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Unread 09-23-2009, 08:52 AM   #1
03rubiconMG
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best way to tie a jeep to a trailer

What is the best way to tie a jeep down to a trailer?

I have a good assortment of chains, where is the best connector points?

Which type of binder should i use?

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Unread 09-23-2009, 03:49 PM   #2
wilson1010
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The age old conflict rears its ugly head again.

There are two schools of thought on this question. One group believes that the axles to the trailer is the right attachment. Then, there are the chain guys and the ratchet strap guys. Most agree that either chains or straps, they should be crisscrossed to the opposite side tie down points.

Then, there are the folks (like myself) who prefer to tie the rig down from the chassis to the tie down points. Again, there are those who prefer chains and those who prefer ratchet straps.

Technical types, like engineers and ex-military types tie down from the chassis. This is because it secures the entire load and nothing is moving around amassing kinetic energy.

Guys who do a lot of trailering often swear by the axle tie down. The whole rig is bouncing around above the axles, but the chains or straps on the axles look tight as a drum and this is very comforting in the rear view mirror.

For my part, I have no confidence in those little yellow ratchet straps that a lot of guys use, because they have a mechanical advantage of 3-5 to one. So, on a real good day, a strapping fellow can only put about 300 to 500 pounds of pressure on the strap. A chain binder, on the other hand, has a mechanical advantage of about 90 to one so a little girl can actually pick up the front of your jeep with a ratchet chain binder (we did this once to solve a bet).
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Unread 09-23-2009, 04:24 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wilson1010 View Post
The age old conflict rears its ugly head again.

There are two schools of thought on this question. One group believes that the axles to the trailer is the right attachment. Then, there are the chain guys and the ratchet strap guys. Most agree that either chains or straps, they should be crisscrossed to the opposite side tie down points.

Then, there are the folks (like myself) who prefer to tie the rig down from the chassis to the tie down points. Again, there are those who prefer chains and those who prefer ratchet straps.

Technical types, like engineers and ex-military types tie down from the chassis. This is because it secures the entire load and nothing is moving around amassing kinetic energy.

Guys who do a lot of trailering often swear by the axle tie down. The whole rig is bouncing around above the axles, but the chains or straps on the axles look tight as a drum and this is very comforting in the rear view mirror.

For my part, I have no confidence in those little yellow ratchet straps that a lot of guys use, because they have a mechanical advantage of 3-5 to one. So, on a real good day, a strapping fellow can only put about 300 to 500 pounds of pressure on the strap. A chain binder, on the other hand, has a mechanical advantage of about 90 to one so a little girl can actually pick up the front of your jeep with a ratchet chain binder (we did this once to solve a bet).
that pretty well sums it up. X2
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Unread 09-23-2009, 04:33 PM   #4
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bailing twine...

Chassis
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Unread 09-23-2009, 04:45 PM   #5
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Stuff like this is actually covered under state law. Check your department of motor vehicles web site and it should turn up what you need to know. In some states, there must be separate chains or straps for each wheel. This does not mean that the load must be secured AT the wheel, though. This is usually a case of semantics.

I, personally, prefer appropriately rated straps going to the chassis. When I say appropriately rated, I do NOT mean Harbor Freight specials. Most of my straps are surplus from the department of the army. Hold these up next to cheaper straps and you will see what I mean.

Another key point is that there are both right and wrong ways to use a strap. I cant tell you how many times I see a load going down the road with the straps hooked up incorrectly. This significantly reduces the rating of the strap, and can be downright dangerous.

Equally important is the fact that you have brakes on all trailer axles, and that the tow rig have the appropriate brake controller. Just because your tow vehicle can tow it, does not mean that it can stop it. All it takes is a teenager in a Honda to cut you off at 65 miles per hour and you will find out real quick how secure your load is, and how good your brakes are.
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Unread 09-23-2009, 07:11 PM   #6
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Install a large steel skip plate under your rig then a use a large electric magnet as your deck on the trailer.


I use chains and binders and attach them to the axles, never had a problem doing it that way and wont tie down to the frame. If you rig is bouncing around alot.......you dont know how to drive.
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Unread 09-23-2009, 09:56 PM   #7
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interesting video ---> YouTube - Tie Downs 101
Mac's Tie downs ---> YouTube - Mac's Tie Downs on Truck World
How Axle tie downs work ---> YouTube - Car Tie-Down w Axle Straps and Ratchet - etrailer.com
Chain binders (good video just not real close up) --> YouTube - How to Use Chains & Binders

HTH
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Unread 09-24-2009, 12:22 PM   #8
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put 'er in gear and set the parking brake ... then don't look back! just kidding, of course. The above responses pretty much cover it all
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Unread 09-28-2009, 01:45 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jonwood View Post
I use chains and binders and attach them to the axles, never had a problem doing it that way and wont tie down to the frame. If you rig is bouncing around alot.......you dont know how to drive.
X2 on axles. Except I use straps
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Unread 09-30-2009, 09:21 PM   #10
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I'm with the chassis guys. Allowing the jeep's suspension to interact with the trailer's suspension just isn't a good idea. If they manage to sway in resonance, it can quickly lead to an uncontrollable situation.

Is it very likely that this could happen? Of course not. But, it is possible, and the scenarios where it is most likely are the ones where it would be catastrophic if it occurred.
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Unread 09-30-2009, 09:52 PM   #11
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But chassis only works if you tighten down to the bump stops, not many do that and it puts excess wear on your suspension
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Unread 10-01-2009, 01:29 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by jonwood View Post
But chassis only works if you tighten down to the bump stops, not many do that and it puts excess wear on your suspension
Not so. The rig is well secured long before the suspension is fully compressed. While I accept axle tie down as a legitimate alternative, the majority of trail rigs that have chassis tie down points are secured by the chassis, unfortunately with little yellow ratchet straps. But, putting the straps aside, the chassis tie down is the technical preference. That's why military vehicles are tied down from the chassis.

However, some people are nervous about seeing a little flex in the straps in the rear view mirror. This comes with the territory of chassis strapping.


And, the rig does not bounce around because of "bad driving." Actually rough road is what causes bouncing. Bad driving causes inversion of the trailer and rig.
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Unread 10-01-2009, 09:32 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by wilson1010 View Post
Not so. The rig is well secured long before the suspension is fully compressed. While I accept axle tie down as a legitimate alternative, the majority of trail rigs that have chassis tie down points are secured by the chassis, unfortunately with little yellow ratchet straps. But, putting the straps aside, the chassis tie down is the technical preference. That's why military vehicles are tied down from the chassis.

However, some people are nervous about seeing a little flex in the straps in the rear view mirror. This comes with the territory of chassis strapping.


And, the rig does not bounce around because of "bad driving." Actually rough road is what causes bouncing. Bad driving causes inversion of the trailer and rig.
I still dont buy it, if the suspension is not on the bump's then it can and will move and your still putting excessive wear on your suspension and components. I have never had an issue with my jeep moving around enough for me to even think twice about it on many rough, even dirt roads. Thats not saying that it does not sway a bit, probably only about as much as a rig strapped down by the chassis
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Unread 10-02-2009, 12:08 AM   #14
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I still dont buy it, if the suspension is not on the bump's then it can and will move and your still putting excessive wear on your suspension and components.
Yes the suspension will still move. He is not saying that it wont move. When you strap down by the chassis you have enough pressure to keep the rig on the trailer and you are also keeping the rig from swaying. remember those paddle balls we had as kids? the rubber bouncy ball connected to a paddle with a elastic string. Well think of axle tie downs as that and chassis tie downs as that with a chain holding the ball to the paddle. Which one is going to be more secure? The one with the chain.

The suspension is going to be under pressure and holding the tires on the trailer as well as doing its job and holding the body up while allowing down travel.
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Unread 10-02-2009, 02:48 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by jonwood View Post
I still dont buy it, if the suspension is not on the bump's then it can and will move and your still putting excessive wear on your suspension and components. I have never had an issue with my jeep moving around enough for me to even think twice about it on many rough, even dirt roads. Thats not saying that it does not sway a bit, probably only about as much as a rig strapped down by the chassis
Cowboy has the technical approach I talked about above. I think it must be right because of all of the military rigs being tied down from the chassis. The rig moves above the axles and can generate some substantial forces going a different direction than the trailer and the axles. With chassis tie down, everything is going the same direction all the time.

Having said all that, I am not aware of any instability caused by axle tie downs and so I think both are legitimate approaches. The only risk IMO of an axle tie down is harming the axles or brake lines on the axles. A ratchet type chain binder can actually bend an axle in the wrong hands.
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Last edited by wilson1010; 10-02-2009 at 03:38 PM.. Reason: spelling
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