etc.

Use of 4WD full time (Select Trac - NP242) is designed for use on dry pavement under most any or all driving conditions.

Most of my towing experience with the XJ has been on a relatively flat freeway and dry pavement there was no need for braking other than to come to a stop at low speeds.

Off-road, on wet pavement and snow & ice surfaces 4-hi helps to stabilize a SUV significantly. On wet pavements, off-road and snow and ice an SUV in 2WD mode will potentially slide and fishtail with less braking power.

The best scenario for the different towing conditions is to have trailer brakes.
Thanks for the info on the different 4WD systems. He has the command-trac PT 4WD system with probably the NP231 TC. Wish he did have the 242, like I have in my 96 4.0 ZJ where he could use FT 4WD on dry pavement w/o problems.

I'll pass along for emergency stopping/stabilization he may have to drop it in PT High briefly.
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-Stalling ZJ? 12 things to check before replacing a sensor; the Dirty Dozen
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Unread 09-01-2013, 05:52 AM   #21
Uniblurb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave564 View Post
STOP STOP STOP!!!!

Tell him to take some advice from me, A Truck Driver by trade.

First the weight concerns me a bit, especially since the trailer does not have brakes. It has been several years since I have run the I-40 corridor, but you are correct that the 6% grades through there (CA, AZ, NM) are going to be issue.

I strongly suggest loosing the barbell weights and ship them to him at a later time on a freight company. (Yellow, Roadway etc.) The shipping cost will prove less than a transmission replacement in the middle of nowhere. Look at it as an insurance policy. If he insists on needing them, get him a membership to Powerhouse Gym.

You are right on track with the trailer loading, (60% load forward of axle 40% behind). The tire wear issue might be from them being run with too little air pressure. BE SURE they are at max cold pressure.

TAKE IT TO A TRUCK STOP AND SCALE IT BEFORE HE LEAVES!!!

As for the tires being tilted out, being a used landscape trailer, there is a good chance that the axle is bent from being overloaded in the past. If it looked like that before it was loaded he might be ok. IF NOT then he has too much on it. The scale ticket will tell more. MAX LOAD ON A SINGLE AXLE TRAILER 3500LB GROSS!!! Without brakes I stay under 2400LB, any more you will over limit the XJ brake system in my opinion.

Since it is an XJ pulling load, once he gets to New Mexico I would tell him to park it and sleep during the heat of the day, and travel at night. The cooler temps will help the rest of the way.

All the other tune up/mods that you have done are on track, especially the trans cooler.

MAKE SURE HE HAS THE RIGHT SIZE WRENCH FOR THE TRAILER LUG NUTS!!!! (I got burn't on that one once, they are not always a match to the tow vehicle.)


DRIVING:
3rd gear, especially going up hill. You can run in 3rd up to about 65MPH. Beyond that you are starting to break 3000 rpm, not that the engine can't handle it, I just don't like to go there.

DON'T TRY TO SET THE LAND SPEED RECORD. Take your time on the hills until you find out what will happen on the down side, you can always speed up. SLOWING DOWN IS ANOTHER ISSUE!!

Good luck, and it is not a race...
Thanks for all the info and appreciate it from a truck driver who knows. I really don't think he'd have the barbell weights shipped separately but don't think the gross load w/trailer is 3,000 lbs. Bad timing on the holiday weekend because I'd take the trailer over to the local feedmill and have it weighed.

Will double check the tire pressure and good point. Would rather just put new tires/wheels on it. Know what you mean about the trailer lugs being one size up from the 3/4" on his XJ. He has a 4-way lug wrench but I'm sure it would be a lot better to give him my extra torque wrench w/socket so he could torque the lugs to 100 ftlbs.

Guess I didn't realize the 40 route had steep grades but did see where it's going through the mountains in AZ through a huge park. Believe the further northern route is even worse in crossing the rockies.

He's planning on sleeping in his XJ and is not going to let it or the trailer out of his site since too many valuables in/on both. Good luck sleeping in a hot XJ and I'm sure his 120lb Mastiff in the back seat will really enjoy that!

Thanks for the advice on speeds 3rd gear can handle and didn't realize you can go clear up to 65mph. Believe he's starting to realize he can't set the land-speed record and will need to take it slow if he's going to make it.
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-Stalling ZJ? 12 things to check before replacing a sensor; the Dirty Dozen
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Unread 09-01-2013, 12:39 PM   #22
dave564
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ONE LAST THOUGHT!!!

I would suggest you put the truck in your name and get the insurance through Progressive or some other online source.

REASONING: (and I am sure someone will chime in if I am wrong.)
Being a 96 with probably more than a few miles on the clock, and I am sure it does not have the CALIFORNIA EMISSIONS package, will it pass their strict emissions and safety tests?? When he gets there, will they even let him plate it without the equipment installed.

IF IT IS IN YOUR NAME WEARING AN OHIO PLATE, all those questions become irrelevant, and since he is only driving your Ohio plated car in California they can't make him do anything to it.

If anything this could be a good insurance policy till you guys figure out what is needed.

You won't have to do this before he leaves (If it is not so already) Just have him leave the title here and FedEx the plate and paperwork back to him. Then of course mail the license tab every year.

I have a friend with a son in the Coast Guard out there with a similar problem. He bought a car missing some emissions stuff in California. He couldn't or did not want the expense of fixing the car, so he sent the title back here to Michigan and had his father put it in his name. Now he thumbs his nose at the DMV office every time he goes by in his dads Michigan plated car without cats...
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Unread 09-01-2013, 01:13 PM   #23
dave564
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TRAILER WEIGHT:
You show a location of central Ohio. Roll the truck into ANY truck stop. EVEN TODAY!! most of the name brand truck stops along the nearest interstate will have a platform scale.

(I have done this with my own XJ when setting up my camper at a Pilot truck stop) The XJ wheelbase is too short to split all the axles on to their separate pads, but the truck will fit on the front axle pad, and the trailer will be on the drive tire pad. Just pull into the TRUCK side of the place and look for the scale. Pull on and park. There will be a call box on a post (at truck window height) Jump up and smack the button. when they come on and ask if this is the first weight, say, "FIRST WEIGH, PERSONAL VEHICLE." They will tell you are good to pull off. Go park, go in to the Truck fuel desk and get your scale ticket, pay $10.00.

Now he will know for sure what the trailer is. IF HE IS OVER the magic 3500LB, turn around and rethink what he is taking, for he WILL NOT get there..

For your benefit, and those reading along, attached is the 2 scale tickets from my stock 2000 XJ pulling an enclosed 10x6 trailer with a 600LB utility quad inside. This trailer has a 200LB tongue weight, and the truck is empty.



File Type: pdf scale tickets.pdf (610.8 KB, 27 views)
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Unread 09-02-2013, 06:28 AM   #24
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Spent quite a bit of time working on my son's 96 XJ yesterday but doesn't really seem like I got a whole lot accomplished. I replaced the main brake line to the rear and all those bends up by the MC sure aren't fun. Didn't help the uhaul idiot who installed his class III hitch decided to run the power clear up to the battery and weave the wire around the brake, fuel, tank vent lines while using a bunch of zip-ties.

Now I didn't replace the 2 lines going from the junction block to the rear calipers. Maybe I should have but they didn't seem as rusted as the main run from front to back. Plus I was worried I'd break that crazy brass junction block with the main rubber hose going into it along with hollow vent line bolt holding it onto the axle and 2 brake lines coming in both sides.

Had my son pick up a new set of good-quality ceramic front pads but didn't install them. Removed the right front caliper and there's hardly any wear on the ceramic pads I installed just a year ago w/rebuilt calipers and new rotors. Not worth $50 for maybe 1/16" more pad thickness and his current slight wear pattern is real good.

I bled all the old fluid out of his brake system with my new power bleeder w/tank and gauge connected to the MC reservoir. Good thing I did since his old brake fluid looked like crap and almost brown coming out. Hasn't ever been done before with 165K miles and brakes are real tight now. I also re-torqued all his lugs to make sure they're good and tight before his trip.

Not sure if he's leaving Tues since there's been a couple day delay on his house closing. The buyer should have never gone through a small bank who are now requesting all kinds of additional info/forms at the last minute.
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-Stalling ZJ? 12 things to check before replacing a sensor; the Dirty Dozen
-Crankshaft position sensor multimeter test. & video of testing.
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Unread 09-02-2013, 07:19 AM   #25
Uniblurb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dave564 View Post
ONE LAST THOUGHT!!!

I would suggest you put the truck in your name and get the insurance through Progressive or some other online source.

REASONING: (and I am sure someone will chime in if I am wrong.)
Being a 96 with probably more than a few miles on the clock, and I am sure it does not have the CALIFORNIA EMISSIONS package, will it pass their strict emissions and safety tests?? When he gets there, will they even let him plate it without the equipment installed.

IF IT IS IN YOUR NAME WEARING AN OHIO PLATE, all those questions become irrelevant, and since he is only driving your Ohio plated car in California they can't make him do anything to it.

If anything this could be a good insurance policy till you guys figure out what is needed.

You won't have to do this before he leaves (If it is not so already) Just have him leave the title here and FedEx the plate and paperwork back to him. Then of course mail the license tab every year.

I have a friend with a son in the Coast Guard out there with a similar problem. He bought a car missing some emissions stuff in California. He couldn't or did not want the expense of fixing the car, so he sent the title back here to Michigan and had his father put it in his name. Now he thumbs his nose at the DMV office every time he goes by in his dads Michigan plated car without cats...
Some real good/devious info Dastardly Dave! LOL, j/k, but it is some good info for avoiding the wrath of the CA licensing/laws.

Before reading this I called our insurance company and have known the insurance agents for 20+ years. My son who used to be on our insurance policy is now on his own insurance. The agent went ahead and changed his policy to my mailing address so State Farm is less apt to figure out he's living in S. Cal. He just bought new Ohio plates here so he should be good for another year.

I'll mention the title change to him on putting his XJ in my name but he said he's going to sell it once he gets out there. Good luck since it will never pass the safety/emission inspections. He just sold his Harley and wants to buy another bike. But I also told him he's going to need some other transportation for hauling his dog/stuff around.

Our new Ohio plates here cost $50/year with no inspections but my daughter out there is paying $500 a year with real picky inspections! I mentioned this to him again the other day and he said, "yeah, but cops look for out-of-state plates and I don't want to keep Ohio plates forever!". WTH? So in other words he's talking about driving too fast out there already and afraid he'll get nailed for speeding! He's had trouble with tickets here ever since he started driving from day one. But he's been pretty good the past 5-6 years and is maybe getting the point. But if he buys a crotch-rocket type bike out there like he wants to, and like my son-in law has he'll be living with has, you might as well 'throw that to the wind'. My SIL does stay with the traffic flow, uses his bike for work transportation, and is ticket free.

I'm showing my age but my son is 33 years old so he sure isn't a kid anymore. Some people always drive too fast and hope someday he'll grow out of that.

Thanks again for the input! Also some real good info in your next post on weighing his XJ/trailer before even starting out. Nice rig/setup you have there w/the enclosed trailer! Sure wish my red 93 XJ looked like your 2000 instead of the rust-bucket it is.
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-Stalling ZJ? 12 things to check before replacing a sensor; the Dirty Dozen
-Crankshaft position sensor multimeter test. & video of testing.
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Unread 09-02-2013, 11:52 AM   #26
dave564
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I am not sure how California handles people moving in with a car from out of state. They might grandfather it in somehow since it was never built with their emissions in the first place. He can't be the first to do this. But if he runs into trouble, the Ownership transfer is a good fallback.

If he can't sell it there because of the emissions issue, I know that you can ship it back here for about $750.
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Unread 09-02-2013, 06:59 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Uniblurb View Post
Yeah, I had a darn squirrel bite a hole in the rubber hose going to the RF caliper on my 93 XJ a couple months ago. Of course it didn't blow out until I was 5 miles from home and had absolutely no brakes. Good reason for keeping a good working ebrake and luckily it's a 5-speed manual trans. I was able to limp home in rush hour traffic just downshifting and using the ebrake to stop.
The rear brakes are not working...

Your Jeep has 2 braking systems, one for the front wheels, another one for the rear wheels. The master cylinder is split for the 2 systems. If you got a hole in a front hose, then you would have no front brakes. However, the rear brakes should still work.

Of course, the front brakes do 70% of the stopping, so stopping with only rear brakes certainly takes a long distance. But you should not have to use the handbrake; the brake pedal should still operate the rear brakes.
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Unread 09-02-2013, 08:48 PM   #28
Uniblurb
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Originally Posted by dave564 View Post
I am not sure how California handles people moving in with a car from out of state. They might grandfather it in somehow since it was never built with their emissions in the first place. He can't be the first to do this. But if he runs into trouble, the Ownership transfer is a good fallback.

If he can't sell it there because of the emissions issue, I know that you can ship it back here for about $750.
Believe if you have your current registration from another state you can register it in CA w/o the emissions test but not sure for how long they'd allow you to by-pass it?

He's definitely going to have to get a job quickly out there. And I was kind of wondering if once he starts paying income tax if that won't be somehow cross-referenced to the CA BMV to see if he has a registered vehicle there? Or maybe it even ask on income tax forms you fill out there.

Found this in a BMV search for people moving to CA:

Fees must be paid within 20 days of entry or residency to avoid penalties. Any vehicle owned by a California resident must be registered within 20 days of entry into California unless a special permit was obtained. Nonresidents whose vehicles are properly registered to them in their home state or jurisdiction may operate their vehicles in California until they:

Accept gainful employment in California.
Claim a homeowner's exemption in California.
Rent or lease a residence in California.
Intend to live or be located here on a permanent basis (for example, acquire a California driver license, acquire other licenses not ordinarily extended to a nonresident, registered to vote).
Enroll in an institution of higher learning as a California resident or enroll their dependents in school (K-12).

NOTE: Nonresident military personnel stationed in California or their spouses may operate their vehicles with valid out-of-state license plates from their home state or the state where the military person was last stationed.
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Not looking good if he gets a job or moves into his own place. All the more reason to title it in my name as you said.

Also saw where it's up to the seller to provide a current emission test that's been completed in the last 90 days to the buyer.

Don't think it would pay to ship it back here to sell at those rates. know my daughter paid some big bucks to have here 2000 Audi S4 shipped out there about 10 years ago.

Thanks for the help!
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Unread 09-02-2013, 09:15 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wgirvine View Post
The rear brakes are not working...

Your Jeep has 2 braking systems, one for the front wheels, another one for the rear wheels. The master cylinder is split for the 2 systems. If you got a hole in a front hose, then you would have no front brakes. However, the rear brakes should still work.

Of course, the front brakes do 70% of the stopping, so stopping with only rear brakes certainly takes a long distance. But you should not have to use the handbrake; the brake pedal should still operate the rear brakes.
Well that's a real good point I hadn't thought of! So even the MC reservoir on 93 XJ is split for front/rear? All I know is the pedal went clear to the floor, could hear the brake fluid spraying out, and had to use the ebrake to pull over to the side of the road. Then I went around the corner to a side street with no traffic. When looking in the right front wheel well there was fluid dripping everywhere and when I saw the bite out of the caliper hose. Thought for sure the reservoir was completely empty but maybe there was still fluid in the rear of it?

Thanks for the input and I'll have to check out to make sure the rear brakes are working. I've been driving this vehicle all over and would think I'd notice if no rear brakes were working at all, particularly in rain/on wet roads. I'll check it out.
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-Stalling ZJ? 12 things to check before replacing a sensor; the Dirty Dozen
-Crankshaft position sensor multimeter test. & video of testing.
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Unread 09-02-2013, 10:42 PM   #30
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i dont know about XJs, but i know on some vehicles they split the brakes up so one outlet of the MC feeds say the front driver side and the rear passenger side, and another outlet feeds the front passenger side and the rear driver side. i forget what this system is called
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